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Courses

ARC-250 Near Eastern Archaeology

The course surveys the archaeology of the Levant from prehistoric times into the Islamic periods. It explores sites, monuments, and artistic remains as expressions of each society's institutions, beliefs, and self understanding. This course also introduces the main issues in the practice of Near Eastern archaeology.

ARC-351 Field Archaelogy

Through work at a field site, students gain experience in the excavation, recording, collection, conservation, and interpretation of material remains.

CHM-120 Exploratory Lab in Christ. Min

Students explore Christian ministry through various roles and are introduced to the portfolio process leading toward consideration of and entry into the Christian Ministry professional programs.

CHM-266 Formational Models for Chr Min

Through an exploration of the scriptural, theological, historical, and social foundations of Christian ministry, students develop a personal philosophy of ministry and mission statement. Flowing out of this philosophy, students explore essential leadership skills for effective Christian ministry practice and service. As a major project throughout the course, students develop a professional Christian ministry portfolio.

CHM-280 Caring Christian Witness

Students are equipped with practical ways to share the Gospel in the context of a growing friendship with others. Students develop skills in nurturing relationships, recognizing barriers and opportunities, dealing with fears, listening actively, and applying Law and Gospel to the needs of the hearer.

CHM-281 Princ. for Christian Outreach

This course is an overview of outreach principles and strategies. Specific attention will be given to those factors in the life and activity of the church which hinder or enhance its growth. Included in the overview will be an analysis of the life and activity of a Christian congregation, steps toward mobilizing the laity, the development of a church growth consciousness, basic planning procedures for church growth, church planting theory and strategies, and basic cross-cultural insights.

CHM-310 Equipping God's People

Students study the theological framework of volunteer ministry, understand the connection of vocation and gifts-based volunteer ministry, explore the best practices in volunteer management, and apply learning to the design of a volunteer ministry program for a specific ministry site.

CHM-312 Youth Ministry

Students develop the insights and skills necessary to facilitate a relational and integrated approach to youth ministry with and for youth in a congregation, which emphasizes peer, family, and congregational support networks.

CHM-314 Family & Children Ministry

Students explore the societal and cultural contexts of family and children�s ministry, apply foundational Christian educational theory, and work with current and emerging approaches to Christian education across the lifespan.

CHM-320 A Nurturing Christian Ministry

Students explore the scriptural, theological, and historical role of Christian education within the church. This exploration will equip students to nurture Christians in the faith across the lifespan through an intentional implementation of Christian educational programs and experiences.

CHM-322 Ldrshp in Christian Ministry

Students study and apply leadership models for guiding Christian ministry organizations into the future. Servant and team leadership, founded upon scriptural and contemporary study, serve as foundational leadership models for student exploration. The course equips students with key managerial and administrative skills essential for organizational leadership.

CHM-324 Strat. Approaches Christ. Min.

Students explore and apply current strategic planning theories, methods, and tools to help Christian ministry organizations fulfill their missions within ever-changing communities and cultural contexts.

CHM-326 Healthy Congregational Change

Students study how to guide and assist congregations through the necessary process of productive change. Through case study analysis and projects, students apply organizational change and systems theory to congregations and ministry organizations.

CHM-370 Christian Ministry Fld Work I

Participants will have opportunity to work in a local congregation under the supervision of a parish professional. A minimum of five hours of service per week, in addition to one seminar hour, is required.

CHM-371 Mission of God in Chrstn Min.

This course traces the mission of God through the Old and New Testaments. It explores God�s intent for his mission people in the past, present, and future; and it discloses that intent in biblical narratives and texts as well as in Lutheran theology and the Lutheran Confessions.

CHM-372 Christian Min. Fld Work II

Participants will have opportunity to work in a local congregation under the supervision of a parish professional. A minimum of five hours of service in addition to one (seminar) per week is required.

CHM-381 Congregational Outreach

Students explore a multi-phase organizational strategy for outreach, analyze a variety of approaches to outreach and, by means of class and field experiences, design a model of congregational outreach suitable to a chosen contextual setting.

CHM-382 Congregational Discipleship

Students explore and apply the biblical principles of and methods for welcoming, discipling, and incorporating people into a Christian congregation. Students also develop an understanding of a congregational ministry to people who have withdrawn from Word and Sacrament ministries.

CHM-384 Entrepreneurial Ministries

Students explore and analyze biblical principles and entrepreneurial strategies for the formation of ministries that can lead to church starts in various settings and contexts.

CHM-401 Faith Development Across Life

Students study the practice of teaching the faith across the lifespan, paying particular attention to principles of biblical interpretation from a Lutheran perspective. The participant will develop a philosophy of teaching that incorporates an understanding of educational theory and practice, and uses tools and skills needed for appropriate biblical study and teaching within a Lutheran framework.

CHM-416 Issues in Christian Education

Students collaborate with faculty to explore selected topics and issues within the contemporary Christian education context. Participants develop practical responses and explore organizational and personal change strategies.

CHM-418 Adult Ministry

Students explore theories of adult learning, spiritual formation, and effective teaching and adult spiritual direction strategies. Participants utilize a planning process for initiating adult education programs in the congregational setting for faith formation.

CHM-420 Capstone in Christian Ministry

Students reflect on and formalize their understanding of Christian ministry in the context of their personal identity in Christ, the broader ministry of the Gospel, and their vision of future ministry and personal growth, in the process incorporating their understanding of faith and learning with vocation.

CHM-472 Lvng & Wrkg God's Mission Fld

Students apply the biblical mission mandate to the challenges and joys of every believer�s life as a missionary in various cultures and contexts and North America and around the world. Students become familiar with issues related to being missionaries, such as culture shock; spiritual, physical, and emotional health; language and culture learning; team ministry; and developing support networks.

CHM-480 Foundations for Urban Ministry

Students focus on the distinct outreach opportunities and approaches of an urban context and develop a theological perspective that moves them to connect human care and evangelistic ministry in 21st century urban centers.

CHM-481 Christian Response Wrld Rel.

Students review the core tenets of the major religions of the world and how Christian witnesses develop skills to listen sympathetically, analyze critically, and respond appropriately from a Lutheran theological perspective to people of other major faith systems.

CHM-486 Issues in Christian Outreach

Students collaborate with faculty to explore selected topics and issues within the contemporary context of outreach leadership. Participants develop practical responses to personal experiences and explore organizational and personal change strategies.

CHM-495 DCO Internship I

This internship is a full-time, supervised parish or cross-cultural outreach experience in the ministry of a cooperating congregation, mission organization, or Bible translation agency, extending from two to three semesters.

CHM-496 DCO Internship II

This internship is a full-time, supervised parish or cross-cultural outreach experience in the ministry of a cooperating congregation, mission organization, or Bible translation agency, extending from two to three semesters.

CHM-498 Commissioned Ministry Intern I

The internship provides DCE and DCO students a full-time supervised involvement in the educational or outreach ministries of a cooperating congregation or cross-cultural organization. Emphasis is placed on active leadership in a variety of professional tasks. Students register for CHM498 in the fall and CHM499 in the spring to complete the 12-month internship.

CHM-499 Commiss. Ministry Internshp II

The internship provides DCE and DCO students a full-time supervised involvement in the educational or outreach ministries of a cooperating congregation or cross-cultural organization. Emphasis is placed on active leadership in a variety of professional tasks. Students register for CHM498 in the fall and CHM499 in the spring to complete the 12-month internship.

COM-103 Interpersonal Communication

Students examine their methods of interpersonal communication in various contexts including dyadic, small group, and mediated communication. Individual activities and group work include both oral and written components. Class discussions and small group activities provide opportunities to practice and refine interpersonal communication skills. Objective exams and quizzes focus on cognitive learning of the principles and concepts in the various communication contexts. (COM103 is one of the two

ED-454 Teaching the Faith

Theories of spiritual growth and development of children and adolescents, organization and distinctive characteristics of various religion curricula, theories and methods of effective teaching of the faith and materials for instruction at both elementary and secondary levels are studied. Classroom management and discipline from the Lutheran perspective is also considered. (Prerequisite: ED 336 Educational Psychology, upper level standing.)

GRK-211 Beginning Greek I

Students begin their study of the fundamentals of Greek grammar.

GRK-212 Beginning Greek II

Students complete their study of the fundamentals of Greek grammar. (Prerequisite: GRK211)

GRK-312 Matthew

Through reading of major portions of the Greek text of Matthew, students build their skills in the translation of biblical Greek and analysis of grammatical forms. Particular attention will be given to the indicative verb. Matthew is read in the fall term prior to Year A in the liturgical cycle. (Prerequisite: GRK212 with a grade of C or above.)

GRK-314 Mark

Through reading of the complete Greek text of Mark, students build their skills in the translation of biblical Greek and analysis of grammatical forms. Particular attention will be given to nouns, pronouns, and adjectives. Mark is read in the fall term prior to Year B in the liturgical cycle. (Prerequisite: GRK212 with a grade of C or above.)

GRK-316 Luke

Through reading of major portions of the Greek text of Luke, students build their skills in the translation of biblical Greek and analysis of grammatical forms. Particular attention will be given to the vocabulary of Luke. Luke is read in the fall term prior to Year C in the liturgical cycle. (Prerequisite: GRK212 with a grade of C or above.)

GRK411 GRK411 Acts, Prison Epistles

No details available

GRK-412 Galatians and Romans

Through the reading of the complete Greek texts of Galatians and Romans, students build their skills in the translation of biblical Greek and analysis of grammatical forms. Particular attention will be given to participles. (Prerequisite: GRK212 with a grade of C or above.)

GRK413 GRK413 Gen Epistles, Hebrews & Rev

No details available

GRK-414 Corinthians

Through reading of major portions of the Greek texts of both letters, students build their skills in the translation of biblical Greek and analysis of syntactic relationships. Particular attention will be given to the syntax of subordinate clauses. (Pre requisite: completion of GRK 212 with a grade of C or above.)

GRK-416 Other Epistles

Through selected reading of the Greek texts of a wide variety of epistolary writings, students build their skills in the translation of biblical Greek and in the analysis of textual variants. Particular attention will be given to texts displaying a broad range of textual variation. (Prerequisite: GRK212 with a grade of C or above.)

HBR-311 Biblical Hebrew I

This course is a study of the biblical Hebrew language. Emphasis is on basic grammar and vocabulary. Students will be introduced to the strong verb and to noun paradigms.

HBR-312 Biblical Hebrew II

The study of basic Hebrew grammar is continued in this course. Students are introduced to weak verbs and to the study of the Hebrew text of the Torah. (Prerequisite: HBR311)

HBR-411 Biblical Hebrew: Prose Read

A review of basic biblical Hebrew grammar, introduction to Hebrew syntax, vocabulary review, and readings from the Old Testament prose texts. (Prerequisite: HBR312)

HBR-413 Biblical Hebrew: Poetry Read

The course has the following objectives: a review of basic biblical Hebrew grammar, introduction to Hebrew syntax, vocabulary review, and readings from the Old Testament poetic texts. (Prerequisite: HBR312)

MUS-101 Basic Musicianship

Basic Musicianship is designed for the student with little background in music. This course will present concepts needed for an understanding of the basic fundamentals of music theory. Students will also have an introduction to ear training and the keyboard. (Offered every spring. No prerequisite. This course can serve as a prerequisite for MUS201 and ED446. Studio course.)

MUS-111 Class Piano I

This is the first of two courses in a beginning piano instruction sequence. Through group class instruction students are given a practical knowledge of the keyboard and an understanding of the tonal-rhythmic structure of music. Keyboard skills requisite for handling classroom music situations or for personal enjoyment of music are developed. (Offered every fall and spring. No prerequisite. Players with previous keyboard experience may be exempt by examination. Can serve as a prerequisite to

MUS-112 Class Piano II

This is the second of two courses in a beginning piano instruction sequence. Through group class instruction students are given a practical knowledge of the keyboard and an understanding of the tonal-rhythmic structure of music. Keyboard skills requisite for handling classroom music situations or for personal enjoyment of music are developed. (Offered every fall and spring. No prerequisite. Players with previous keyboard experience may be exempt by examination. Can serve as a prerequisite to

MUS-115 Beginning Guitar I

This course is designed for those with no knowledge of the instrument. Areas covered include tuning the guitar, strumming techniques, chords-two keys, and transposing. Open to all students. (Offered every fall and spring. No prerequisite. Players with previous guitar experience may be exempt by examination and move on to private guitar if desired or needed for program. Studio course.)

MUS-120 Listening to Life:West. Clscl

Using music primarily from the classical Western tradition, this course teaches music listening skills, relates music to history and culture, and reveals music as a conveyer of human emotions, thoughts, and ideals. The course also touches briefly on ethnic folk music, global art music, and popular music (American jazz, musical theatre, and pop music.) (This course earns 2 credits towards the 4 credit Fine Arts component of the general education curriculum. Offered every fall and spring, summers

MUS-121 Listen to Life: Global & Pop

Using global folk and art music and contemporary popular idiom music, this course teaches music listening skills, relates music to history and culture, and reveals music as a conveyer of human emotions, thoughts, and ideals. This course contributes to the Fine Arts/Aesthetic component of the General Education curriculum. MUS121 is required for Music Education students.

MUS-201 Musicianship I

This course begins with a brief review of music fundamentals (scales, keys, intervals and triads) and continues with four-part harmonic writing, and basic analysis. Exercises in keyboard harmony, sight singing, and dictation are included in the course.(Offered every fall. Prerequisite: MUS101 or equivalent as determined by music placement test.)

MUS-202 Musicianship II

Students continue to learn four-part harmonic writing, including the use of inversions and seventh chords. Exercises in analysis incorporate the study of melody, harmony, rhythm, texture, and form. Dictation, sight singing, and keyboard harmony are continued. (Offered every spring. Prerequisite: MUS201 or equivalent.)

MUS-261 Beginning Conducting

The goal of this introductory course is to begin to develop a clear and expressive conducting technique. Students will conduct in class frequently, videotaping their work and receiving immediate feedback and suggestions for improvement. Students will learn to conduct regular beat patterns, preparatory gestures, cues, cutoffs, deadbeats, fermatas, asymmetrical patterns, and subdivided gestures. Students will learn to make thoughtful decisions in varying their conducting pattern to show changes

MUS-301 Musicianship III

Students learn to write in the contrapuntal style of the 18th century. Chromatic harmonies and a study of classical period forms are also included in the course. Dictation, sight-singing, and keyboard harmony are continued. (Offered every fall. Prerequisite: MUS202 or equivalent.)

MUS-302 Musicianship IV

Students explore the new directions composers have taken in the 20th century and compose their own pieces in various contemporary styles. Keyboard harmony, dictation, and sight-singing are continued. (Offered every spring. Prerequisite: MUS301.)

MUS-321 Music History I

This course explores the Ancient, medieval, Renaissance and early Baroque periods of Western music. (Offered every third semester in sequence with the other two Music History Courses). Prerequisites: MUS120 or MUS121, MUS201.)

MUS-322 Music History II

This course explores the 18th and 19th centuries of Western music. (Offered every third semester in sequence with the other two Music History Courses). Prerequisites: MUS120 or MUS121, MUS201. MUS321 is preferred, but not required.)

MUS-323 Music History III

This course explores Western Music from the late 19th century to the present. (Offered every third semester in sequence with the other two Music History Courses). Prerequisites MUS 120 or 121 and 201. MUS 321 and 322 preferred but not required.

MUS-366 Vocal Techniques & Pedagogy

This course is designed for advanced singers who wish to gain techniques and practice in teaching vocal technique, both in working with individual voice lessons and with choral groups. This course is required for the vocal tracks of the director of parish music (DPM) program and the music teaching major. Activities include leading warm-ups and teaching peer voice lessons. (Offered even falls. Prerequisites: private voice study and consent of instructor. Studio course.)

MUS-425 Choral Literature

A study of the choral literature from the Renaissance through the present (including global choral music) forms the material for this course. Choral composers and representative compositions from each era are studied. The historical perspective on choral music is discussed and a filing card reference library developed. (Offered odd falls. Prerequisites: MUS120, MUS202 or consent of instructor.)

MUS-439 Parish Music Admin Field Exp

This course offers experiences in parish music under the supervision of a cooperating parish musician. Activities include directing choirs, leading and accompanying congregational singing, performing attendant music, working with instrumentalists and cantors, planning worship, and composing practical service music. (Offered on demand. Prerequisite: approval of Music Department.)

MUS-445 Choral Arranging

This course is designed for the musician wishing to make effective settings for choral groups. (Offered odd springs. Prerequisites: MUS301, current or previous enrollment in MUS302.)

MUS-456 Choral Conducting & Methods

This advanced conducting course will apply and develop the skills gained in MUS261, focusing on leading choirs. Topics will include literature selection/programming for various school and church choirs, choral score study, audition procedures, seating formations, rehearsal planning and execution, working to develop vocal quality and musicianship in rehearsals and administration of church and school choral programs. A major component of the course will be the preparation and conducting of a

MUS-492 Composition Recital

The student is challenged to compose a major piece or group of pieces. Students are challenged to begin to develop a personal language, one that gives evidence of skill, imagination and originality and that communicates effectively to an audience. This project is the capstone experience for the Music Major in the Music Theory/Composition track. As part of this capstone, students will submit a written essay describing how the experience implemented and was supported by the Framework for

MUS-493 Senior Project: Thesis

The student will research a musicological topic, write a documented thesis and present their research in a public lecture/demonstration. This project is the capstone experience for the Music Major in the Music History/Literature track. As part of this capstone, students will submit a written essay describing how the experience implemented and was supported by the Framework for Learning. (Offered on demand. Prerequisites: MUS321, MUS322 and consent of instructor.) Honors Lesson fee applies.

MUS-494 Sr Project:Conducting Recital

The student will conduct a public recital of an instrumental and/or vocal ensemble for which they have selected literature, prepared scores, rehearsed the ensemble, and prepared a program. The conducting experience may involve regularly scheduled university ensembles and student organized ensembles. This project is done with the supervision of the appropriate faculty conducting teacher. This is an option for the capstone experience for the Music Major in the Applied Music track. As part of this

MUS-495 Sr. Project: Recital

The student will present a public recital on their primary instrument, building on private lesson study over several semesters. This project is done with the supervision of the student's primary applied teacher. This is the capstone experience for the Music Major in the Applied Music track. As part of this capstone, students will submit a written essay describing how the experience implemented and was supported by the Framework for Learning. (Offered on demand. Prerequisites: MUS9xx and consent

MUS-713 Jubilate Choir

This choir regularly provides music for chapel worship. Special projects include the Fine Arts Christmas Concert and choral worship services throughout the year. While full-year membership is desired, students may audition to enter the choir at semester breaks. Jubilate is an excellent ensemble for students who wish to sing but are involved in other touring ensembles or will be off-campus part of the year as student teachers or interns. (Offered every fall and spring. Prerequisite: choral

MUS-860 Voice

1 credit each, repeatable. Meets 1/2 hour per week. May not be taken pass/no pass. These courses may be repeated with credit. Individual lessons on the standard orchestral and band instruments and voice stress proper tone production, phrasing and style. Special techniques unique to the instrument are studied. Material covered includes standard works for the instrument. All lessons include studio classes scheduled throughout the term as a lab time. (Offered every semester. Prerequisites:

PHI-341 Major Systems of Philosophy

A selective historical survey of the principal areas of inquiry, key figures, major issues and tentative resolutions and the central themes prevailing in western philosophy during the ancient, medieval, modern and contemporary periods. The course is based on readings from primary sources and supplementary lectures and discussions.

PSY-101 Introduction to Psychology

This course introduces the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Psychological, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic, psychodynamic and social-cultural perspectives are explored. Topics such as scientific method, statistical reasoning, neuroscience, learning, cognitive processes, development, psychological adjustment, therapy, social psychology, diversity and community are studied.

PSY-215 Child & Ad Dev Psy for K-12 Ed

This course will provide K through 12 educators an understanding of human growth and development from the prenatal stages through adolescence. Developmental processes are studied from both a biological and social-cultural perspective to understand physical and perceptual development, cognition and language, personality and social development. Child studies, examining various aspects of child and adolescent development, are required. (Prerequisite: PSY101)

THL-100 Biblical Heritage of Christian

An investigation of the sacred literature and basic theological expressions of the Christian tradition. The course emphasizes the covenant dealings of God with His people and the completion of the old covenant in God's new covenant in Jesus Christ. Students will read selected portions from each major division of the Old and New Testaments and will explore themes taken up by the ecumenical creeds. This course fulfills the introductory general education requirement for Theology and counts toward

THL-203 Old Testament Narrative

A survey of the narrative of the Torah, the Former Prophets, and the Writings. Special attention is paid to the concepts of promise, law, covenant, grace, and the presence of God in the story of God's people. The course concludes with a survey of the intertestamental period and the Old Testament apocryphal literature. This course is required for the minor in Confessional Lutheranism. It is not a general education course.

THL-206 New Testament

An introduction to the historical context and literature of the New Testament. Students master the stories and teachings of early Christianity, practice the use of the tools of biblical interpretation, and grow in their ability to read texts of the Bible in their historical and literary contexts. This course fulfills the introductory general education requirement for Theology, counts toward the minor in Religion, and is required for the minor in Confessional Lutheranism.

THL-241 Church History

A panoramic survey of Christian history and thought from the apostolic age to the present. As such, the course traces the church's institutional history, its theology, its worship life, and the history of its missionary expansion against the larger political, intellectual, and socio-cultural back drop. This course is required for the minor in Confessional Lutheranism. It is not a general education course.

THL-303 Old Testament II

A study of the major and minor prophets; Psalms and wisdom literature; and apocalyptic literature. The course will examine the nature of prophecy, and the nature of worship and response to God's gifts and struggles in life. The overarching framework is God's covenant promise to be with His people and an analysis of how the people responded. (Prerequisite: THL203, Old Testament Narrative; THL206, New Testament)

THL-320 Global Christianity

The question �What is Christianity?� will be explored from a global perspective. After surveying the state of Christianity, its teachings, and practices, students will wrestle with basic questions of life and Christian vocation in the third millennium. A major component of the course will be study of worship practices of area churches representing diverse cultural and immigrant groups. This course fulfills the intermediate general education requirement for Theology. (Prerequisite THL100 or

THL-325 Goodness, Justice & Christ Fth

In this course, students will examine the ways in which both philosophical and theological frameworks change how we live our individual lives and shape the future of our families, friendships, sports teams, businesses, and political societies. In particular, the course invites students to relate these frameworks to their own thinking about sex and family, war and peace, work and the use of its financial fruits�and more generally, to the moral and political action to which they believe they are

THL-330 Our Living Faith

A study of the content and effective application of the Christian understanding of creation, redemption, and sanctification; with an exploration of the biblical basis, the conceptual framework and the contemporary significance of the historic doctrines of the church. This course is required for the minor in Confessional Lutheranism. (Prerequisite THL203 Old Testament, THL206 New Testament)

THL-331 Seminar in Theology

A study of the nature, tasks and methods of Christian theology on the basis of primary sources from the Old and New Testaments, the Lutheran Confessions and representative writings from the classical Christian tradition. Students' readings and subsequent discussions will explore the variety of questions addressed in selected periods of Christian history, paying special attention to how the gospel is implicitly or explicitly an issue in these theological debates.

THL-334 Love and Hate

These two words bring forth a wide variety of actions, emotions, mind�sets, and frameworks for life. Students will spend a significant amount of time examining texts that speak of love and hate in the Bible. But the course will range widely to evaluate concepts of love and hate during various eras, in such diverse areas such as psychology, philosophy, history, literature, politics, and as conveyed in various media. The goal will be to understand various ways of addressing the subject of love

THL-335 God, Death and Destiny

An exploration of the diverse interpretations of death and ultimate human destiny in the major world religions, with particular attention to how these topics are addressed in the Christian Bible (the Old and New Testaments) and in the Christian tradition.(Prerequisite THL100 Biblical Heritage of Christianity or THL206 New Testament)

THL-336 The Problem of Evil

The problem of evil has led human beings to ask difficult questions about God. If God is both all-powerful and completely good (as many religious traditions claim), then why does God allow evil? Or, does evil demonstrate that in fact, there is no God? In this course, students will grapple with classic philosophical, Christian, and other religious approaches to these questions. They also will examine how these different approaches lead to different practical responses to evil in our personal

THL-341 Lutheran Confessional Writings

A survey and analysis of the gospel-centered doctrinal content of the Book of Concord in its 16th century historical and theological context. The eleven confessional documents are studied and interpreted as the church's normative exposition of Holy Scripture, to which exposition the evangelical Lutheran church is committed in terms of both theological method and doctrinal substance.

THL-350 Religions of the World

Major religions are surveyed in terms of artifacts, behaviors, emotions, beliefs, values, world views, and histories. Surveys will be done of the religions in the Far East, Animism, Islam, Judaism, Christianity, and the cults. This course fulfills the general education Global Studies requirement. It does not fulfill the general education requirement for Theology. It is required for the minor in Religion.

THL-351 Jesus and Muhammad

This course explores the lives, contributions, teachings, and significance of Jesus and Muhammad through selected reading of the Christian Scriptures, pagan and Jewish sources, the Qur�an, Ibn Hishan, Al-Waqidi, and some later writers. Students will gain skill and confidence in reading ancient texts and understanding the historical, social, and religious trends that shaped the ancient world. This course fulfills the intermediate general education requirement for Theology. (Prerequisite: THL100

THL-352 Is God Green?

Drawing on the resources of Christianity and other religions, this course examines issues of ecology, sustainability and human health (broadly conceived). Students will explore the significance of Biblical themes of creation and new creation as they consider 21st century ethical choices for the care of the cosmos and the human community. This course fulfills the intermediate general education requirement for Theology.(Prerequisite: THL100 or THL215)

THL-356 One Nation under God?

The claim that the United States is a Christian nation will be examined from the Puritan settlers through the rise of the religious right in the late twentieth century, with particular emphasis on the notion of covenant and the influence of Christian leaders in various reform movements (abolitionist, temperance, women�s suffrage, civil rights). The question of �one nation under God� will be tested against the Lutheran doctrine of the two kingdoms. This course fulfills the intermediate general

THL-357 Christianity & the Media

Christianity has an unmistakable interplay with various forms of the media. This course explores subtle and overt Christian themes in movies, music, magazines/newspapers, theater, the World Wide Web, and television. Students locate, watch, and critically analyze numerous media resources and discuss them in correlation to Christian themes in the Bible. This course fulfills the intermediate general education requirement for Theology. (Prerequisite: THL100 or THL215)

THL-409 Studies in Biblical Theology

An exploration of sections, books, or major topics of the Old and New Testaments, as determined by the instructor and announced by the division. This course is recommended for the major in theology. It does not fulfill the general education requirement for Theology. (Prerequisite: THL203, Old Testament Narrative; THL206, New Testament)

THL-422 Christian Ministry & Practice

The concepts of call, vocation, ministry and team ministry are studied in relation to the worship, witness, teaching, service and fellowship of the church. Students will develop an awareness of the oneness of the church as the body of Christ gathered around Word and Sacrament. The nature of the ministry as servant hood is explored in the context of the life of local churches. Students spend time off campus in local congregations observing and participating in the life of the church.

THL-439 Studies in Christian Hst & Thg

An exploration of key periods, important individuals, or significant theological issues or movements in the history of Christianity from the end of the New Testament period to the present. Topics are determined by the instructor and announced by the department.

THL-460 Worship for Lutherans

A study of the interaction between the essential tenets of Lutheran Christianity and the structures of democratic society. Among the topics considered are Christian vocation, the nature of culture and the ways Christianity has historically related to culture (with a special emphasis on the interplay of religion, church and race in North American cultural experience), the functions of Law and Gospel, the Lutheran understanding of the two governments, and the role of Christians in society at

THL-488 Independent Study

Independent study offers students an opportunity to do research and complete a major project in an area of religion of their own choosing. This course is an elective for the major in theology. It does not fulfill the general education requirement for Theology.

THY371 THY371 Mission of God

This course traces the mission of God through the Old and New Testaments. It explores God�s intent for his mission people in the past, present and future and discovers that intent in biblical narratives and texts and in Lutheran theology and confessions.

THY496 THY496 Theology Internship

No details available

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