Minor inEnvironmental Science

Minoring in Environmental Science involves the study of how the physical and biological processes that shape the natural world interact. How is air or water quality measured? How can carbon footprints be reduced? What makes an ecological system sustainable? You’ll sharpen your analytical, problem-solving, scientific reasoning, critical thinking, communication and laboratory skills as you take 20 credit hours toward an Environmental Science minor in conjunction with a different bachelor’s degree major.

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Environmental Science Curriculum Overview

You’ll sharpen your analytical, problem-solving, scientific reasoning, critical thinking, communication and laboratory skills as you take 20 credit hours toward an Environmental Science minor in conjunction with a different bachelor’s degree major.

Required: 6-7 Credits
Course ID Course Name Credit Hours
ENV - 120 Intro to Environmental Science 0
CHE - 110 Chemistry in Perspective 0
CHE - 115 General Chemistry I 4
CHE - 141 Household Chemistry 0

This course is designed to introduce students to environmental science. Course topics will include factors influencing the quality of the environment, ecological principles and relationships, and their relationship to population growth, pollution, resource allocation and depletion, conservation, and technology. The course will make use of the Concordia University Natural Science Research Station as an outdoor laboratory.

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Chemistry principles will be developed on a need to know basis within the context of selected societal problems. Class format will encourage students to contribute knowledge from non-scientific fields to expand the base of applicability. This course is especially designed for the non-science major and may not be used for credit in any of the science majors or minors. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory period per week.

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Systematic introduction to the conceptual and symbolic aspects of chemistry. Critical and quantitative thought as applied to the topics of measurement, formula and equation writing, stoichiometry, atomic structure and periodicity, bonding and molecular geometry, gases, phases and phase changes. Brief introduction to Organic Chemistry. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory period per week. (Prerequisites: High School chemistry and one year of algebra or consent of instructor)

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A general education course emphasizing applications of chemistry to daily living. Topics range from baking to medications, from cleaning to cosmetics and from secrets under the sink to close encounters with clothing. Hands-on lab activities supplement the topics. (Prerequisites: A high school chemistry course and access to a kitchen and basic utensils)

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Electives: 13-14 credits
Course ID Course Name Credit Hours
ESC - 120 Observational Geology 0
ESC - 160 Earth Science 4
BIO - 220 Plant Biology 0
BIO - 230 Animal Biology and Physiology
BIO - 320 Ecology
BIO - 340 Science Issues and Ethics 4
CHE - 230 Environmental Chemistry 3
ENV - 498 Environmental Sci. Internship 1

This course emphasizes the observational nature of geology. Observations are made of sites near campus and sites more distant from campus. Observations are made of Minnesota's rocks and minerals and evidence of water, glacial, volcanic and earthquake activity in Minnesota's history. The course considers terms and concepts of geology, with special emphasis on use of the Internet and current geology literature. Observations result in being able to discover the history of each Minnesota site.

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This introductory course covers the areas of geology, meteorology and astronomy. Knowledge is gained from the text, supplementary sources, class sessions, field work and by use of geology, meteorology and astronomy equipment. A great variety of supplementary aids, including the use of web sites, enhance the course. Three lectures and one two hour laboratory per week.

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This course is a study of botany based primarily upon morphological and physiological concepts and principles. Major topics include the plant cell; the ontogeny, structure and physiology of plant tissues and organs; and the forms, phylogeny and life cycles of representative plant groups. Three lecture/demonstration sessions and one two-hour laboratory period per week.

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This course provides a comparative study of major animal groups within a taxonomic, morphological and physiological framework. Major topics include animal cells, animal tissues, organ systems, animal phylogeny, life cycles and development. Three lecture sessions and one three hour laboratory period per week. (Prerequisites: BIO120)

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This course provides the opportunity to study the inter-relationships between organisms, both plant and animal and their environment. These studies include intraspecies and interspecies relationships. The lab consists of field study techniques, collecting, analyzing and interpreting data. Thee lecture/discussion sections and one three hour laboratory period per week. (Prerequisite: BIO120 and BIO130, Recommended: MAT110).

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This course includes a short introduction to the study of philosophy and ethics, followed by critical analyses of current issues in health and environmental sciences. Ethical discussions are framed in a solid understanding of the science behind each topic. The course will include a variety of formats, including reading and reviewing papers and/or texts, analyzing case studies, and participating in class discussions. (Prerequisite: BIO120 and CHE115).

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This course considers the chemistry of earth's natural environment: air, water, and soil. Systems will be examined to contrast their natural chemistries with potential environmental pollution effects. Three lectures per week and several field trips are taken to various laboratories. (Prerequisite: CHE116)

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This internship is designed to provide students with a work/educational experience which will help them determine their future educational and occupational goals.

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An academic minor normally consists of 20 to 24 credits taken in courses in one area or related areas of study prescribed by the faculty.

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