Minor inFamily Science

Minoring in Family Science involves examining the way families work and how they can function more effectively. What is the value of education for parenting? What are the effects of policy and legislation on families? How can you teach about sensitive personal issues? You’ll develop lifelong skills in scientific thinking and in understanding human thought, behavior and family interaction as you take 24 credit hours toward a family studies minor in conjunction with a different bachelor’s degree major.

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Family Science Curriculum Overview

You’ll develop lifelong skills in scientific thinking and in understanding human thought, behavior and family interaction as you take 24 credit hours toward a family studies minor in conjunction with a different bachelor’s degree major.

Prerequisites from General Education:
Course ID Course Name Credit Hours
PSY - 101 Introduction to Psychology 4
SOC - 152 Introduction to Sociology 4

This course introduces the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Psychological, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic, psychodynamic and social-cultural perspectives are explored. Topics such as scientific method, statistical reasoning, neuroscience, learning, cognitive processes, development, psychological adjustment, therapy, social psychology, diversity and community are studied.

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This course provides an introduction to the systematic study of society and social behavior. Investigation will focus on the values and norms shared by society's members, the groups and institutions that compose social structure, and the forces that are transforming social reality.

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Required: 15 credits
Course ID Course Name Credit Hours
COM - 403 Family Communication 4
FAS - 300 Meth & Material for Family Ed 3
FAS - 400 Family Systems 4
SOC - 253 Marriage and Family 4

Students examine communication patterns in functional families and interpersonal relationships. Reading and discussion are combined with experiential activities. Course units include diverse family systems, health communication, communicating with aging family members and those with disabilities, communication patterns, family roles, power, decision-making, conflict, stress and coping, ecology, and improving family communication. (Prerequisites: (COM103 or COM212) and COM205)

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This course provides students with the knowledge, skills and attitudes needed for effective teaching of family life/parent education curriculum in a variety of family/parent education settings. Students will analyze educational materials for parent education, will observe/analyze a parent educator in the field and co-facilitate a parenting session in class. These analyses will be based on adult education principles.

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This course is an analysis of the family. It investigates the family as a system of relationships which interacts across the family life cycle. It includes a survey of current developments in the study of the family and an analysis of changes in American society and their influence on family life. Also included is a focus on marriage and family therapy from a systems framework.

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This course considers the family as one of the primary social institutions within the larger social system. It explores the family's internal structure and functioning, how it serves the needs of both individuals and society, how it is changing in contemporary American society, and the societal challenges of families in crisis. (Prerequisite: SOC152)

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Electives: 9 credits
Course ID Course Name Credit Hours
PSY - 210 Child Psychology and Dev 4
PSY - 220 Adolescent Psychology 4
SOC - 353 Themes in Adult Dev. & Aging 4

A broad sketch of human growth and development is provided from the prenatal stages to the adolescent years. Developmental processes are studied from both a biological and social-cultural perspective to understand physical and perceptual development, cognition and language, personality and social development. Child studies of children at the studentsÀ projected levels of teacher certification are required. (Prerequisite: PSY101)

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This course examines developmental phenomena of adolescence, its physiological, emotional, cognitive, parent-child, social, vocational and religious dimensions, with opportunity for personal exposure to youth's needs and interacting societal institutions. (Prerequisite: PSY101)

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This course explores a variety of themes in development throughout the lifespan beginning with youth and ending in the last stages of adulthood including aging, death and dying. Lifespan, sociological, psychological, and family science perspectives will be used to examine a variety of themes. (Prerequisite: SOC152)

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Choose 5 credits from among the following:
Course ID Course Name Credit Hours
HMG - 254 People & Culture SE Asia 4
HMG - 255 People and Culture of China 4
KHS - 320 Human Life Experience 3
PSY - 210 Child Psychology and Dev 4
PSY - 220 Adolescent Psychology 4
PSY - 240 Psychology and Family on Video 3
SOC - 353 Themes in Adult Dev. & Aging 4
SOC - 358 Minority Groups 4
SOC - 359 Social Welfare:An Institution 4

This course explores the people and culture of countries in Southeast Asia including Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos. These Southeast Asia countries known for their ancient culture, increasing modernization and breathtaking beauty, provide a rich setting for interdisciplinary learning. This course is designed to introduce students to the region's history and culture. Students will learn about language, literature, history, religion, economics, politics, education, arts and other aspects of Thai, Vietnamese, Cambodian and Laotian cultures. Students will receive an orientation prior to the trip that will acquaint them with the course and its learning objectives. Classroom instruction and cultural appreciation will be integrated with the cultural tours. Particular attention is given to the Hmong experience in two comparative contexts: Southeast Asia, and the United States. The program will take place in a number of southeast Asian countries: Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam.

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China, known for its ancient culture, increasing modernization and breathtaking beauty, provides a rich setting for interdisciplinary learning. This course is designed to introduce students to the people and culture of China. Students will learn about the Chinese language, literature, history, religion, economics, politics, education, arts and other aspects of Chinese culture. Students will receive an orientation and become acquainted with the course objectives prior to the course. Classroom instruction and cultural appreciation will be integrated with a cultural tour of Beijing, Xi'an , and other major Chinese cities and sites. Visits to the great wall of china, the temple of heaven, the summer palace, Tiananmen Square, the forbidden city, and the Lama Temple. Excursions will be made to local markets, a Chinese cooking class, a river cruise, a site visit to a Chinese school, the Terracotta Warriors, and a Hmong village. Particular attention is given to the Hmong experience in two comparative contexts: China, and the United States.

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This is a survey course designed to enable students to understand the biological, physiological, psychological, social, and cultural aspects of sexuality and human sexual behavior. Students will approach much of the material from a variety of different learning strategies including, research, games, small and large groups discussions, guest speakers, group activities, small assignments/worksheets, etc.

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A broad sketch of human growth and development is provided from the prenatal stages to the adolescent years. Developmental processes are studied from both a biological and social-cultural perspective to understand physical and perceptual development, cognition and language, personality and social development. Child studies of children at the studentsÀ projected levels of teacher certification are required. (Prerequisite: PSY101)

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This course examines developmental phenomena of adolescence, its physiological, emotional, cognitive, parent-child, social, vocational and religious dimensions, with opportunity for personal exposure to youth's needs and interacting societal institutions. (Prerequisite: PSY101)

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This course uses video as its medium to investigate a broad range of themes, concepts and ideas found in the fields of psychology, family studies and communication. (Prerequisite: PSY101)

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This course explores a variety of themes in development throughout the lifespan beginning with youth and ending in the last stages of adulthood including aging, death and dying. Lifespan, sociological, psychological, and family science perspectives will be used to examine a variety of themes. (Prerequisite: SOC152)

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Students study various racial, ethnic, and other social groups in the broad context of American society. Attention is given to the concept of minority status as it relates to prejudices, discrimination and segregation in contemporary life. (Prerequisite: SOC152)

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This course examines basic social welfare theory and methods in order to understand the structure and function of public and private welfare in American society. Social welfare is examined as part of the larger American social structure, reflecting cultural values as well as political and economic processes. Attention is given to several areas of social welfare in which specialization has occurred, including work with the elderly, the chemically dependent and battered children and adults. (Prerequisite: SOC152)

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An academic minor normally consists of 20 to 24 credits taken in courses in one area or related areas of study prescribed by the faculty.

Career Potential

  • Colleges and Universities
  • Community Education
  • Congregations and Other Religious Settings
  • Corporations
  • Corrections
  • Government Agencies
  • Hospitals
  • Junior and Senior High Schools
  • Military
  • Retirement Communities
  • Social Service Agencies

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