Concordia University, St. PaulCourses A-Z

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ACC 411 Advanced Accounting ACC-411
  • This course covers the advanced study of accounting principles including: accounting for combined corporate entities, consolidated statement preparation and analysis, branch accounting, partnership accounting, accounting for international transactions, governmental accounting, non-profit accounting and accounting for bankruptcies, estates and trusts. (Prerequisite: ACC 312).

  • Credits: 4
ACC 412 Auditing ACC-412
  • This course defines the ethical and legal responsibilities of the auditor and covers the topics of the preparation of the audit program and working papers for the audit of the financial statements in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards (GAAS). (Prerequisite: ACC311)

  • Credits: 4
ACC 415 Biblical Christianity ACC-415
  • Students study selected Old and New Testament texts and explore the historical Biblical perspective of Christianity in the context of grace and the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Students learn how religious issues have been addressed and incorporated throughout different eras of history. Students learn how Christianity has shaped elements of management, how Biblical principles can shape individuals for strong leadership, and how to better understand Christians in the workplace within a Judeo-Christian culture.

  • Credits: 4
ACC 413 Cost Accounting ACC-413
  • This course develops and uses accounting data for managerial decision-making. Cost concepts for planning and control, cost/volume/profit relationships, responsibility accounting and inventory planning and control emphasized. (Prerequisite: ACC202)

  • Credits: 4
ACC 422 Fin Acctg Thry & Analysis ACC-422
  • The course will consist of a number of readings in accounting theory and the application of those readings to specific situations using the case study approach. The course will emphasize the development of critical thinking skills and the development of oral and written communication skills.

  • Credits: 2
ACC 440 Forensic Accounting ACC-440
  • Overview of the nature of accounting fraud and how it is committed including an introduction to the actions that can be taken to determine the presence of fraud and procedures that can be implemented to deter fraud.

  • Credits: 4
ACC 421 Int’l Non-profit Gov’t Acctg ACC-421
  • This course will explore the topics of international transactions, the preparation of financial statements for multi-national corporations, accounting for estates and trusts, accounting for non-profit organizations and accounting for governmental entities.

  • Credits: 2
ACC 311 Intermediate Accounting I ACC-311
  • This course is an expansion of topics covered briefly in Principles of Accounting. The course develops the student's ability to analyze complex financial accounting reporting problems and discusses financial accounting measurements, revenue and expense recognition, inventory cost and valuation, long-lived assets, costing valuation and amortization. The student is also introduced to selected topics in international accounting. (Prerequisite: ACC202)

  • Credits: 4
ACC 312 Intermediate Accounting II ACC-312
  • This course is a continuation of ACC311 with emphasis on liabilities, corporate equity measurement and earnings per share. The course also explores the areas of evaluation of financial goals, performance review and special topics in financial reporting, such as: accounting for income taxes, leases, pensions and cash flow. (Prerequisite: ACC311)

  • Credits: 4
ACC 435 Philosophy of Values & Ethics ACC-435
  • The students will understand and integrate ethics in professional and personal decisions. Students will apply an ethical framework called, The Stewardship Principles, to a variety of issues in the profession of Accounting and develop their own ethical framework for ethical decisions in their personal lives as well as in public and employment/work situations.

  • Credits: 4
ACC 201 Prin of Acct (Financial) ACC-201
  • This class introduces the student to the role of accounting in the business world. The principles and concepts of financial accounting and analysis of accounting statements are covered. Accounting cycles, procedures and balanced sheet classifications are emphasized.

  • Credits: 4
ACC 202 Prin of Acct (Managerial) ACC-202
  • This course is continuation of ACC201 with an emphasis on liabilities, corporate equity measure measurement and earnings per share calculations. The course examines the evaluation of financial goals with an introduction to managerial accounting topics including cost/volume/profit analysis, responsibility accounting, allocation methodologies, budgets and cash flow. (Prerequisite: ACC201)

  • Credits: 4
ANT 101 Cultural Anthropology ANT-101
  • Anthropology examines the perspectives of human existence in all places and time. Cultural anthropology looks particularly at the patterned behavior that people learn and practice in society. Both non-literate societies are studied as well as the complex ones of Western cultures. While the course focuses on basic anthropological concepts, students may also learn by doing original fieldwork.

  • Credits: 2
ARB 201 Arabic Language & Culture II ARB-201
  • This course is an intermediate Arabic course. Students will expand on their learning from Arabic 101 and continue learning the grammar, vocabulary, and uses of the Arabic language. The focus will be on learning intermediate levels of classical Arabic and on gaining more practice in conversational Arabic. Students will learn both written and spoken Arabic, Level 2. In addition to learning the Arabic language, students will also learn more about Arab culture and will explore the mutually influential relationship between Arabic language and culture.

  • Credits: 4
ARB 101 Arabic Language and Culture I ARB-101
  • This course will introduce students to the basics of the Arabic language. The focus will be on learning the fundamentals of classical Arabic and on practicing conversational Arabic. Students will learn both written and spoken Arabic, Level 1. In addition to learning the Arabic language, students will also be introduced to Arab culture and will explore the mutually influential relationship between Arabic language and culture.

  • Credits: 4
ARC 498 Archaeology Lab Internship ARC-498
  • This internship provides the student with an in-depth experience in a lab setting that processes and documents archaeological finds. The student learns to apply standard techniques and practices.

  • Credits: 2
ARC 351 Field Archaelogy ARC-351
  • Through work at a field site, students gain experience in the excavation, recording, collection, conservation, and interpretation of material remains.

  • Credits: 4
ARC 101 Intro to Archaeology ARC-101
  • This course surveys the history and methods of the discipline of archaeology. It examines the relationships between historical records and material remains, and it provides hands-on experience with material remains.

  • Credits: 2
ARC 250 Near Eastern Archaeology ARC-250
  • The course surveys the archaeology of the Levant from prehistoric times into the Islamic periods. It explores sites, monuments, and artistic remains as expressions of each society's institutions, beliefs, and self understanding. This course also introduces the main issues in the practice of Near Eastern archaeology.

  • Credits: 4
ARC 301 Palestine & Material Remains ARC-301
  • Students pursue a selective acquaintance with the geography, history and material remains of Palestine. Extensive reading, travel to Israel, volunteer participation in a dig and reflective writing enable students to grasp the significance of the land, its cultures, religions, and remains.

  • Credits: 4
ART 472 19th & 20th Cntry Art & Dsgn ART-472
  • This course examines the revolutionary developments in painting, sculptural and architectural traditions from the 19th C. as well as the Modernist traditions of the first half of the 20th C. and the initial Post-Modern trends that follow. The course links these artistic developments with world-wide cultural influences. In addition, special attention is given to the history of design. (Prerequisite: ART272)

  • Credits: 4
ART 102 2D Design ART-102
  • This course introduces the foundation design elements and principles for two-dimensional design. Compositional problems are introduced and solved in a studio setting. In addition basic two-dimensional media are introduced and explored during the different units of the course of study.

  • Credits: 3
ART 103 3D Design ART-103
  • This course introduces the foundation design elements and principles for three-dimensional design. Compositional problems are introduced and solved in a studio setting. In addition basic three-dimensional media are introduced and explored during the different units of the course of study.

  • Credits: 3
ART 291 Adobe Creative Suite ART-291
  • Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator, Dreamweaver, Acrobat, Bridge, Flash and much more. This project based course will explore the core print, web and interactive design possibilities within the Adobe Creative Suite Design Premium software package. The course material will be tailored to the experience level and interests of the students enrolled. The course is intended to be a jumpstart for the Graphic Design and other digital art courses offered by CSP.

  • Credits: 3
ART 461 Advanced Ceramics ART-461
  • This course provides an in depth study of the techniques and concepts of clay as an art medium. Students build on previous ceramics experience to work in series as a way of developing sophistication in their clay work. Advanced glaze technology, firing options and construction techniques constitute the course content. Learning will be assessed primarily through portfolio development and review. (Prerequisite: ART361 or consent of instructor)

  • Credits: 4
ART 411 Advanced Drawing ART-411
  • This course is designed to establish personal style in a variety of drawing media. Traditional subjects like the still life and the figure will be investigated along with creative and divergent situations used for expression. Significant emphasis will be placed on developing skills in formal and iconographic criticism. Learning will be assessed primarily through portfolio development and review. (Prerequisite: ART311 or consent of instructor)

  • Credits: 4
ART 421 Advanced Painting ART-421
  • This course is designed to encourage the individual stylistic development of advanced painting students. Students may explore new painting media and/or figurative painting while applying previously learned techniques in creating complete artistic expressions/compositions. Students will be encouraged to work in series. Learning will be assessed primarily through portfolio development and review. (Prerequisite: ART321 or consent of instructor)

  • Credits: 4
ART 441 Advanced Photography ART-441
  • This course is designed to establish personal style in photography. Traditional treatment of the medium will be investigated along with creative and divergent photographic expressions. Computer applications in photography will be introduced and explored. Significant emphasis will be placed on developing skills in formal and iconographic criticism. Learning will be assessed primarily through portfolio development and review. (Prerequisite: ART 241 or consent of instructor)

  • Credits: 4
ART 435 Advanced Printmaking ART-435
  • This course is designed to encourage the individual stylistic development of advanced printmaking students. Students may explore new printmaking media while applying previously learned techniques in creating more developed projects. Learning will be assessed primarily through portfolio development and review. This course may be repeated for credit.

  • Credits: 4
ART 451 Advanced Sculpture ART-451
  • This course is designed to develop personal style in sculpture. Contemporary issues in sculptural media and theory will be addressed. Learning will be assessed primarily through portfolio production and review.

  • Credits: 4
ART 371 Ancient Western Art ART-371
  • This course examines in some depth drawing, painting, sculptural and architectural traditions from prehistoric times through the Roman Republic at the turn of the millennia. The course links artistic developments with cultural influences, mostly near the Mediterranean Sea.

  • Credits: 3
ART 101 Approaching Art ART-101
  • This course lays the foundation for approaching visual art by introducing fundamental aspects of the nature of art and art making. The course will investigate four areas which are key to appreciating art. These four units will include the importance perceptual skills, the nature of the creative process, the place of art in its cultural context, and the role and processes of abstraction. The course will involve looking at art, reading, writing and speaking about art using acquired vocabulary and knowledge.

  • Credits: 2
ART 487 Art Education Capstone ART-487
  • This course aims to enable future art teachers to relate the general concepts of art education to specific teaching theories. Past and contemporary theories of art education are studied. In addition, historical approaches to art education are presented, as are a variety of artistsÀ philosophies on the nature of art. (Prerequisite: ED447 or consent of instructor)

  • Credits: 2
ART 387 Art in Secondary Education ART-387
  • This course guides prospective junior and senior high school art teachers in understanding the spirit of art teaching and equips them with knowledge and skills necessary for successful teaching. Students will be involved in practical problems of school art both in the classroom and outside the classroom. The course deals with aesthetics, critical program evaluation, research, history and skill building and idea awareness in Discipline Based Art Education. (Prerequisite: acceptance in education program or consent of instructor)

  • Credits: 2
ART 375 Art of Asia ART-375
  • This course is intended to provide a survey of the history of Asian art. It is arranged in three parts starting with India and Southeast Asia, then moving to China and finishing with Korea and Japan. Special emphasis is placed on relating the art to the cultural contexts from which it came. Influences such as religion, trade and political histories are investigated in their relationship to the art.

  • Credits: 4
ART 374 Art Of Mexico ART-374
  • This course is intended to provide a survey of the history of Mexican art. It is arranged in three parts starting with pre-conquest indigenous cultures, which will be the majority of the course emphasis. It will also include the Colonial Period and Revolutionary Art. Special emphasis is placed on relating the art to the cultural contexts from which it came. Influences such as religion and political histories are investigated in their relationship to the art. (Prerequisite: ART101 or consent of instructor)

  • Credits: 4
ART 499 Art Senior Seminar ART-499
  • This course serves as the capstone experience in the Art Department. The course will vary somewhat based on the student's degree sought. It will normally be the production of a solo exhibition, or of a professional design portfolio, or a Community Arts experience. The work produced and presented must be the student's current work. Individual directions will be developed with the professor and student's advisor. (Prerequisite Senior standing or Instructor consent)

  • Credits: 1
ART 498 Arts Internship ART-498
  • This opportunity is specifically required for Community Arts majors or minors as well as Design Majors. It establishes advanced field study in the discipline in a setting outside the campus context. The internship will be arranged by the student in consultation with the advisor and assessment will be through contractual arrangement with the guiding mentor. (Community Arts majors are encouraged to do this through HECUA.) (Prerequisite: ART301)

  • Credits: 1
ART 261 Ceramics I ART-261
  • This introductory studio course is designed to familiarize beginning students with the fundamental techniques and concepts of contemporary ceramic art. Students will see and also investigate sculptural and vessel forms in clay, along with the relationship of drawing to the creative process. Although significant clay art history and technology will be taught, learning will be assessed primarily through portfolio production and review.

  • Credits: 3
ART 361 Ceramics II ART-361
  • This intermediate course is designed to advance studentsÀ knowledge of the techniques and concepts of contemporary ceramic art. Students will investigate both sculptural and vessel forms in clay with special emphasis given to exploration of a wide variety of surface treatments. Students will develop substantial knowledge of glaze technologies. Learning will be assessed primarily through portfolio production and review, along with class participation. (Prerequisite: ART261 or consent of instructor)

  • Credits: 3
ART 105 Color Theory ART-105
  • Traditional and contemporary approaches to color theory will be taught. These ideas will be beneficial for most studio areas and of particular importance to careers in design.

  • Credits: 3
ART 300 Community Arts ART-300
  • This course is designed to introduce students to the variety of forms community arts programs have taken and are taking across the country. Facets of community arts programs such as legal aspects, funding issues, cooperation and collaboration, as well as aesthetic issues will be explored. Many fine and performing arts genre will be addressed and specific programs will be referenced and researched. Guest presenters from the Twin Cities will play a large part in this course.

  • Credits: 4
ART 202 Digital Art I ART-202
  • This introductory course is designed to familiarize beginning students with the fundamental techniques and concepts of design using computer technology as the primary medium. Students will build on drawing and composition skills to create designs with a variety of design software programs. Although technological and ethical issues in the field will be addressed, learning will be assessed primarily through portfolio production and review. (Prerequisites: ART102, or consent of instructor).

  • Credits: 3
ART 302 Digital Art II ART-302
  • This course is designed to expand studentsÀ facility in using the computer to solve more complex problems. Students will build on drawing, composition and computer skills to create designs with a variety of design software programs. Students will be encouraged to develop a personal voice with the computer. Learning will be assessed primarily through portfolio production and review. (Prerequisite: ART202 or consent of instructor)

  • Credits: 3
ART 342 Digital Photography ART-342
  • This course will investigate the unique approaches to digital photography as an art form. This field will be compared and contrasted with black and white photography and also explored as its own unique area of artistic investigation. Emphasis will be given to seeing and thinking like an artist.

  • Credits: 2
ART 111 Drawing I ART-111
  • This introductory studio course is designed to familiarize beginning students with fundamental techniques and concepts of drawing. In that basic skill building is the core of this course it is a very approachable class for non-art majors. Although some history of drawing will be presented learning will be assessed primarily through portfolio production and review. (Prerequisite: ART101 or consent of instructor)

  • Credits: 3
ART 372 Early Epoch of Christian Art ART-372
  • This course examines in some depth drawing, painting, sculptural and architectural traditions as they emerge from the Roman Empire at the turn of the millennium through the 14th C. The course links artistic developments with cultural influences and tensions between near east Asia and the west in the middle ages.

  • Credits: 3
ART 376 Ethnographic Art ART-376
  • This course is intended to provide a survey of non-western, world art. It is arranged in multiple units, which will sample ethnographic art from across the world. Cultures from West Africa, the Near East and the Far East, indigenous cultures from the Americas and Oceanic cultures will be surveyed. Special emphasis is placed on relating the art to the cultural contexts from which it came. Influences such as religion and political histories are investigated in their relationship to the art. (Prerequisite: ART101 or consent of instructor)

  • Credits: 4
ART 311 Figure Drawing ART-311
  • This course is designed to familiarize beginning students with anatomy and the figure as a subject matter vital in an artist's vocabulary. Students will build on drawing and composition skills to create designs with a variety of drawing media. Although the history of figurative art will be explored, learning will be assessed primarily through portfolio production and review. (Prerequisites: ART102, ART111 or consent of instructor)

  • Credits: 3
ART 100 Fine Arts Colloquium ART-100
  • A Pass/No Pass lab course designed to directly introduce students to some of the Twin Cities arts communities. Students will interact with professional and amateur artists and activities from a variety of fine and performing arts disciplines. Learning will be assessed through written expression and limited oral communication.

  • Credits: 1
ART 485 Graphic Des Senior Projects 1 ART-485
  • The advanced culmination of all previously taught graphic design skills and proficiencies. Project work centers on complex applications incorporating a wide spectrum of creative solutions to both practical and experimental design problems. Portfolio development and artistic professionalism is stressed.

  • Credits: 4
ART 486 Graphic Des Senior Projects 2 ART-486
  • This rigorous studio course is designed to facilitate challenging, individual directions in design and critical thinking. Students map out a plan of study for the semester and work on a series of related ideas that culminate in a cohesive body of work. Students are expected to refine their understanding of contemporary issues and historical approaches related to their specific concept or process, and bring an advanced competency to the technical and formal concerns that inform their work. Through frequently scheduled critiques, and a developed designer statement, an emphasis will be placed on developing a process of self-evaluation to clarify visual choices and express and defend individual artistic points of view. Over the course of the semester students will investigate exhibition design and prepare for the exhibition and presentation of their work.

  • Credits: 4
ART 282 Graphic Design I ART-282
  • This course lays the foundations of the discipline of graphic design. The course helps students apply concepts of design and color theory into applied arts areas. (Prerequisite: ART102 or ART202)

  • Credits: 3
ART 382 Graphic Design II ART-382
  • This course develops sophisticated applications in the discipline of graphic design. The course helps students develop their professional portfolio for applied arts areas. (Prerequisite: ART282)

  • Credits: 3
ART 482 Graphic Design III ART-482
  • This advanced course further develops applications in the discipline of graphic design. Students will work on a series of projects and develop a professional portfolio. (Prerequisite: ART384)

  • Credits: 4
ART 284 Graphic Imagery ART-284
  • This hands-on introduction to graphic design encompasses the fundamentals of design theory, process and practice. Emphasis is placed on the development of creative problem solving skills and processes primarily through the creation of structured iconography and letterforms. Students also explore visual communications-related professions and practices.

  • Credits: 4
ART 473 History of Photography ART-473
  • This course introduces students to 19th, 20th and 21st century photographic technologies, practitioners and images. Emphasis is on Western photographic practices and the impact that the invention of photography has had on our understanding of the world around us from science, history, culture, aesthetics, politics, current events, and every-day life.

  • Credits: 3
ART 211 Illustration ART-211
  • This course introduces the technical and conceptual skills for successful illustration. It is an important foundation for all design and applied arts fields.

  • Credits: 3
ART 333 Intaglio Printmaking ART-333
  • This course is designed to familiarize beginning students with the fundamental techniques and concepts of intaglio printmaking. Students will build on drawing, composition, and other art skills to create editions of intaglio prints. Techniques covered will include etching, dry point, aquatint, collagraph, monoprinting and photo-polymer plates. Although some history of printmaking will be presented, learning will be assessed primarily through portfolio production and review.

  • Credits: 3
ART 142 Intro to Digital Photography ART-142
  • This course is designed to engage students in the basic practices and techniques of creating images with digital technology. The course will focus on a series of varied projects and include aesthetic lectures and critique, as well as basic image manipulation with digital imaging software.

  • Credits: 3
ART 293 Intro to Illustrator ART-293
  • This 5 week course introduces the student to this commonly used software application in the field of design. It is an effective drawing and illustration program.

  • Credits: 1
ART 104 Introduction to Art History ART-104
  • A captivating exploration of the history of art in the West and throughout the world, this course encourages students to develop an appreciation for a diverse range of works of art. Students will explore the creation of art, see it as critical thinking, and problem solving that has relevance to their lives. Students will also see art as a rich array of materials and aesthetic elements combined with the inner workings of the human spirit, passion, emotion, and creativity.

  • Credits: 3
ART 373 Ital. Renaissance & Baroq Art ART-373
  • This course examines in depth drawing, painting, sculptural and architectural traditions from the early Renaissance through the 18th C. The course links artistic developments with cultural influences, with an emphasis on Italian art, but also inclusive of northern Europe. (Prerequisite: ART172 or consent )

  • Credits: 3
ART 334 Lithography ART-334
  • This intermediate course is designed to familiarize beginning students with the fundamental techniques and concepts of lithographic printmaking. Students will build on drawing and composition skills to create editions of lithographic prints. Although some history of printmaking will be presented, learning will be assessed primarily through portfolio production and review.

  • Credits: 3
ART 489 Mentored Study: ART-489
  • This opportunity encourages the student to establish advanced study in an art medium with an internship within the institution in any desired discipline. The mentor relationship will be a guided experience, which encourages the student toward mastery of a studio or historical discipline. Assessment will be through contractual arrangement with the guiding mentor. (Prerequisite: advanced work completed in the field desired)

  • Credits: 1
ART 370 Mexican Art and Culture ART-370
  • This course introduces the student to Mexican art and culture through study and experience in Mexico The social, political and historic context of Mexican culture is emphasized. Required pre-trip and post-trip involvement and observation and discussion carry most of the course content. Students must also complete a project following up on the experiential learning.

  • Credits: 4
ART 431 Mixed Media Graphics ART-431
  • This course is designed to familiarize intermediate students with alternative and advanced graphics techniques, in particular photographic and digital applications for printmaking, as well as digital prints and non-silver photography. Contemporary issues and themes in graphics will be discussed. Learning will be assessed primarily through portfolio production and review. (Prerequisites: ART102, ART111, and one of the following: ART141, 202, 231, 232, 233, or permission)

  • Credits: 3
ART 221 Painting I ART-221
  • This course is designed to introduce students with fundamental concepts in oil and/or acrylic painting. Historical and contemporary approaches to painting will be addressed. Non-art majors can also succeed in this course.

  • Credits: 3
ART 321 Painting II ART-321
  • This is an intermediate level course designed to stimulate and further develop an interest in painting methods and techniques for personal expression. Students are encouraged to create and solve specific problems in painting. Learning will be assessed primarily through portfolio production and review and also class participation. (Prerequisite: ART221 or consent of instructor)

  • Credits: 3
ART 241 Photography I ART-241
  • This course is designed to familiarize beginning students with the fundamental techniques and concepts of photographic practices and processes. The use and operation of the 35mm film camera, experimental and traditional black and white darkroom techniques and new digital technologies will be taught through demonstration and assigned projects. Photographic history and criticism will also be introduced. Portfolio production will be the main form of assessment in this introductory course.

  • Credits: 3
ART 341 Photography II ART-341
  • This course expands students' knowledge of the use of the 35 mm camera and black and white darkroom processing and printing. Students learn to control film exposure and development in order to make consistently good prints. Photographic theory is introduced. Students will fully explore their ideas through shooting a lot of film. Learning will be assessed primarily through portfolio development and review, as well as class participation. (Prerequisite: ART 241 or consent of instructor.)

  • Credits: 3
ART 331 Relief Printmaking ART-331
  • This introductory course is designed to familiarize students with the fundamental techniques and concepts of relief and intaglio printmaking. Students will build on drawing and composition skills to create editions of prints. Techniques covered will include woodcut, linocut, collagraph, and monoprints. Although some history of printmaking will be presented learning will be assessed primarily through portfolio production and review.

  • Credits: 3
ART 332 Screen Printmaking ART-332
  • This course is designed to familiarize beginning students with the fundamental techniques and concepts of silkscreen printmaking. Students will build on drawing and composition skills to create editions of silkscreen prints. Techniques covered will include cut, painted and photographic stencils. Although some history of printmaking will be presented, learning will be assessed primarily through portfolio production and review. (Prerequisite: ART111)

  • Credits: 3
ART 251 Sculpture I ART-251
  • This introductory studio course is designed to familiarize beginning students with the fundamental techniques and concepts of contemporary sculpture. Both additive and reductive sculpture will be explored as students are introduced to both traditional and non-traditional sculpture media. Students will also investigate the relationship of drawing to the sculptural process. Although some 19th and 20th C. sculpture history will be presented, learning will be assessed primarily through portfolio production and review. (Prerequisites: ART101, ART103 or consent of instructor)

  • Credits: 3
ART 351 Sculpture II ART-351
  • This is an intermediate level course designed to stimulate and further develop interest in sculptural methods and techniques for personal expression. Media exploration and contemporary aesthetic issues such as environmental sculpture or installation are introduced, as students are encouraged to create and solve problems in sculpture in specific areas of the discipline. Learning will be assessed primarily through portfolio development and review. (Prerequisite: ART251 or consent of instructor)

  • Credits: 3
ART 271 Survey of Western Art I ART-271
  • This course is designed to introduce students to fundamental concepts in art history as well as important masterworks from the western art tradition. Prehistoric work through the 14th C. will be addressed. Non-art majors can enjoy this course. (Prerequisite: ART101)

  • Credits: 3
ART 272 Survey of Western Art II ART-272
  • This course is designed to introduce students to fundamental concepts in art history as well as important masterworks from the western art tradition. 15th C. work through the present will be addressed. Non-art majors can enjoy this course.

  • Credits: 3
ART 491 Theories in Contemporary Art ART-491
  • This seminar style course discusses theories and ideas that underpin the current art world. The approaches of many current artists and critics are examined. (Prerequisite: ART272)

  • Credits: 3
ART 481 Topics in Art: ART-481
  • This teacher directed course will center on advanced and narrowly defined studio or art historical investigations to be announced. The course focus may introduce unfamiliar or unusual media, or subjects, or provide very advanced level knowledge of a familiar discipline. (Prerequisites: ART101 and consent of instructor)

  • Credits: 4
ART 384 Typography 1 ART-384
  • An introductory graphic design study of written communication through the craft and art of letterforms and application of typographic principles. It serves as an introduction to typography as an element in the design process. The course is taught as a skill and an art form. It explores the dynamics of type in context. From the traditions of book design to the frontier of digital and interactive typography, students explore type as a design and communication tool, investigating these contexts through the lens of historical innovation.

  • Credits: 4
ART 484 Typography 2 ART-484
  • The culmination of all previously taught typographic competencies, this course focuses on developing type skills applicable to the work a designer is assigned at recognized design and advertising firms. Advanced project work addresses functional as well as expressive typography. The class requires students to develop concepts, present and explain their ideas, and bring their solutions to life.

  • Credits: 4
ART 383 Web Design I ART-383
  • The Web Design course is structured to teach the visual, communication and marketing aspects of a good website. It is a project based course where students will create websites and web content using Adobe Creative Suite software (Dreamweaver, Photoshop, Flash) and other web-related tools. Course material will be tailored to the experience level of students enrolled in the course.

  • Credits: 3
ART 483 Web Design II ART-483
  • This course explores the more advanced visual, communication and marketing aspects of professional websites. It is a project based course where students will create websites and web content using Adobe Creative Suite software(Dreamweaver, Photoshop, Flash) and other web-related tools. course material will be tailored to the experience level of students enrolled in the course.

  • Credits: 3

B

BAC 207 Agile Fundamentals BAC-207
  • This comprehensive course builds your knowledge and skills in the agile approach to defining, estimating, and prioritizing requirements. Using Scrum as a reference, you will learn how to build a Product Backlog, estimate sprints, write user stories, use burndown charts, and complete reviews and retrospectives. You will learn techniques for building and managing a Product Backlog of user stories, and techniques for prioritizing requirements for releases and iterations. The techniques described use Scrum as a reference, and apply equally well to other agile methods. You will learn the conditions of success for agile methods, how to scale the agile approach for large teams, and how to adapt current business analysis methods to become more agile. Topics also include the makeup of the Agile team, such as the Scrum Master, Product Owner, Tester, and core team.

  • Credits: 3
BAC 210 Agile Fundamentals BAC-210
  • This three day comprehensive course builds your knowledge and skills in the agile approach to defining, estimating, and prioritizing requirements. Using Scrum as a reference, you will learn how to build a Product Backlog, estimate sprints, write user stories, use burndown charts, and complete reviews and retrospectives. You will learn techniques for building and managing a Product Backlog of user stories, and techniques for prioritizing requirements for releases and iterations. The techniques described use Scrum as a reference, and apply equally well to other agile methods.

  • Credits: 3
BAC 507 Agile Fundamentals BAC-507
  • This comprehensive course builds your knowledge and skills in the agile approach to defining, estimating, and prioritizing requirements. Using Scrum as a reference, you will learn how to build a Product Backlog, estimate sprints, write user stories, use burndown charts, and complete reviews and retrospectives. You will learn techniques for building and managing a Product Backlog of user stories, and techniques for prioritizing requirements for releases and iterations. The techniques described use Scrum as a reference, and apply equally well to other agile methods. You will learn the conditions of success for agile methods, how to scale the agile approach for large teams, and how to adapt current business analysis methods to become more agile. Topics also include the makeup of the Agile team, such as the Scrum Master, Product Owner, Tester, and core team.

  • Credits: 3
BAC 510 Agile Fundamentals BAC-510
  • This three day comprehensive course builds your knowledge and skills in the agile approach to defining, estimating, and prioritizing requirements. Using Scrum as a reference, you will learn how to build a Product Backlog, estimate sprints, write user stories, use burndown charts, and complete reviews and retrospectives. You will learn techniques for building and managing a Product Backlog of user stories, and techniques for prioritizing requirements for releases and iterations. The techniques described use Scrum as a reference, and apply equally well to other agile methods.

  • Credits: 3
BAC 204 Bus Intelligence Req Analysis BAC-204
  • Gathering and analyzing requirements for BI projects have several components that are unique on IT projects. One of the complexities includes uncovering and defining multiple dimensions of information that clients want to see reported. Another challenge s to make data flexible enough to allow as-yet unknown querying and Òmining.Ó Finally, the promise of BI involves using it to help make future predictions and support good decision-making. For these reasons and more, analyzing and documenting BI requirements create the need for special knowledge and skills. This course addresses those special knowledge areas and helps build the skills of people who work on defining BI requirements. By learning a combination of industry best practices and practical approaches, attendees will improve their BI project success.

  • Credits: 2
BAC 504 Bus Intelligence Req Analysis BAC-504
  • Gathering and analyzing requirements for BI projects have several components that are unique on IT projects. One of the complexities includes uncovering and defining multiple dimensions of information that clients want to see reported. Another challenge s to make data flexible enough to allow as-yet unknown querying and Òmining.Ó Finally, the promise of BI involves using it to help make future predictions and support good decision-making. For these reasons and more, analyzing and documenting BI requirements create the need for special knowledge and skills. This course addresses those special knowledge areas and helps build the skills of people who work on defining BI requirements. By learning a combination of industry best practices and practical approaches, attendees will improve their BI project success.

  • Credits: 2
BAC 200 Business Analy Fund BAC-200
  • This course introduces people to the concept of concurrent modeling, using four standard types of models that provide the most benefits. A key skill taught is how to best read models concurrently for a complete requirements packageÓ After models are presented, class participants find inconsistencies, interview the sponsor, and document and trace new requirements that are discovered. These models are: Business Process, Use Case, Data, and Interface Modeling. Specifics of how to construct each type of model are contained in separate courses. The course concludes with considerations and techniques for organizing, prioritizing, and packaging requirements for maximum communication value. Plus, attendees also learn a repeatable process for verifying that requirements are included in the final solution.

  • Credits: 3
BAC 500 Business Analysis Fund BAC-500
  • This course introduces people to the concept of concurrent modeling, using four standard types of models that provide the most benefits. A key skill taught is how to best read models concurrently for a complete requirements packageÓ After models are presented, class participants find inconsistencies, interview the sponsor, and document and trace new requirements that are discovered. These models are: Business Process, Use Case, Data, and Interface Modeling. Specifics of how to construct each type of model are contained in separate courses. The course concludes with considerations and techniques for organizing, prioritizing, and packaging requirements for maximum communication value. Plus, attendees also learn a repeatable process for verifying that requirements are included in the final solution.

  • Credits: 3
BAC 202 Eliciting Bus Requirements BAC-202
  • In order to navigate the political landscape to meet or exceed customer expectations on any project, it is essential to efficiently and effectively gather their requirements. This course helps you develop skills and learn techniques to translate customer he project lifecycle. This course focuses on the management of the software testing lifecycle by establishing a test strategy appropriate for a given project size, complexity and technical architecture. It is applicable to a wide range of project roles, from business analysts to QA staff to application developers.

  • Credits: 2
BAC 502 Eliciting Bus Requirements BAC-502
  • In order to navigate the political landscape to meet or exceed customer expectations on any project, it is essential to efficiently and effectively gather their requirements. This course helps you develop skills and learn techniques to translate customer he project lifecycle. This course focuses on the management of the software testing lifecycle by establishing a test strategy appropriate for a given project size, complexity and technical architecture. It is applicable to a wide range of project roles, from business analysts to QA staff to application developers.

  • Credits: 2
BAC 205 Influencing Without Authority BAC-205
  • How do we establish enough influence over key stakeholders to get our work done when we have no real authority over them? We know what needs to be done and we know how to do it, yet we canÕt get our boss, our colleagues, and yes, even the people who report to us, to do the right thing.

  • Credits: 2
BAC 505 Influencing Without Authority BAC-505
  • How do we establish enough influence over key stakeholders to get our work done when we have no real authority over them? We know what needs to be done and we know how to do it, yet we canÕt get our boss, our colleagues, and yes, even the people who report to us, to do the right thing.

  • Credits: 2
BAC 201 Require Modeling Essentials BAC-201
  • Perhaps the single most challenging part of a project is getting the requirements right. This course presents many methods, tools, models, and techniques to help elicit and analyze requirements. Participants will practice eliciting, analyzing, modeling, and tracing requirements as they work through an engaging case study. In addition, attendees will learn about the importance of building relationships and trust in the requirements process as they categorize stakeholders and analyze their roles, responsibilities, and influence.

  • Credits: 2
BAC 501 Require Modeling Essentials BAC-501
  • Perhaps the single most challenging part of a project is getting the requirements right. This course presents many methods, tools, models, and techniques to help elicit and analyze requirements. Participants will practice eliciting, analyzing, modeling, and tracing requirements as they work through an engaging case study. In addition, attendees will learn about the importance of building relationships and trust in the requirements process as they categorize stakeholders and analyze their roles, responsibilities, and influence.

  • Credits: 2
BAC 203 Software Testing Fundamentals BAC-203
  • This course presents best practice methods and techniques for software testing to obtain thorough and effective testing results. Various levels and types of testing are covered. Learn techniques for efficient testing of software deliverables throughout the project lifecycle. This course focuses on the management of the software testing lifecycle by establishing a test strategy appropriate for a given project size, complexity and technical architecture. It is applicable to a wide range of project roles, from business analysts to QA staff to application developers.

  • Credits: 2
BAC 503 Software Testing Fundamentals BAC-503
  • This course presents best practice methods and techniques for software testing to obtain thorough and effective testing results. Various levels and types of testing are covered. Learn techniques for efficient testing of software deliverables throughout the project lifecycle. This course focuses on the management of the software testing lifecycle by establishing a test strategy appropriate for a given project size, complexity and technical architecture. It is applicable to a wide range of project roles, from business analysts to QA staff to application developers.

  • Credits: 2
BAC 206 Use Case Modeling BAC-206
  • This course provides the right blend of knowledge and skills for people to understand and model use cases effectively. Attendees will learn where use cases are most effective, a step-by-step method for creating them, and numerous guidelines and tips to enhance creating them. Participants also receive a comprehensive Use Case template that can be readily used back on the job.

  • Credits: 2
BAC 506 Use Case Modeling BAC-506
  • This course provides the right blend of knowledge and skills for people to understand and model use cases effectively. Attendees will learn where use cases are most effective, a step-by-step method for creating them, and numerous guidelines and tips to enhance creating them. Participants also receive a comprehensive Use Case template that can be readily used back on the job.

  • Credits: 2
BIO 230 Animal Biology and Physiology BIO-230
  • This course provides a comparative study of major animal groups within a taxonomic, morphological and physiological framework. Major topics include animal cells, animal tissues, organ systems, animal phylogeny, life cycles and development. Three lecture sessions and one three hour laboratory period per week. (Prerequisites: BIO120)

  • Credits:
BIO 120 Biology I: The Unity of Life BIO-120
  • Emphasizing inquiry and investigation, this course introduces students to the discoveries, both historical and contemporary, that support the unifying theories of modern biological science. Topics considered include the nature and methods of modern biological science; the basis of life in terms of matter, energy, cells, genetics, and reproduction; and the impact of evolution on the unity of life. The course is comprised of lectures, readings, discussions, written assignments, films, and an inquiry-based laboratory component. (Recommended prerequisites: one year of high school biology and chemistry and four years of high school mathematics)

  • Credits: 4
BIO 130 Biology II: Diversity of Life BIO-130
  • Current and competing hypotheses explaining the origin, development, and maintenance of the Earth's biodiversity are critically evaluated. Employing a phylogenetic approach and emphasizing the Eukaryote, the major lineages of life are surveyed and compared by considering evolutionary trends and the relationships between structure and function within and among lineages. Abiotic and biotic factors, including human activity, influencing populations, communities, ecosystems and the biosphere are explored. The course is comprised of lectures, readings, discussions, written assignments, films, and an inquiry-based laboratory component. (Prerequisite: BIO120; Recommended prerequisites: one year of high school biology and chemistry and four years of high school mathematics)

  • Credits: 4
BIO 102 Biology in a Box BIO-102
  • This augmented course challenges students to confront, evaluate, and integrate the major discoveries and principles of the biological sciences within their worldview as members of contemporary society. The course incorporates hands-on experiments and activities to aid in learning core concepts in biology. All required materials can be purchased as a single lab kit that comes straight to your home - in a box! Learn about biology from the tiniest cellular viewpoint all the way up to the larger scale, whole world ecological viewpoint.

  • Credits: 4
BIO 488 Biology Independent Study BIO-488
  • Independent Study courses can be designed by the student and instructor to meet special needs. Presently offered as independent study are Scientific Presentation and Bottle Biology, both one credit experiences.

  • Credits: 0
BIO 498 Biology Internship BIO-498
  • This internship is designed to provide students with a work/educational experience which will help them determine their future educational and occupational goals.

  • Credits: 2
BIO 415 Biology of Aging BIO-415
  • This 3 credit course will focus on theories of human aging from a biological perspective. The structural and functional changes that occur during the aging process will be investigated at several levels: molecular, cellular, tissue, and organ system. The symptoms and clinical management of age-related diseases will also be explored. This course is targeted for students interested in the health sciences and is required for the gerontology minor/certification. Prerequisite: BIO120 (preferred) OR BIO100

  • Credits: 3
BIO 497 Biology Teaching Assistant BIO-497
  • Students enrolled in this course will work with a faculty member to gain teaching experience in biology courses. Activities may include: designing laboratory exercises; working with students in laboratory, classroom and tutoring environment; preparing and delivering lectures; developing course materials; and grading.

  • Credits: 4
BIO 100 Biology Today BIO-100
  • This course challenges students to confront, evaluate, and integrate the major discoveries and principles of the biological sciences within their worldview as members of contemporary society. Major themes of the course include the role of genes and inheritance in human growth and development; health and behavior; human origin and relationship to the Earth's biodiversity; and human impact on, role within, and responsibility for the integrity of the biosphere. Lectures, readings, discussions, films, and laboratory activities comprise the course. (Prerequisites: none. Students planning further study in biology or other natural sciences should complete BIO120 and BIO130.)

  • Credits: 3
BIO 330 Cell Biology BIO-330
  • This course is a study of the structure and function of eukaryotic cells from a molecular viewpoint. Major topics include molecular cell structure, energy requirements of the cell, membranes and compartments of the cell, nucleus and information of the cell and specialized cellular organelle functions. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week. (Prerequisite: BIO120)

  • Credits:
BIO 320 Ecology BIO-320
  • This course provides the opportunity to study the inter-relationships between organisms, both plant and animal and their environment. These studies include intraspecies and interspecies relationships. The lab consists of field study techniques, collecting, analyzing and interpreting data. Thee lecture/discussion sections and one three hour laboratory period per week. (Prerequisite: BIO120 and BIO130, Recommended: MAT110).

  • Credits:
BIO 210 Genetics BIO-210
  • This course is a study of the principles of heredity based upon concepts and principles of the gene. Major topics include Mendelian genetics, sex determination and sex linkage, gene mapping, structure and function of DNA, translation, transcription, recombinant DNA technology, chromosome mutations and aberrations, transposons, extra nuclear genomes and quantitative genetics. Problem solving will be emphasized. Three lecture/discussion sections and one three hour laboratory period per week. (Prerequisite: BIO120)

  • Credits: 4
BIO 316 Human Anatomy & Physiology II BIO-316
  • This course is part two of a study of the structure and function of the human body. Major topics include the autonomic nerves and special senses and endocrine, respiratory, digestive, immune, metabolism, reproductive and urinary systems. Three lectures and one three hour lab period per week. (Prerequisite: BIO120 or instructor consent)

  • Credits: 4
BIO 315 Human Anatomy and Physiology I BIO-315
  • This course is part one of a study of the structure and function of the human body. Major topics include the introduction to the human body, cells, tissues and skeletal, muscle, nervous and cardiovascular systems. Three lectures and one three hour lab period per week. (Prerequisite: BIO120)

  • Credits:
BIO 440 Human Gross Anatomy BIO-440
  • This course is a comprehensive study of human anatomy which includes dissection of a human cadaver. Skeletal, muscular, nervous, digestive, cardiovascular, respiratory, and urogenital systems will be covered, and emphasis will be placed on the relatedness of structure and function.

  • Credits: 4
BIO 430 Immunology BIO-430
  • This course provides a comprehensive study of the immune system. Major topics include passive immunity, cell-mediated immunity, humoral immunity, autoimmune diseases, vaccination strategies and other medically relevant topics. (Prerequisite: BIO330)

  • Credits: 3
BIO 350 Medical Terminology BIO-350
  • This course will help students learn the components of medical terms. Students will learn the basic elements of words, such as roots, prefixes, suffixes, combining vowels, and combining forms in order to understand, the word's meaning. Students will be able to apply the meaning of the word to an anatomical structure, physiological function or pathology, the course will be mainly online but with several scheduled face-to-face meetings for discussion and examination.

  • Credits: 2
BIO 300 Microbiology BIO-300
  • This course explores the nature and diversity of microorganisms by considering their structural, functional, ecological and taxonomic relationships. Major topics include microbial structure and growth, metabolism, environmental and ecological interactions, viruses, genetics and representative prokaryotic groups. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week. (Prerequisite: BIO120)

  • Credits:
BIO 435 Molecular Biol Tech Adv Lab BIO-435
  • This course provides the students with an opportunity to master a number of molecular biology techniques that are currently used in research laboratories. Major topics may include DNA isolation, polymerase chain reaction, DNA sequencing, recombinant DNA technology and cloning methods, DNA and protein gel electrophoresis, protein purification, and Western blot analysis. There will be focus given to reading and analyzing the scientific literature and writing scientific articles based on the lab. Four hours laboratory/lecture periods per week. (Prerequisite: BIO210)

  • Credits: 4
BIO 460 Neuroscience BIO-460
  • This course introduces the rapid growing field of neuroscience. The course covers topics ranging from neuronal structure and function, synaptic communication and signaling, gross organization of the brain and spinal cord, to sensory and motor responses as well as higher functions such as learning, memory, and cognition.

  • Credits: 4
BIO 220 Plant Biology BIO-220
  • This course is a study of botany based primarily upon morphological and physiological concepts and principles. Major topics include the plant cell; the ontogeny, structure and physiology of plant tissues and organs; and the forms, phylogeny and life cycles of representative plant groups. Three lecture/demonstration sessions and one two-hour laboratory period per week.

  • Credits: 0
BIO 456 Research in Biology BIO-456
  • This course offers students an opportunity to do original research in an area of expertise of one of the biology faculty members. When applicable, the research will be followed with presentation of a poster or a paper at a research symposium.(Prerequisite: BIO120)

  • Credits: 4
BIO 455 Research Proposal BIO-455
  • This course provides the foundation for the Research in Biology Course (BIO456). The students will engage in a literature survey of research in the instructor's area of expertise and develop a research proposal consisting of a research hypothesis, a rationale for the work and experimental design. Course will meet one hour per week. (Open to students in the last two years of study and with instructor consent. Students will plan to complete BIO456 in the following semester with the same instructor.)

  • Credits: 1
BIO 340 Science Issues and Ethics BIO-340
  • This course includes a short introduction to the study of philosophy and ethics, followed by critical analyses of current issues in health and environmental sciences. Ethical discussions are framed in a solid understanding of the science behind each topic. The course will include a variety of formats, including reading and reviewing papers and/or texts, analyzing case studies, and participating in class discussions. (Prerequisite: BIO120 and CHE115).

  • Credits: 4
BIO 450 Special Topics in Biology BIO-450
  • The topic for this course will vary each semester, chosen from a wide range of current research in biology. Students will read background material, participate in discussions and complete writing assignments as directed by the instructor. This course will meet for one lecture/discussion hour per week. (Prerequisite: BIO120)

  • Credits: 1
BPM 103 Business Process Improvement BPM-103
  • This course explores the need for a business process focus, the essential steps for process improvement, and the critical success factors for making the effort successful. It provides a practical framework for improving process and describes many tried and true process improvement concepts and techniques. Lastly, it provides valuable tips and techniques to introduce process changes effectively, to get the most from your process improvement effort. Presented in a methodology-neutral way, participants can easily apply the knowledge and skills to any environment, and use the techniques immediately upon leaving class.

  • Credits: 2
BPM 503 Business Process Improvement BPM-503
  • This course explores the need for a business process focus, the essential steps for process improvement, and the critical success factors for making the effort successful. It provides a practical framework for improving process and describes many tried and true process improvement concepts and techniques. Lastly, it provides valuable tips and techniques to introduce process changes effectively, to get the most from your process improvement effort. Presented in a methodology-neutral way, participants can easily apply the knowledge and skills to any environment, and use the techniques immediately upon leaving class.

  • Credits: 2
BPM 101 Business Process Modeling BPM-101
  • To harness the work done in organizations, and to increase productivity, it is essential to understand how to model business processes. This course explores the need for modeling business processes, how process modeling is one part of a larger framework for achieving higher quality through Business Process Management, the essential steps to process modeling, and the critical success factors for making the effort successful. It provides a practical framework for understanding and modeling business processes and describes how to develop a variety of process model types.

  • Credits: 2
BPM 501 Business Process Modeling BPM-501
  • To harness the work done in organizations, and to increase productivity, it is essential to understand how to model business processes. This course explores the need for modeling business processes, how process modeling is one part of a larger framework for achieving higher quality through Business Process Management, the essential steps to process modeling, and the critical success factors for making the effort successful. It provides a practical framework for understanding and modeling business processes and describes how to develop a variety of process model types.

  • Credits: 2
BPM 100 Getting Started/Bus Proc Mgmt BPM- 100
  • To maintain competitiveness in local and international markets, it is increasingly essential to formally manage your business processes. This course explores the need for a business process focus, the essential steps for process management, and the critical success factors for making the effort successful. It provides a practical framework for understanding process and describes tried and true process management concepts and techniques. It explains the foundation of using and developing metrics, and it describes the role of the Process Owner, the most crucial member of a Business Process Management effort. Presented in a methodology-neutral way, participants can easily apply the knowledge and skills to any environment, and use the techniques immediately upon leaving class. Class, team, and individual exercises provide practice based on information gleaned from a detailed case study. It is also the foundation for other BPM courses.

  • Credits: 1
BPM 500 Getting Started/Bus Proc Mgmt BPM- 500
  • To maintain competitiveness in local and international markets, it is increasingly essential to formally manage your business processes. This course explores the need for a business process focus, the essential steps for process management, and the critical success factors for making the effort successful. It provides a practical framework for understanding process and describes tried and true process management concepts and techniques. It explains the foundation of using and developing metrics, and it describes the role of the Process Owner, the most crucial member of a Business Process Management effort. Presented in a methodology-neutral way, participants can easily apply the knowledge and skills to any environment, and use the techniques immediately upon leaving class. Class, team, and individual exercises provide practice based on information gleaned from a detailed case study. It is also the foundation for other BPM courses.

  • Credits: 1
BUS 360 Accounting and Budgeting BUS-360
  • This course explains the financial implications of business management and includes both the principles of accounting and the principles of finance.

  • Credits: 4
BUS 210 Adult Lrng Theory for Trainers BUS-210
  • This course introduces the unique perspectives of the adult learner. Participants will gain knowledge in self-directedness, learning styles, learnerÕs motivations, and how new learning can trigger transformational experiences. Participants will also explore adult development as it relates to learning.

  • Credits: 4
BUS 345 Business Analytics BUS-345
  • In this course students will apply tools and concepts from mathematics and statistics to learn a portfolio of tools used in business. These tools include probability analysis and hypothesis testing. Students will be introduced to the growing field of Business Intelligence and Data Analytics. Topics include data mining, text mining, business intelligence architecture, data reporting systems and data visualization tools.

  • Credits: 4
BUS 340 Business Analytics I BUS-340
  • In this course students will apply tools and concepts from mathematics and statistics to learn a portfolio of tools used in business. Mathematical and statistical concepts include descriptive statistics, mathematical modeling, ratios and percentages, probability and counting rules, probability and decision analysis, hypothesis testing, correlation, regression, chi-square, and analysis-of-variance.

  • Credits: 4
BUS 440 Business Analytics II BUS-440
  • In this course students will be introduced to the growing field of Business Intelligence and Data Analytics. Topics include data mining, text mining, business intelligence architecture, data reporting systems and data visualization tools.

  • Credits: 4
BUS 450 Business Analytics II BUS-450
  • In this course students will learn to use various tools to analyze data and make predictions. These tools include probability analysis, hypothesis testing, regression analysis, linear programming and tools for financial analysis.

  • Credits: 4
BUS 492 Business Capstone BUS-492
  • This course is the culminating experience in business and business-related undergraduate programs and is designed to guide students through a process of synthesis.

  • Credits: 4
BUS 330 Business Economics BUS-330
  • Analytical approaches and tools of the economics discipline are introduced and used to examine current issues and problems that arise in the functioning of economic systems. Microeconomic and Macroeconomic tools, concepts and theories will be applied to analyze real world problems from a variety of perspectives.

  • Credits: 4
BUS 430 Business Law and Ethics BUS-430
  • This course examines the legal aspects of business, the ethics of business, and the connection between the two.

  • Credits: 4
BUS 490 Business Strategies BUS-490
  • In this course students will apply core business skills and their ethical framework for decision making to solve real world challenges through various techniques such as case studies, business plans and field work.

  • Credits: 4
BUS 420 Corporate Finance BUS-420
  • This course explores the basics of financial management. Topics include the capital markets, the cash budget, pro forma statements, analysis of financial statements, and the time value of money Students also complete a research project.

  • Credits: 4
BUS 285 Emotional Intellignc in Ldrshp BUS-285
  • Why are those with the highest IQs not necessarily the most successful in their personal and business lives? The latest research into factors that distinguish successful individuals tends to show that ÒEQÓ or Emotional Intelligence is the more significant factor. This applies both to personal success and to bottom-line company performance of companies whose leaders have high ÒEQ.Ó This is something we recognize intuitivelyÑthe people we like to work with are those who both understand and effectively manage their emotions and are able to discern the emotions of others in order to develop the most rewarding relationships.

  • Credits: 2
BUS 350 Innovative Marketing BUS-350
  • This course provides an introduction to the study of marketing, e-commerce, and social media in business and other organizations.

  • Credits: 4
BUS 445 International Management BUS-445
  • This course focuses on the practice of managing business operations in more than one country. Topics include the language, culture, economic and political environment, and business practices of countries in which multinational firms actively trade and invest.

  • Credits: 4
BUS 287 Intro to Personal Coaching BUS-287
  • This course explores personal life coaching while discussing the distinctions between coaching, mentoring, and counseling. An introduction to coaching concepts and skills is discussed while exploring the many coaching Òniches.Ó Students apply coaching concepts to personal and organizational situations.

  • Credits: 3
BUS 282 Leadership Ethics BUS-282
  • Is it possible to lead without ethics? Is there a lesson to be learned from the Enrons and World Coms we have heard so much about? This course focuses on leadership ethics Ð what, how, and why. Learn about and test your own ethical values Ð apply your ethics to current cases from the business world. Learn the impact of ethical leaderships on others, and the cost of unethical leadership. Learn to let your ethics be your rudder in life.

  • Credits: 3
BUS 281 Leadership Process BUS-281
  • Leadership is often incorrectly interpreted as a position within an organization. This course provides a tremendous source of theoretical concepts and examples to improve leadership behaviors.

  • Credits: 3
BUS 410 Operations, Techn & Qual Mgmt BUS-410
  • This course will discuss the theoretical foundations for production management. The course will focus on the management of resources such as the production process, the management of equipment and machinery, facilities and maintenance, materials management, inventory control, quality control, scheduling, and purchasing. The course will also introduce students to theories and tools for quality management and the management of technology and information systems.

  • Credits: 4
BUS 310 Organizational Behavior BUS-310
  • Organizations are complex entities and understanding them is important for students in business programs. This course investigates the impact of individuals, groups, the structures, and the environments of organizations.

  • Credits: 4
BUS 497 Study Abroad BUS-497
  • International travel course that supports students' program learning with first-hand experience. Students explore business topics of interest, such as marketing, management, leadership or operations from an international perspective.

  • Credits: 4
BUS 597 Study Abroad BUS-597
  • This international travel course supports students' program learning with first-hand experience.

  • Credits: 4
BUS 283 Supervisory Leadership Tools BUS-283
  • Every leader can benefit from improved supervisory skills. This course focuses on some of the basic skills necessary to be an effective manager or supervisor. Effective communication will be applied to the topics of facilitating teams, delegation, and how to coach employees at different performance levels. Students will apply these concepts to personal and organizational situations.

  • Credits: 3
BUS 280 Topics in Leadership BUS-280
  • To achieve a true understanding of leadership, it is necessary to look back at how the various theories of leadership and management have developed, changed, and coincided with the needs of the workplace at the time they were popular. This course explores the development of leadership theory as a means of understanding the current concepts. Application of various theories are also examined.

  • Credits: 3

C

CHD 460 Behavior Guidance in EC CHD-460
  • In this course, students examine the concept of mistaken behavior, and the levels of mistaken behavior. How to promote an encouraging classroom is discussed. The short- and long-term effects of logical and natural consequences for prosocial development are reviewed.

  • Credits: 3
CHD 630 Best Practices in Early Chldhd CHD-630
  • This class provides the theoretical framework and best practices for working in early childhood settings. Learners examine how individualized curriculum and environment can be integrated through developmentally appropriate practices in order to promote the cognitive and social development of children.

  • Credits: 2
CHD 330 Best Practices in EC CHD-330
  • This class provides the theoretical framework and best practices for working in early childhood settings. Learners examine how individualized curriculum and environment can be integrated through developmentally appropriate practices in order to promote the cognitive and social development of children.

  • Credits: 4
CHD 411 Child Social & Emotional Grwth CHD-411
  • This course studies the social, psychological and emotional growth of children from prenatal to elementary ages. Issues of attachment, perspective-taking and friendship are discussed.

  • Credits: 3
CHD 450 Children’s Literature CHD-450
  • Using children's books to develop literature-based curriculum is the emphasis of this course. There is a review of authors of children's literature and an exploration of books for a variety of purposes.

  • Credits: 3
CHD 440 Children’s Play and Learning CHD-440
  • Theories of Piaget, Parton, Erickson, and Vygotsky are studied to determine how children learn to play and the effect that play has on the child's development. Historical perspectives and effects of play on learning are reviewed.

  • Credits: 3
CHD 435 DAP in ECE CHD-435
  • This is a historical, present, and future perspective of developmentally appropriate practices. Appropriate classroom practices and current topics are discussed.

  • Credits: 3
CHD 451 Dual Language Learners CHD-451
  • This course will address the needs of the early childhood classroom professional. The course will move beyond the basics of child development to help educators understand the natural progression of second-language acquisition in young children.

  • Credits: 3
CHD 461 Ethics in Early Childhood CHD-461
  • Classical and historical ethics are explored, as well as the studentÕs personal values system. Individuals face tough ethical decisions with increasing frequency in our society and a framework for addressing those questions is needed. Each student will develop a system for making ethical decisions in their personal and professional life.

  • Credits: 3
CHD 610 Growth & Dev of Children CHD-610
  • This is a broad sketch of human growth and development from pre-natal stages to elementary age. Developmental processes are studied from a biological and developmental perspective. Personality development and the effects of temperament on learning are discussed.

  • Credits: 4
CHD 310 Growth/Development Child CHD-310
  • This is a broad sketch of human growth and development from pre-natal stages to elementary age. Developmental processes are studied from a biological and developmental perspective. Personality development and the effects of temperament on learning are discussed.

  • Credits: 4
CHD 410 Growth/Development Child CHD-410
  • This is a broad sketch of human growth and development from pre-natal stages to elementary age. Developmental processes are studied from a biological and developmental perspective. Personality development and the effects of temperament on learning are discussed.

  • Credits: 3
CHD 422 Human Diversity & Relations CHD-422
  • The purpose of this course is to expand our understanding of the influences of gender, culture, economic situation, learning styles, and language on the socialization of children, and then how to use this new understanding to form the way we program for and interact with children.

  • Credits: 3
CHD 430 Infants and Toddlers CHD-430
  • In this course, students will study the emerging skills and developmental characteristics of infants and toddlers. Course topics include environments that foster development, appropriate practices, and promoting the development of autonomy.

  • Credits: 3
CHD 400 Intro to ECE CHD-400
  • This seminar helps students grasp the breadth, depth, and foundations of early childhood education.

  • Credits: 3
CHD 445 Language Development/Literacy CHD-445
  • The research and stages of language development from birth through age seven are extensively explored. Students will understand how to guide children through the language acquisition process.

  • Credits: 3
CHD 261 Meaning of Inclusion: Implicat CHD-261
  • This course examines inclusion as both a philosophy and a real-time practice. The course offers a look at the benefits and challenges to including children with special needs in community settings.

  • Credits: 1
CHD 470 Parent Ed- Methods/Materials CHD-470
  • This course explores the issues of educating parents. Parenting is a process, and has a variety of rights, responsibilities, and roles that change across the life span. Needs of parents, the resources available, and the helpful interactions between the parent and the educator are discussed. Variations in parenting practices based on heritage, culture, and ethnicity are also reviewed.

  • Credits: 4
CHD 490 Portfolio and Synthesis CHD-490
  • This final course is designed to help learners reflect on all they have done in the BA program. Through guest speakers, research study, and reflection on practice, students will synthesize all they have learned. Preparation of a professional portfolio will cap the learning experience.

  • Credits: 3
CHD 320 Role Early Childhood Educator CHD-320
  • This foundational course discusses the roots of early childhood education and the purposes of early childhood in today's society. The historical and present role of adults within the field of early childhood will be examined. Learners will explore NAEYC's code of ethics and its implications for the profession.

  • Credits: 4
CHD 620 Role Early Childhood Educator CHD-620
  • This foundational course discusses the roots of early childhood education and the purposes of early childhood in today's society. The historical and present role of adults within the field of early childhood will be examined. Learners will explore NAEYC's code of ethics and its implications for the profession.

  • Credits: 4
CHD 402 Writing for Educators CHD-402
  • Early childhood staff of all levels (directors, teachers, assistants, aides, family child care, etc.) must demonstrate professionalism as strong communicators not only verbally, but as writers, as well. This course will lay the ground work of writing expectations in the program, and serve to remediate as needed.

  • Credits: 3
CHD 482 Young Child with Special Needs CHD-482
  • This course is designed to introduce the student to the information and techniques needed to develop curricula and instruction to meet the unique needs of individual children in early childhood settings. Special emphasis is given to the theories, research, and practical application from the fields of both early childhood education and special education.

  • Credits: 3
CHE 431 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry CHE-431
  • Introduction to ligand field theory, group theory, organometallics, and catalysis. This lecture course will provide students with an introductory look at appropriate molecular theories and related descriptive chemistry. (Prerequisites: CHE115, CHE116, CHE321, CHE326, MAT135, MAT255, PHS221, PHS222, or permission of instructor.)

  • Credits: 3
CHE 326 Analytical Chemistry I CHE-326
  • Introduction to the wet and instrumental techniques of analytical chemistry. Emphasis on Gravimetric and Volumetric Analysis, Statistical Evaluation of Data and Quality Assurance. Three lectures (150 minutes) and one four-hour laboratory period per week. (Prerequisite: CHE116)

  • Credits: 4
CHE 328 Biochemistry CHE-328
  • Molecular determinants of structure and function of biomolecules. Biological processes at the molecular level. Enzyme catalysis, bioenergetics, and metabolism. Three lectures (150 minutes) and one laboratory period (180 minutes) per week. (Prerequisite: CHE221)

  • Credits: 0
CHE 110 Chemistry in Perspective CHE-110
  • Chemistry principles will be developed on a need to know basis within the context of selected societal problems. Class format will encourage students to contribute knowledge from non-scientific fields to expand the base of applicability. This course is especially designed for the non-science major and may not be used for credit in any of the science majors or minors. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory period per week.

  • Credits: 0
CHE 498 Chemistry Internship CHE-498
  • The internship is designed to provide students with a work/educational experience that may help determine future educational and occupational goals.

  • Credits: 2
CHE 456 Chemistry Research CHE-456
  • This course offers students an opportunity to do original research in an area of expertise of one of the chemistry faculty members. When applicable, the research will be followed with presentation of a paper at an undergraduate research conferences and submission of a paper for publication. Two to three hours of laboratory and/or library work per credit per week.

  • Credits: 0
CHE 497 Chemistry Teaching Assistant CHE-497
  • Students enrolled in this course will work with a faculty member to gain teaching experience in chemistry courses. Activities may include: designing laboratory exercises; working with students in laboratory, classroom and tutoring environment; preparing and delivering lectures; developing course materials; grading.

  • Credits: 4
CHE 330 Dietary Biochemistry CHE-330
  • Examination of the digestion and utilization of macromolecules from a biochemical viewpoint. Metabolic pathway activation/regulation via diet. Factors influencing macromolecule content of common foodstuffs. (Prerequisite: CHE328)

  • Credits: 4
CHE 230 Environmental Chemistry CHE-230
  • This course considers the chemistry of earth's natural environment: air, water, and soil. Systems will be examined to contrast their natural chemistries with potential environmental pollution effects. Three lectures per week and several field trips are taken to various laboratories. (Prerequisite: CHE116)

  • Credits: 3
CHE 115 General Chemistry I CHE-115
  • Systematic introduction to the conceptual and symbolic aspects of chemistry. Critical and quantitative thought as applied to the topics of measurement, formula and equation writing, stoichiometry, atomic structure and periodicity, bonding and molecular geometry, gases, phases and phase changes. Brief introduction to Organic Chemistry. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory period per week. (Prerequisites: High School chemistry and one year of algebra or consent of instructor)

  • Credits: 4
CHE 116 General Chemistry II CHE-116
  • Continuation of General Chemistry 1. Solutions and Colligative Properties, Equilibrium, Thermodynamics, Qualitative Analysis, Kinetics, Reduction, Oxidation, Nuclear Chemistry. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory period per week. (Prerequisite: CHE115)

  • Credits: 4
CHE 141 Household Chemistry CHE-141
  • A general education course emphasizing applications of chemistry to daily living. Topics range from baking to medications, from cleaning to cosmetics and from secrets under the sink to close encounters with clothing. Hands-on lab activities supplement the topics. (Prerequisites: A high school chemistry course and access to a kitchen and basic utensils)

  • Credits: 0
CHE 221 Organic Chemistry I CHE-221
  • This course is an introductory study of organic compounds using a functional group approach and stressing basic principles. Topics covered include the covalence of carbon, isomerism, stereoisomerism and the structure, properties, nomenclature and reactions of the common functional groups. The determination of molecular structure is introduced. (Prerequisite: CHE116)

  • Credits: 0
CHE 222 Organic Chemistry II CHE-222
  • This course is a continuation of Organic Chemistry I. Topics covered include additional functional group chemistry, reaction mechanisms, heterocyclic compounds, proteins, lipids and synthetic macromolecules. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week. (Prerequisite: CHE221)

  • Credits: 0
CHE 341 Physical Chemistry CHE-341
  • This course is an introduction to fundamental topics in physical chemistry, including quantum theory, electronic structure, computational chemistry, thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. (Prerequisite: CHE116)

  • Credits: 4
CHE 150 Real World Chemistry CHE-150
  • This general education course explores applications of chemistry outside of the laboratory to typical living environments. This includes chemicals used in the kitchen, garage, bathroom and work places. Hands-on lab activities supplement the topics.

  • Credits: 4
CHE 450 Special Topics in Chemistry CHE-450
  • The topic for this course will be chosen from a wide range of current research and development in chemistry. Students will read background material, participate in discussions, and complete labs and/or writing assignments as instructed.

  • Credits: 1
CHM 430 Child & Confirmation Ministry CHM-430
  • Current and emerging theories of childrenÕs ministry serve as the foundation for developing engaging childrenÕs ministry practices, experiences and programs. Additionally, students research and plan effective approaches to confirmation programming. There is a fieldwork component to this course.

  • Credits: 4
CHM 499 Commiss. Ministry Internshp II CHM-499
  • The internship provides DCE and DCO students a full-time supervised involvement in the educational or outreach ministries of a cooperating congregation or cross-cultural organization. Emphasis is placed on active leadership in a variety of professional tasks. Students register for CHM498 in the fall and CHM499 in the spring to complete the 12-month internship.

  • Credits: 6
CHM 498 Commissioned Ministry Intern I CHM-498
  • The internship provides DCE and DCO students a full-time supervised involvement in the educational or outreach ministries of a cooperating congregation or cross-cultural organization. Emphasis is placed on active leadership in a variety of professional tasks. Students register for CHM498 in the fall and CHM499 in the spring to complete the 12-month internship.

  • Credits: 6
CHM 473 Cross-Cultural Outreach CHM-473
  • Students are introduced to the world of cross-cultural mission work in foreign fields and in the United States. The course provides theories and strategies for effectively proclaiming the Gospel to peoples of different cultures. The course will address cross-cultural insights in foreign, ethnic and social-economic contexts and includes field trips to government-funded and private organizations working in cross-cultural contexts, language learning insights and an African feast.

  • Credits: 4
CHM 330 Cultural Context & Faith Devlp CHM-330
  • Students study the practice of Christian ministry within different cultural contexts and across the lifespan, paying particular attention to applying principles of biblical interpretation and a Lutheran understanding of Law and Gospel to the design and implementation of ministry experiences. Through applied projects, students develop a commitment to a reflective practice that respects diverse voices and beliefs.

  • Credits: 4
CHM 361 DCE Practicum CHM-361
  • The student seeking certification as a Director of Christian Education is assigned to a Lutheran school in order to teach religion, assist in planning and leading chapels, conduct devotions, and observe the ministry of the Lutheran school and the Lutheran classroom teacher.

  • Credits: 2
CHM 321 Found for Teaching & Learning CHM-321
  • Students explore the scriptural, theological and historical role of Christian education within the church. This exploration will equip students to teach the faith across the lifespan through an intentional implementation of Christian educational programs and experiences.

  • Credits: 4
CHM 450 Great Commission Congregations CHM-450
  • Students explore a strategic, team-based approach to congregational outreach and discipleship. By means of classroom and field experiences a multi-phase model is explored, developed and applied to a chosen contextual setting. There is a fieldwork component to this course.

  • Credits: 4
CHM 268 Intro. to Christian Ministry CHM-268
  • Through an exploration of scriptural, theological, historical and social foundations of Christian ministry, students work to develop a personal philosophy of ministry. In addition, students study and utilize essential leadership skills for effective Christian ministry practice and service. As a major project throughout the course, students develop a professional Christian ministry portfolio.

  • Credits: 2
CHM 323 Leadership Foundations CHM-323
  • Developing their biblical and theological foundations for the practice of Christian leadership within diverse and changing faith communities, students explore leadership models and theories essential for guiding Christian ministry organizations into the future. Students gain administrative and productivity skills essential for organizational leadership.

  • Credits: 4
CHM 369 Outdoor Ministry Practicum CHM-369
  • The practicum experience takes place in a Lutheran camp for those who have been selected and hired as counselors for the summer camp setting. In addition to the on-site training, support and guidance is provided through a university instructor.

  • Credits: 2
CHM 366 Parish Education I CHM-366
  • Through class discussion, readings, presentation and involvement in Christian education agencies in a local congregation, students grow in understanding the purpose and function of life-long parish educational ministries. Various approaches to religious and Christian education will be studied with particular application to the Lutheran setting. (Required concurrent registration in CVM 370.)

  • Credits: 3
CHM 367 Parish Education II CHM-367
  • Students observe and participate in a broad range of educational, youth, music, family, adult and children's activities in an assigned local parish while having opportunity to explore the theory and literature of the field. Students are expected to develop knowledge and skills to develop as an educational leader. This course will introduce various models for the delivery of Christian education in the parish community. Participants will explore teaching the faith, utilizing Scripture and Luther's Small Catechism as a foundation throughout the life span and will explore various ways to provide Christian education in the contemporary setting. One area for intensive leadership involvement is selected, designed and carried to completion. Class sessions provide opportunity for sharing insights, experiences and concerns with other students and the instructor. A discussion of relevant subjects and literature is included. (Required concurrent registration in CHM 371.)

  • Credits: 3
CHM 445 Pract of Missions 21st Century CHM-445
  • Students explore the basic tenets of living a mission-focused lifestyle in various cultures and contexts in North America and around the world by becoming familiar with issues related to crossing cultural barriers. These include culture shock; spiritual, physical, and emotional health; learning language and culture; team development; and integrative vocational practices. There is a fieldwork component to this course.

  • Credits: 4
CHM 368 Pre-Internship CHM-368
  • Through class discussion, readings, presentations and retreats the student is prepared to structure and begin a DCE Internship.

  • Credits: 2
CHM 281 Princ. for Christian Outreach CHM-281
  • This course is an overview of outreach principles and strategies. Specific attention will be given to those factors in the life and activity of the church which hinder or enhance its growth. Included in the overview will be an analysis of the life and activity of a Christian congregation, steps toward mobilizing the laity, the development of a church growth consciousness, basic planning procedures for church growth, church planting theory and strategies, and basic cross-cultural insights.

  • Credits: 4
CHM 433 Role of the DCE CHM-433
  • The role of the Director of Christian Education as an educational minister is explored and considered. Calling and placement procedures, professional ethics and expectation, the constitution and by-laws of The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod, role of the DCE in Synod and District, and the role of the DCE in team ministry are examined. The professional portfolio is completed and ready for final interview review by faculty and field professionals as part of the certification process.

  • Credits: 2
CHM 440 Speaking the Gospel CHM-440
  • Students explore the practical application of models of personal witness and Christian apologetics through the development of skills in nurturing relationships, recognizing barriers to and opportunities for faith-sharing, dealing with fears, listening actively, and effectively applying Law and Gospel to the needs of the hearer. There is a fieldwork component to this course.

  • Credits: 4
CHM 325 Strategic Ministry CHM-325
  • Christian ministry in diverse and fluid cultures calls for strategic and intentional leadership. Students explore and apply current strategic planning theories, methods and tools to help Christian ministry organizations fulfill their missions within ever-changing communities and cultural contexts. Through case study analysis and projects, students apply organizational change theory to congregations and ministry organizations.

  • Credits: 4
CHM 435 Teaching & Leading Adults CHM-435
  • Adult learning theory serves as a foundation for the development of adult education programs and experiences. Throughout this course students explore and apply theories of adult learning, spiritual formation, effective teaching methods and adult spiritual direction strategies. Participants utilize a planning process for initiating and leading adult education programs in ministry settings. There is a fieldwork component to this course.

  • Credits: 4
CHM 421 Teaching to Lead and Equip CHM-421
  • Effective ministry requires teams of transformational leaders. Educators and other leaders in the church serve and lead in ways that equip and empower others to serve within their local congregations, communities and beyond. Reflective practice helps leaders shape educational experiences that equip learners to serve and volunteer within diverse and rich cultural settings. Through applied projects and research, students design volunteer ministry programs and leadership training experiences. There is a fieldwork component to this course.

  • Credits: 4
CHM 490 Theory to Action: Capstone CHM-490
  • Students reflect on and formalize their understanding of Christian ministry in the context of their personal identity in Christ, the broader ministry of the Gospel, and their vision of future ministry and personal growth. Students prepare and present a capstone Christian Ministry project.

  • Credits: 2
CHM 455 Urban Outreach CHM-455
  • Students develop an understanding and appreciation for the distinct outreach opportunities available in 21st century urban centers. Through classroom experience and interaction with cooperative agencies, a theological perspective is developed that moves students to connect entrepreneurial practices and evangelistic ministry. There is a fieldwork component to this course.

  • Credits: 4
CHM 425 Youth and Family Ministry CHM-425
  • Youth and family ministry is a partnership within congregation, home and community. Grounded in baptismal theology, this ministry is a tending of the faith journey throughout the lifespan. Students develop skills to lead a relational and Christ-centered ministry for and with youth in a congregation. There is a fieldwork component to this course.

  • Credits: 4
CI 564 Assess, Eval & Supervision CI-564
  • Administration and analysis of individual and group assessments and strategies for supervising literacy programs and communicating student progress.

  • Credits: 3
CI 560 Curric & Instr in Literacy CI-560
  • An examination of the history of the school curriculum, the fundamentals of curriculum design, and methods of implementation for literacy.

  • Credits: 3
CI 554 Curriculum and Instruction CI-554
  • An examination of the history of the school curriculum, the fundamentals of curriculum design, and methods of implementation as well as the theory and practice of the developmentally effective classroom.

  • Credits: 3
CI 552 Curriculum Theory CI-552
  • An examination of the history of the school curriculum, the fundamentals of curriculum design, and methods of implementation.

  • Credits: 3
CI 561 Foundations of Literacy CI-561
  • A survey of the historical and theoretical development of literacy education and expectations for becoming an effective literacy teacher.

  • Credits: 3
CI 550 History of Ideas in Education CI-550
  • A review of the ideas and philosophies, past and present, which influence educational practices.

  • Credits: 3
CI 553 Instructional Strategies CI-553
  • Theory and strategies of designing technology-rich environments to support active learning in schools.

  • Credits: 3
CI 555 Instructional Technology CI-555
  • Theory and strategies for designing technology-rich environments to support active learning in schools.

  • Credits: 3
CI 562 Literacy Strat for Grades K-6 CI-562
  • An investigation of literature and effective literacy strategies for the elementary classroom.

  • Credits: 3
CI 563 Literacy Strat Grades 7-12 CI-563
  • A review of adolescent literature and effective literacy strategies for learners in grades 7-12.

  • Credits: 3
CI 551 Psychology of Lrng and Tchg CI-551
  • The course reviews the development of children and the differences among their development, theories of learning, motivation of students for learning, classroom instruction and student management, and the assessment of student learning in schools. The course invites our contemplation over the following question: In light of how children learn, how shall we best teach?

  • Credits: 3
CIT 505 Design/Implement Ed Tech CIT-505
  • An examination of how to best enhance student achievement through effective incorporation of various software and hardware.

  • Credits: 3
CIT 500 Found/Trends in Ed Tech CIT-500
  • A survey of the historical and theoretical development of educational technology and an examination of future trends in K-12 education.

  • Credits: 3
CIT 515 Prof Dev & Ldrshp in Ed Tech CIT-515
  • A focus on leadership and professional development in planning and integrating educational technology.

  • Credits: 3
CIT 510 Utiliz Social Media Classroom CIT-510
  • The study of various social media modes to engage the learner and enhance instruction

  • Credits: 3
CJU 584 Accessing CJ Resources CJU-584
  • This course familiarizes students with online academic and professional criminal justice leadership periodical indexes. Students will employ secondary research techniques in a criminal justice topic area of their choice. Students will evaluate and ethically report the body of research and informational landscape related to the topic in APA style. Students will learn to integrate knowledge navigation into academic, professional, and personal application. Students will also reflect on program objectives and personal learning and identify a direct link between the new knowledge they have acquired and their career field. Students will also begin steps to set up their final project (E-folio) due at the end of the masterÕs program.

  • Credits: 4
CJU 500 Admin of Criminal Justice CJU-500
  • This course is a scholarly consideration of the concepts, principles, and analytical tools for effectively administering criminal justice agencies. Students will examine the critical application of strategic management skills in operational environments that are ever-changing, under intensive scrutiny by the public and media, and limited by legal, financial, and political constraints.

  • Credits: 4
CJU 570 Applied Ethics in CJ Ldrshp CJU-570
  • This course will review and analyze popular models of ethical decision making and problems criminal justice professionals face every day. Readings, case studies, and written assignments will provide opportunities to investigate current ethical issues facing criminal justice leaders and managers in organizational settings, as well as critically apply various ethical theories and decision-making frameworks. Discussions relative to Christian vocation, applied ethics, and value-centered leadership will be explored. Weekly written assignments will demonstrate the integration of a personal and vocation ethic.

  • Credits: 4
CJU 699 Communication in Leadership CJU-699
  • This course familiarizes students with the four principles of interpersonal communication Ð communication is inescapable, irreversible, complicated, and contextual. Communication is the cornerstone to understanding and far too often leaders in the 21st Century lack proper understanding of empowering and inspirational dialogue with coworkers. Students will gain knowledge how to hone their skills and develop into leaders that employees will follow and trust.

  • Credits: 4
CJU 452 Constitutional Law for CJ CJU-452
  • This course will develop the understanding and working knowledge of constitutional law that professionals in this field are expected to have. Students will review constitutional history and basic concepts to understand interpretations of the Constitution by the United States Supreme Court impacting criminal justice, and learn practical research strategies to find law.

  • Credits: 4
CJU 543 Contemp Issues in CJ Ldrshp CJU-543
  • This course examines stress from a leadership perspective by asking why and how employers should respond to mental health issues. Theory, research, and trends in employee assistance are discussed as students consider how employers can help prevent, mitigate, and respond to emotional issues impacting personnel on the job.

  • Credits: 4
CJU 455 Contemporary Issues in CJ CJU-455
  • Current criminal justice related events occurring nationally and locally will provide the scenarios for students to apply the knowledge acquired during this degree program in a thoughtful and scholarly manner. Students will draw upon their understanding of systems thinking, constitutional law, religion, modern trends, ethics, and individual and community behavior.

  • Credits: 4
CJU 502 Correctional Design CJU-502
  • The philosophies, roles, and designs of juvenile corrections continue to evolve. This course expands upon the basics of institutional and community corrections by exploring modern research and trends in modern corrections. Students will address leadership, legal, political, and financial issues impacting the effectiveness of corrections in a society with increasing demands and expectations of the criminal justice system.

  • Credits: 4
CJU 512 Crim Justice, Politics & Media CJU-512
  • This course examines the relationships, roles, and responsibilities of criminal justice politics and the media. Included is a critical review of the tension that exists between the two, and how effective relationships can be fostered. Students will also learn to write press releases, organize and facilitate press conferences, and effectively utilize media resources.

  • Credits: 3
CJU 596 Criminal Justice Capstone CJU-596
  • The Capstone course is the concluding event of the program. This course assists students in synthesizing previous coursework and research leading to greater self-reflection, application to their career field, and an assessment of their learning throughout the duration of the program. The student will present and discuss the final M.A. Capstone E-folio.

  • Credits: 4
CJU 490 Criminal Justice Portfolio CJU-490
  • This final course is designed to help learners reflect on all they have done during this degree program. Students will synthesize all they have learned. Preparation of a professional and educational portfolio or e-folio will cap the learning experience. Students will participate in group activities to provide closure to the program.

  • Credits: 4
CJU 451 Diversity in Criminal Justice CJU-451
  • While multiculturalism is a popular term in today's society, diversity issues play a particularly important role in criminal justice. This course provides an understanding of diversity from theoretical, organizational, and personal perspectives to impact the effectiveness of those employed in criminal justice and mitigate the risk of legal liability and public perception issues that negatively impact this profession.

  • Credits: 4
CJU 422 Information Literacy in CJ CJU-422
  • Information today grows exponentially. This course teaches students to identify information needs in their profession, know and access criminal justice data bases, discern legitimate information, manage the data, and present information in an articulate, professional manner. Students will effectively integrate sources in academic writings using APA style.

  • Credits: 4
CJU 431 Inside the Criminal Mind CJU-431
  • This course explores theories and research of criminal behavior. Students will examine how past and present understanding of criminals has determined responses of society and the criminal justice system.

  • Credits: 4
CJU 545 Legal and Legislative Issues CJU-545
  • Those in leadership positions find themselves with a greater duty to recognize and respond to legal issues. This course examines how law defines policy in areas impacting the business of criminal justice, including due process, civil rights, equal protection, employment law, civil liability, and criminal procedure. In addition to identifying emerging law, this class addresses the political science of public policy at jurisdictional levels, including the United States Supreme Court.

  • Credits: 4
CJU 435 Philosophy of Values & Ethics CJU-435
  • Students examine the issues of accountability in government and business regarding human rights and ethics through readings, discussion and debates. Exploring both ethical theory and personal values, students develop a system for making ethical decisions in their personal and professional lives. This course also explores the emotional and physical risks associated with their work and helps develop strategies that will nurture maintaining physical and emotional health.

  • Credits: 4
CJU 505 Reflective Adult Learner & Ldr CJU-505
  • The premise of this course is leaders must have an understanding of who they are and why they are here. Students will devote considerable time to self-examination and reflection to gain greater awareness and understanding of who they are, and how their life and professional experiences influence their paradigms and leadership qualities. There is an emphasis on attitude and emotional intelligence and how they influence leadership effectiveness and results.

  • Credits: 4
CJU 520 Research Methods in CJ CJU-520
  • This course will provide an understanding of the dynamics of problem-solving with special attention to research methodologies which result in finding creative and productive solutions.

  • Credits: 4
CJU 402 Returning Student Sem for CJ CJU-402
  • This course will provide each student with an opportunity to reflect on their decision to return to college. Emphasis will be on preparations for their return to college and their development of a learning plan. Students will focus on time management, organizational skills, and practical writing for criminal justice practitioners. Extensive time will be devoted to writing fundamentals, such as mechanics, sentence structure, academic and professional prose and APA style.

  • Credits: 4
CJU 437 Systems Thinking in Crim Just CJU-437
  • Given the dynamic complexity of organizations, it is vital that professionals have an understanding of how organizations and systems interact. This course provides the skills to diagnose interactions and engage in finding solutions to problems. Systems thinking serves as one of the threads of continuity running throughout this degree program.

  • Credits: 4
CJU 453 Troubled Youth in CJ System CJU-453
  • This course explores why and how governments have always treated children differently than adults. Theories of delinquency and the corresponding responses by society through the criminal justice system are addressed, as are current data, trends and programs. Students will also explore the challenges facing juvenile corrections in a society that continues to change in demographics, norms, and expectations of criminal justice.

  • Credits: 4
CLI 101 Coll Rdg & Writ Eng Lang Lrnrs CLI-101
  • This course will concentrate on providing advanced reading and writing skills needed to function successfully in U.S. university courses. This course is part of the Concordia University English Language Institute.

  • Credits: 4
CLI 103 Coll Spk & Listn Eng Lang Lrns CLI-103
  • This course will focus on the development of advanced communication through speaking and listening. This course is part of the Concordia University English Language Institute.

  • Credits: 4
CLI 102 Fndmntls of Oral Communication CLI-102
  • This course will focus on the development of introductory communication through speaking and listening. This course is part of the Concordia University English Language Institute.

  • Credits: 4
CLI 100 Fundmntls of Reading & Writing CLI-100
  • This course will concentrate on providing foundational reading and writing skills needed to function successfully in U.S. university courses. This course is part of the Concordia University English Language Institute.

  • Credits: 4
CLQ 578 Colloquy Internship I – Part 1 CLQ-578
  • The Colloquy DCE Internship provides the colloquy DCE student a supervised experience at a local ministry site. The colloquy student receives consultation and assessment for self-directed growth.

  • Credits: 1
CLQ 588 Colloquy Internship I – Part 2 CLQ-588
  • The Colloquy DCE Internship provides the colloquy DCE student a supervised experience at a local ministry site. The colloquy student receives consultation and assessment for self-directed growth.

  • Credits: 1
CLQ 598 Colloquy Internship I – Part 3 CLQ-598
  • The Colloquy DCE Internship provides the colloquy DCE student a supervised experience at a local ministry site. The colloquy student receives consultation and assessment for self-directed growth.

  • Credits: 1
CLQ 478 Colloquy Internship I CLQ-478
  • The Colloquy DCE Internship provides the colloquy DCE student a supervised experience at a local ministry site. The colloquy student receives consultation and assessment for self-directed growth. Students may enroll in this class up to three times to help fulfill internship requirements.

  • Credits: 3
CLQ 479 Colloquy Internship II CLQ-479
  • The course is a continuation of CLQ578 Colloquy Internship I. The DCE colloquy student receives continued consultation and assessment for self-directed growth. Students may enroll in this class up to three times to help fulfill internship requirements.

  • Credits: 3
CLQ 579 Colloquy Internship II-Part 1 CLQ-579
  • The course is a continuation of Colloquy Internship I. The DCE colloquy student receives continued consultation and assessment for self-directed growth.

  • Credits: 1
CLQ 589 Colloquy Internship II-Part 2 CLQ-589
  • The course is a continuation of Colloquy Internship I. The DCE colloquy student receives continued consultation and assessment for self-directed growth.

  • Credits: 1
CLQ 599 Colloquy Internship II-Part 3 CLQ-599
  • The course is a continuation of Colloquy Internship I. The DCE colloquy student receives continued consultation and assessment for self-directed growth.

  • Credits: 1
CLQ 520 Colloquy: Leadership CLQ-520
  • This course presents a systematic study of the principles of administration for effective servant leadership. The foundations, roles, and functions of effective Christian team leadership will be discussed and practiced. Leadership styles and skills will be discovered and practices.

  • Credits: 3
CLQ 572 Colloquy:Family & Youth Mnstry CLQ-572
  • This course provides students with the necessary insights and skills to develop and facilitate a ministry with and for youth and families in a congregation. A relational approach to youth and family ministry emphasizes the need for peer and family support. Philosophical and practical aspects are emphasized to help students understand youth and family ministry as an integral part of the congregation's mission. A discussion of related subjects, resources and literature is included.

  • Credits: 3
CLQ 512 Colloquy:Gifts Based Volunteer CLQ-512
  • Students will explore the theology of volunteer ministry; understand the connection of vocation and gifts-based volunteer ministry; explore best practices in volunteer management, including gift assessment, database creation and maintenance, job descriptions, recruitment, screening, training, supervision, evaluation, affirmation, and thanking volunteers; and apply learning to the design of a volunteer ministry program for a specific ministry site.

  • Credits: 3
CLQ 576 Colloquy:Intro DCE Ministry CLQ-576
  • Through class discussion, readings, presentations, and involvement with Directors of Christian Education, students grow in understanding the purpose and functions of a Director of Christian Education.

  • Credits: 3
CLQ 513 Colloquy:Ministry Teams/Parish CLQ-513
  • This course explores a team approach to ministry with particular emphasis on collaborative leadership models that utilize an individuals gifts and have a strong link to the mission of the organization. Small group dynamics, life cycles of a group, roles, covenanting and personality styles will be explored in looking at how ministry teams are used in the Parish.

  • Credits: 3
CLQ 573 Colloquy:Role of the DCE CLQ-573
  • The role of the Director of Christian Education as an educational minister is explored and considered. Calling and placement procedures, professional ethics and expectations, the constitution and by-laws of The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod, the role of the DCE in Synod and District, and the role of the DCE in team ministry are examined.

  • Credits: 3
CLQ 515 Colloquy:Tchng. Faith Across CLQ-515
  • This course will provide a study of Catechesis throughout the ages with particular attention to principles of Biblical interpretation from a Lutheran perspective. The participant will work toward a definition of Lutheran Catechesis that will incorporate an understanding of educational theory and practice, utilize tools and skills needed for appropriate Biblical study and teaching within a Lutheran framework while displaying an understanding of the relationship between Christian education and the worship and devotional life of the Church.

  • Credits: 3
CLQ 519 Colloquy:Tchng. Strat. Adults CLQ-519
  • Issues of motivating the adult learner, techniques for effective teaching, and educational implications of a variety of teaching methodologies are discussed. A review of available resources is included.

  • Credits: 3
CLQ 476 DCO Colloquy Internship I CLQ-476
  • DCO Colloquy Internship Applied Experience

  • Credits: 3
CLQ 477 DCO Colloquy Internship II CLQ-477
  • DCO Colloquy Internship Applied Experience.

  • Credits: 3
CLQ 200 Intro to Commissioned Ministry CLQ-200
  • Through class discussion, readings, presentations and involvement with field-based commissioned ministry, students will explore and consider the function of a Commissioned Minister in multiple settings. The program portfolio is developed and made ready for program exit interviews. Emphasis is placed on the development of a philosophy of ministry, personal mission statement, and professional ethics review.

  • Credits: 1
CLQ 330 Theory & Prac. in Christen Ed CLQ-330
  • Students explore and analyze faith development theory, cultural and generational influences, curricular evaluation models, and strategies for the application of Law and Gospel within Christian education. Students apply this theory on effective methods of teaching the Christian faith from the Lutheran perspective at the elementary and secondary levels.

  • Credits: 3
COM 223 Broadcast Production COM-223
  • Students are familiarized with equipment within the television studio and field production truck. Through hands-on training and simulations students gain a full understanding of how the various components of the control room work together to produce studio and remote productions. Students will crew studio shows and several athletic webcasts as part of the hands-on training. Athletic webcasts require some evening and weekend commitments. Each student will draft a plan for a studio or remote show and produce a 25 minute stand-alone production.

  • Credits: 3
COM 695 Capstone COM-695
  • The final course provides an opportunity for students to review and reflect upon the courses and experiences in the program. Additional activities add self-confidence in strategic communication management and leadership skills. Students present the completed Action Research Project they have worked on with the project coordinator, and polish their ARP report in an error-free and thorough submission. Students also continue reading and reflection on their course work and experiences as life skill builders. Students receive feedback from their Action Research Project coordinator and share learning with other students in the final presentation.

  • Credits: 3
COM 550 Comm Strat for Conflict Mgmt COM-550
  • This course provides an overview of the nature and functions of perspectives, viewpoints, and values on conflict, as well as the difficult elements and role of communication in human conflict. Students develop communication skills, such as listening and collaboration, which are necessary for managing conflict productively in interpersonal, organizational, and intercultural contexts. Professionals will gain an understanding of patterns, research strategies, and processes associated with conflict management styles with civility. This course addresses how language, perception, gender communication, generational differences, and context influence the conflict process.

  • Credits: 3
COM 104 Communicating Org Change COM-104
  • Why is it that 50% of organizational changes fail? Learn how to properly communicate the reasons for upcoming change; how to empower your employees to problem solve with you for maximum buy-in; learn how to recognize employee resistance to change and how to defuse it; and how to create an organizational culture where employees feel ownership.

  • Credits: 2
COM 445 Communication Ethics COM-445
  • This course will engage students in dialogue regarding communication ethics and inherent ethical dilemmas. Students will gain awareness about their own ethical philosophy and their ethical decision making processes. A connection will be made between communication theory, communication philosophies, current events, and personal experiences. It should prove to be an interesting, thought-provoking course. (Prerequisite: COM 103 or COM 212)

  • Credits: 2
COM 488 Communication Independt Study COM-488
  • Independent study offers the opportunity to pursue advanced study in communication. Independent study is open only to students with substantial preparatory course work in communication. It is not intended to be taken in the place of a regularly offered course. (Prerequisite: permission of communication faculty)

  • Credits: 1
COM 540 Communication Inquiry & Meas COM-540
  • This course introduces communication research strategies like a communications audit and the role of marketing research, but especially focuses on the Action Research Project (ARP) that each student will complete through the remainder of the program. Students will identify an organizational challenge (problem) that provides a learning content for applying research and change management techniques in two contextual change management cycles. The first three of the five chapters of the ARP are completed in draft form during the course (the remainder of the project is completed independently and presented in COM695). The course teacher continues to coach the studentÕs independent work after the course is completed and is part of the final project presentation. The ARP becomes a lifelong tool for process improvement for a strategic communication manager.

  • Credits: 3
COM 498 Communication Internship COM-498
  • Students participate in a variety of internship programs in such experiences as editing, publishing, broadcasting, television, human resources, and public relations under the supervision of Communication faculty. Internships are tailored to the needs, interests, and career aspirations of the student. Portfolios, learning logs, and meetings with the internship faculty supervisor are required for all internships. (Prerequisites: COM103, COM205, COM212, COM222, COM325, ENG120 and permission of communication faculty advisor)

  • Credits: 1
COM 441 Communication Research Methods COM-441
  • Basic quantitative and qualitative approaches and methods are applied to communication studies. The course includes question construction, survey research and design, experimental design, quantitative content analysis and comparisons, and qualitative analysis of participant observation, interviewing and focus group methodology. Critical studies and approaches in the field of communication will be discussed. This course is a prerequisite for COM442 because it implements the research proposal. (Prerequisites: COM103, COM212, COM205, and COM222)

  • Credits: 4
COM 444 Communication Research Methods COM-444
  • Basic quantitative approaches and methods are applied to communication studies. The course includes research question construction, survey research, SPSS, and quantitative comparisons.

  • Credits: 3
COM 442 Communication Theory COM-442
  • Students study and apply theories to human communication including interpersonal and public communication, small groups, mediated communication, persuasion, gender studies, as well as work, friend, and marital relationships. Perspectives on and methods of critical inquiry and research are an integral part of the course content. Research projects are presented to the rest of the class as well as submitted to professional organizations for review. COM442 implements the research proposal developed in COM441. COM442 and COM443 are intended to be a year-long capstone sequence. (Prerequisites: COM103, COM205, COM212, COM222, COM309 and a minimum grade of C- in COM441)

  • Credits: 4
COM 404 Conflict Management COM-404
  • This course offers a broad overview of the study of conflict from a communication perspective. It introduces students to current theoretical and applied issues in the study of conflict management using social science theories to help explain the process of interacting with others. Specifically, the course examines the nature, causes, and techniques for managing conflict across a wide variety of situations including societal clashes, psychological turmoil, group decision-making, intimate relationships, and organizational interaction. While each of these situations differs in important ways, there are commonalities in how conflict functions across them. We will look at those commonalities to understand the role of communication in conflict. The assignments and class activities focus upon the theories, models, principles, and concepts of conflict and their application to a variety of relationships. (Pre-requisite of COM103 or COM212).

  • Credits: 3
COM 610 Corp Resp & Ethical Comm COM-610
  • This course explores foundations in personal values and mission statements, decision trees in ethical decision-making, and ethical theories and moral philosophies that relate ethics to organizational, mediated, mass media, and interpersonal communication contexts. The course examines the communication components and hindrances to good ethical decision-making. Students learn how to think critically, gain sensitivity in using appropriate language, express clear ethical reasoning in both written and verbal communication, and research the role of communication in the creation of an ethical corporate culture. Through case studies, readings, and other activities, students are exposed to ethical issues that arise in communication and are required to argue and analyze the ethical dilemmas they will encounter in the working world. Learners will gain skills in assessing ethical risk to organizations in the public sphere and develop insights into their personal philosophies.

  • Credits: 3
COM 590 Crisis Communication Mgmt COM-590
  • This course addresses the basic types and elements of crises, and the importance of providing effective leadership and management in those times. Effective strategies include procedures for developing a crisis communication plan and identifying ways of reacting to crises when crises occur. Students develop tools for dealing with the media in less-than-optimal situations, learn how to develop plans for different critical audiences (both internal and external), and discover ways to utilize effective strategies for communicating the organizational message during a crisis.

  • Credits: 3
COM 470 eHealth Communication COM-470
  • This course provides an overview of the field of Health Communication through the development of an online healthy lifestyles intervention for college students. Students will create portfolio-quality materials while also exploring the relationship between online social communities and health behavior, communication between patients and caregivers, social and cultural health issues, the media's influence on health, and explore career opportunities in health communication.

  • Credits: 3
COM 210 Exploring Communication Styles COM-210
  • This course explores communication style differences and examines models of understanding and strategies for dealing with those differences in greater depth. Cultural communication styles such as direct/indirect, elaborate/succinct, high context/low context, speaker-centered vs. listener-centered, and personal/contextual will be explained, analyzed, applied, and evaluated.

  • Credits: 2
COM 403 Family Communication COM-403
  • Students examine communication patterns in functional families and interpersonal relationships. Reading and discussion are combined with experiential activities. Course units include diverse family systems, health communication, communicating with aging family members and those with disabilities, communication patterns, family roles, power, decision-making, conflict, stress and coping, ecology, and improving family communication. (Prerequisites: (COM103 or COM212) and COM205)

  • Credits: 4
COM 322 History of Film & Television COM-322
  • Students study film and television as it has developed throughout the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. Screenings of classic films and television are complimented by class analysis and discussion of how the moving image has changed over time. This is not a production course, as students will focus instead on understanding film theory and aesthetics.

  • Credits: 3
COM 580 Innovative Communication COM-580
  • Innovation is essential in organizations in the new millennium. Innovation can be learned, organized, and executed by professionals in organizations. This course researches the fundamentals of innovation, and looks at how innovation can create the future in organizations. Innovation and futurism are addressed from a strategic communication management context.

  • Credits: 3
COM 530 Interactive Media Mgmt COM-530
  • This course explores how emerging interactive communication technologies affect interpersonal and organizational communication. Students are introduced to different types of interactive media, while also researching and discussing issues related to cyberspace, virtual communities, collaborative teams, business on global networks, search engine optimization, search engine marketing, digital brand integration, Web analytics, blogs and podcasts, and wireless marketing.

  • Credits: 3
COM 545 Interactive Project Management COM-545
  • This course increases student effectiveness in a variety of strategic communication management roles and functions by exploring resources and tools (software) that help manage major projects, analytic evaluations, information from a cross-platform interactive social media projects, or site-appropriate tools for monitoring metrics that project tracking systems for use in social media organizational applications.

  • Credits: 3
COM 101 Intercult Comm Exper Wkshp COM-101
  • The world around usÑ at work, in local schools, in the communityÑis becoming increasingly diverse. This course focuses on increasing understanding of cultural similarities and differences.

  • Credits: 2
COM 409 Intercultural Comm Seminar COM-409
  • Students study and explore special topics in intercultural communication in this advanced seminar course. Students apply intercultural communication concepts, theories, and models to various contexts, including educational, political, social, and religious institutions. The seminar format allows students opportunities to discuss ideas in depth and to cater projects and papers to individual areas of special interest. (Prerequisite: COM309 or consent of instructor)

  • Credits: 2
COM 309 Intercultural Communication COM-309
  • Students explore the principles and processes of communication between cultures. Course topics include intercultural communication models, the impact of different cultural patterns on the communication process, the anthropological concept world view and its impact on intercultural communication, detection of communication problems in intercultural situations, gender and diversity issues in intercultural communication, and constructing valid strategies for communicating interculturally. (Prerequisite: COM103 or COM212)

  • Credits: 4
COM 560 Intercultural Communication COM-560
  • This course provides an overview of the major concepts, research, theories, and models that explore intercultural communication, with an emphasis on using these ideas in applied contexts. Important topics include: worldviews, communication styles, skills development in intercultural arenas, societal influences on stereotyping, ethnocentrism and racism, cultural value orientations, nonverbal dimensions of communication, language interaction, gender communication, intra-cultural issues, stereotypes, intercultural transitions, and adaptation.

  • Credits: 3
COM 324 Intermediate Video Post Produc COM-324
  • This course is designed to give students intermediate to advanced experience in Adobe Premiere Pro as well as basic experience in Adobe After Effects and Adobe Encore DVD. Students are responsible for shooting and editing several projects over the course of the semester.

  • Credits: 3
COM 103 Interpersonal Communication COM-103
  • Students examine their methods of interpersonal communication in various contexts including dyadic, small group, and mediated communication. Individual activities and group work include both oral and written components. Class discussions and small group activities provide opportunities to practice and refine interpersonal communication skills. Objective exams and quizzes focus on cognitive learning of the principles and concepts in the various communication contexts. (COM103 is one of the two choices for the communication general education requirement for all students. It is also a prerequisite for all communication majors.)

  • Credits: 4
COM 363 Interview for the Professional COM-363
  • Students study and practice conducting interviews in professional activities such as: diagnostic interviews (as related to sexual harassment), discipline and termination interviews, performance appraisals, and focus groups. The interviewing skills used to develop those activities include preparing and developing a guide, questioning, probing, listening, recording, and concluding the interview. (Prerequisite: COM 103 or COM 212)

  • Credits: 2
COM 109 Intro to Communication COM-109
  • This course introduces the practices and principles of interpersonal communication. This course will require students to gain introductory knowledge of theory as well as apply course concepts through written assignments in addition to individual and group presentations. Emphasis is placed on the communication process. Issues to be addressed include: interpersonal relationships, sending and receiving messages, language, listening, and cultural considerations. Additional emphasis will engage students to think critically about cultural implications regarding interpersonal communication.

  • Credits: 3
COM 224 Intro to Video Production COM-224
  • This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of video production. They will learn the basic uses of production equipment, both recording and editing, and will apply that knowledge to their own hands-on projects. Production theory will be studied both as it applies to their own projects and to classic and contemporary media examples.

  • Credits: 3
COM 221 Laptop Video Practicum COM-221
  • This course is for the student who wants to learn the most basic video production skills using their laptop webcam and free editing software. Students will produce several short group projects. Video production projects develop the skills of video recording, editing, and titling. This class meets with students enrolled in COM222.

  • Credits: 1
COM 570 Leadership Communication COM-570
  • This course emphasizes the way leadership depends on healthy communication skills that nurture a healthy organizational culture. Critical management techniques also rely on understanding those leadership skills that are essential to work with people in a dynamic interactive culture. Course elements include a focus on the research behind successful leadership and management strategies as part of human interaction, decision making, problem solving, mentoring, collaboration, team building, change management, facilitation, and core management skills.

  • Credits: 3
COM 105 Listening Communication Tool COM-105
  • An essential skill for administrators is effective listening; too often hearing is confused with listening. Students will discover their personal barriers to effective listening; learn how to mitigate listening barriers to make others feel heard, integrate new listening skills from the telephone to the boardroom, and discover how much better informed they will be about: business, employees, and customer.

  • Credits: 2
COM 222 Mass Communication COM-222
  • Students study and learn to critically appraise various media by exploring the weaknesses and strengths of each. The content of the course includes history of the traditional mass media as well as an exploration of contemporary social media, advertising, public relations, media law and regulation, media ethics, and social responsibility. Video projects develop basic skills of digital image gathering, editing, and distribution. (Prerequisite: COM103 or COM212)

  • Credits: 4
COM 520 Media Strategies COM-520
  • This course presents a structured approach to understanding and managing internal and external communications. Students explore media relations, the research and creation of strategic public relations media plans, audience analysis, media characteristics, media and marketing decisions, and how to manage various communication technology functions and budgets. Special attention is given to the role of emerging media formats.

  • Credits: 3
COM 478 Organizational Communication COM-478
  • Students examine theories of communication systems, processes and assumptions in organization structures. Topics include roles, relationships and responsibilities of individuals within organizations as well as skills in and applications of organizational communication, including communication audits. Interviewing skills in the various demands of organizations will be examined and practiced. Values and ethical communication behaviors are explored through a variety of activities including case studies and self-assessments. Exploration of crisis communication strategies and their effectiveness in organizational image restoration are examined. (Prerequisites: COM103, COM212 and COM205)

  • Credits: 4
COM 443 Persuasive Communication COM-443
  • Students study and apply persuasive communication theories to the study and analysis of communication events including speeches, posters, films, campaigns, television programs, advertising, social media and other forms of public communication. Students examine the ways in which beliefs, values, attitudes, and behavior are deliberately affected through various forms of human and electronic communication. The major project is an application of theory and research. Research projects may be submitted to professional organizations or an online journal for review. COM442 and COM443 are intended to be a year-long capstone sequence. (Prerequisites: COM103, COM205, COM212 AND COM222)

  • Credits: 4
COM 510 Persuasive Communication COM-510
  • This course covers the principles and practices of persuasion, advocacy, and marketing. Learners explore theories of motivation, attitude, and behavior that guide how an ethical communicator strives to gain compliance; properly advocate for people, values, and ideals; and change attitudes and behavior. Students learn about how research informs marketing and persuasion tactics, and apply key concepts and conceptual frameworks in marketing such as how to segment, reach target audiences, and influence others in a socially responsible way. Students work with a communications plan that addresses a real issue that draws upon the things you have learned in this course. Students also have an opportunity to develop presentation skills through in-class presentations.

  • Credits: 3
COM 209 Position Paper Writing COM-209
  • This course helps students discover that saying what they think in written form need not be the formidable task they sometimes imagine it to be. This course introduces students to a step-by-step writing process that takes a subject they already know about and turns it into a polished product that is original, informative, substantive, and provocative enough to convince readers of its value.

  • Credits: 3
COM 228 Public Speak: Overcome Fear COM-228
  • This course is intended to help students overcome a fear of public speaking. Please understand that while this course can get you started, it is not expected that upon completion of the course you will be able to present without any fear. It is expected, however, that you will have a better understanding of the problem and how to deal with it.

  • Credits: 2
COM 212 Public Speaking COM-212
  • Students prepare and deliver various types of public performances including speeches and oral interpretation. The evaluation and criticism of speeches is studied. Videotape helps students adjust to their performance style and improve presentation delivery. Course units include speech construction, presentation and delivery, audience and text analysis, informative, persuasive and special occasion speeches as well as visual aid construction. (COM212 is one of the two choices for the communication general education requirement for all students. It is also a prerequisite for all communication majors.)

  • Credits: 4
COM 108 Sales Presentation Skills COM-108
  • This course focuses on presentation skills to achieve specific objectives including Àgetting the sale,À sharing important information, gaining approval and taking Àaction.À Skills include audience analysis, presentation format, tools, and techniques. In-class feedback allows for real-time evaluation of skills.

  • Credits: 2
COM 490 Senior Seminar COM-490
  • Students finalize their capstone research project in this culminating experience in the discipline. Students will be expected to prepare their research projects for dissemination to professional organizations for review, presentation, or publication. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in COM441 and COM442, Permission of instructor, Senior Standing)

  • Credits: 2
COM 205 Small Group Communication COM-205
  • Students study and practice communication in small discussion and task groups. Topics include leadership and facilitation of groups as well as group dynamics. Group activities include problem solving discussions and task completion. Course units include goal setting, cohesion and norms, power, leadership, decision-making and problem solving, conflict and facilitating task and interpersonal relations in face-to-face and virtual groups. (Prerequisite: COM103 or COM212)

  • Credits: 4
COM 325 Social Media & Public Relation COM-325
  • Students develop an understanding of the theory and strategic management of social media especially in the public relations context. By analyzing history, tactics and current trends, students learn how the public relations process and the goal of relationship building with various stakeholders is impacted by various social media applications. Students also become acquainted with social media tactics in various professional settings. (Required prerequisite: COM103 or COM212)(Suggested prerequisite: COM222)

  • Credits: 4
COM 500 Strategic Communication Mgmt COM-500
  • This course provides an introduction to a broad range of strategic communication management topics, addressing the communication theories, dynamics, research, principles, and practices that are most prevalent in small groups, societies, and in all aspects of organizational life. The course takes time to build group relationships and creates a collaborative learning environment conducive for personal and professional growth that emphasizes problem solving and healthy decision-making throughout the program.

  • Credits: 3
COM 327 Television News Gathering COM-327
  • This course is designed to give students both theory and hands-on experience in television news gathering. Students will learn the theories and means of putting a news program together and put that experience to use by taping and airing a news program for the campus cable channel on a weekly basis.

  • Credits: 3
COM 364 The Job Interview COM-364
  • Students study and practice interviewing skills as interviewee and interviewer in the job selection process. Interviewee skills will focus on rŽsumŽ writing and building, informational interviewing, interview preparation, verbal and nonverbal responses to questions, and assessing one's fit in an organizational culture. Interviewer skills will focus on creating a job interview guide, legal and illegal questions, nonverbal variables, and professionalism. (Prerequisite: COM 103 or COM 212)

  • Credits: 2
COM 323 TV Producer Practicum COM-323
  • Students in this course are responsible for producing original programming for the campus cable channel. Responsibilities include overseeing all production aspects of a show as well as assigning roles to and managing other students during shoots. Students are encouraged to develop projects of personal interest. May be repeated for up to 6 credits.

  • Credits: 3
CSC 245 Advanced Web Development CSC-245
  • This course covers the use of advanced Web development tools, including JavaScript and core Web technologies. As a capstone for the Associate of Science in Computer Science, students will work in groups to create a Web application. (Prerequisite: CSC225 and CSC235)

  • Credits: 4
CSC 121 Basics Technology in Business CSC-121
  • The purpose of this course is to respond to the technological demands of business today. Students will be equipped with the required knowledge and skills to fulfill basic business needs. A foundation in fundamental tools and emerging technologies will be explored through both practice and theory with a focus on how they can be leveraged for business advantage. A solid base in business information systems will provide students the confidence to generate and manage information for thoughtful and informed decisions. Business efficiency and productivity topics will include emerging and contemporary technologies for data management, business intelligence, and professional communication.

  • Credits: 2
CSC 310 Computer Arch and Oper Systems CSC-310
  • This course is designed as an introduction to the functional components of computer systems, including their hardware implementation and management at different levels, and their interaction, characteristics, and performance. The course also covers practical implications for computer programming. (Prerequisite: CSC235 or admission to the B.S. program)

  • Credits: 4
CSC 450 Computer Science Capstone CSC-450
  • This course is a capstone course for the Bachelor of Science in Computer Science. Students will work with a mentor to develop an application that demonstrates mastery of program outcomes. The final project will presented to an audience. (Prerequisite: Advisor approval)

  • Credits: 4
CSC 300 Computers for Advanced Users CSC-300
  • This course explores features for word processing, spreadsheets, database management, and presentation graphics software programs that increase problem-solving skills and creativity for professional use.

  • Credits: 2
CSC 105 Computers for Beginner Users CSC-105
  • This course is for those with little or no experience with computers. It begins with an introduction to computers and their terminology, followed by a discussion on Microsoft Windows XP and the use of Microsoft Office 2002 application software. The course will wrap up with a brief discussion on using email and surfing the Internet.

  • Credits: 2
CSC 150 Computers for Intermed Users CSC-150
  • This course is designed to build upon basic computer skills. A basic introductory knowledge of computers is expected. Students enhance their use of Microsoft Office applications through various assignments and labs.

  • Credits: 2
CSC 230 Database Design CSC-230
  • Utilize a database tool to create a prototype for output that meets real-life business outcomes. Learn the fundamentals of database design including the relational model, SQL, and data warehousing. Practice working individually and in teams to learn the normalization process, minimizing opportunities for redundant, inaccurate data. Other topics include design implications for speeding data access (e.g. de-normalization), and the emergence of unstructured data systems.

  • Credits: 4
CSC 410 Development/Operations CSC-410
  • This course presents the use of established reference architectures to model scalable architectures for cloud applications. In addition, it demonstrates the use of cloud management approaches in the provision of infrastructure resources and in the deployment and management of application components. It includes discussion and application of software development processes, including Agile, continuous integration, automated testing, the use of containers, and other issues related to application deployment. (Prerequisite: CSC330)

  • Credits: 4
CSC 430 Distributed System Architectur CSC-430
  • This course covers concepts related to distributed systems and parallel computer architecture. Topics include concurrency and concurrent programming, fault tolerance, and parallel programming. (Prerequisite: CSC301)

  • Credits: 4
CSC 115 Intro to Computer Science CSC-115
  • This course is designed to provide an overview of basic principles and practices used in the field of computer science. It covers common terminology, career paths in the computer science field, and common methodologies used in software development.

  • Credits: 4
CSC 330 Language Design and Implement CSC-330
  • The course provides a comparative survey of programming language paradigms. It includes an overview of the properties, applications, syntax, and semantics of selected object-oriented, functional, comparative, and declarative programming languages. (Prerequisite: CSC310)

  • Credits: 4
CSC 175 Math for Computer Science CSC-175
  • This course covers mathematical concepts that are widely used in the field of Computer Science, including discrete math, logic, and proofs. (Prerequisite: Two years of high school algebra, minimum of C- in MAT100 Intermediate Algebra, or Level 3 on the Math Placement Exam)

  • Credits: 4
CSC 210 Microsoft Excel Core CSC-210
  • Through Microsoft Excel, students will be led through an exploration of a powerful spreadsheet program. After a review of the basic commands and functionality, students will be challenged to manipulate specific data for informative reporting that is visually, accurately and dynamically representative of the learning objective. To accomplish this task advanced formulas, search strategies, and data analysis tools will be incorporated into learning projects including mastery of Pivot Tables and Pivot Charts. Further studies will include strategies for managing large data sets, linking and importing external data, mitigating security issues, and working toward automation. Upon completion of the course, students will have sufficient preparation if they wish to take the Microsoft Excel Expert Exam for the Microsoft Office Specialist Certificate.

  • Credits: 4
CSC 135 Modern Web Design CSC-135
  • This course covers the fundamentals of Web design, using current methods of development across platforms. It includes concepts related to user interface and accessibility. (Suggested prerequisite: CSC115)

  • Credits: 4
CSC 225 Object-Oriented Programming CSC-225
  • This course provides an introduction to concepts related to object-oriented programming, including pillars of OOP, data structures, and class design. It addresses tiered architectures and the use of UML class diagrams. (Suggested prerequisite:CSC175)

  • Credits: 4
CSC 301 Programming & Problem Solving CSC-301
  • This course emphasizes structured programming and problem solving techniques as implemented in a high level language. Topics include input and output procedures, control structures and Boolean expressions, functions and procedures with parameters, recursion, looping techniques and data structures. (Prerequisite: minimum grade of C in MAT135 or MAT/CSC175)

  • Credits: 4
CSC 235 Server-Side Development CSC-235
  • This course provides an overview of concepts and skills used to maintain a server, including HTTP and database methods. It includes basic database design techniques, with an introduction to SQL and security considerations. (Prerequisite: CSC135)

  • Credits: 4
CVM 270 Introduction to the City I CVM-270
  • This class is the first part of a two semester sequence designed to give students an understanding of life in the urban setting. This course develops an understanding of the dynamics of the urban area. Opportunities are also available in this course for the Christian to explore what it means to be a child of God in the urban setting. The course is cross-cultural and cross-disciplinary.

  • Credits: 3
CVM 275 Introduction to the City II CVM-275
  • This class is the second part of a two semester sequence designed to give students an understanding of the life in the urban setting. This semester focuses upon world religions, grant writing, and challenges of the city. The course is cross-cultural and cross-disciplinary.

  • Credits: 3
CVM 220 Outreach Leadership Institute CVM-220
  • The Outreach Leadership Institute (OLI) is a course designed within the context of a 2-day training event to better equip individuals involved in or responsible for evangelism and outreach at the congregational level. OLI will help congregations re-kindle their vision for sharing the Gospel and equip them with the requisite skills and theories. It is intended to benefit teachers, administrators, Directors of Christian Education, Directors of Christian Outreach, Directors of Parish Music, lay workers, pastors, and other professional and volunteer leaders by sharpening their skills in the area of evangelism and outreach while serving in their particular areas of ministry. Participants will learn significant information, strategies, methods, and theories related to congregational and educational outreach. Besides an opening plenary session, each participant will choose two-4 _ hour modules, each module studying one outreach topic. The entire institute will be bathed in prayer and worship. This annual event strives to strengthen the Building Blocks for Today's Great Commission Congregations. (No pre-requisite).

  • Credits: 2
CVM 368 Urban Ministry Practicum CVM-368
  • Participants will experience service in an urban environment, learning about the community and becoming involved in direct service. The participant, instructor and site director will jointly design this experience.. Readings will focus upon the unique urban culture.

  • Credits: 2
CYB 504 Best Prac Vulnerability Assess CYB-504
  • Students assess system vulnerabilities, conduct controlled exploitation and produce and communicate an effective remediation plan by applying the professional Common Body of Knowledge (CBK) for both the Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) and EC-Council Certified Security Analyst (ECSA) certifications.

  • Credits: 3
CYB 505 Career Adv Private and Federal CYB-505
  • Students analyze cybersecurity career trends in order to develop their career objectives and to identify competencies, specialized areas, and knowledge skills and abilities (KSAs) required for successful attainment of their objectives. Based on this analysis, students begin developing their cybersecurity career advancement plans.

  • Credits: 3
CYB 502 Cybersecurity Practicum I CYB-502
  • Students develop the capability to support the conducting of an assessment and authorization project requiring the use of security controls. Students will then document results.

  • Credits: 3
CYB 503 Cybersecurity Practicum II CYB-503
  • Students develop the capability to provide recommendations based on the results of an assessment and authorization project which requires the use of security controls.

  • Credits: 3
CYB 501 Cybersecurity Risk Mgmt CYB-501
  • Students apply the NIST Risk Management Framework (RMF) by completing deliverables and communicating the results of a NIST RMF project. In addition, students review the Common Body of Knowledge (CBK) of the Certified Authorization Professional (CAP) certification.

  • Credits: 3
CYB 509 Cybrsec Ldrship Best Practices CYB-509
  • Students utilize the 10 domains of the Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) Common Body of Knowledge (CBK) as a framework for helping organizations integrate stronger security protocols by determining the best response to specific scenarios.

  • Credits: 3
CYB 500 Fed Policy and Risk Mgmt CYB-500
  • Students review and analyze compliance implications of selected federal cybersecurity policies with a specific focus on the NIST Risk Management Framework.

  • Credits: 3
CYB 508 Function of Incident Mgmt CYB-508
  • Students analyze the function and components of incident management in cybersecurity risk management by developing an incident management requirements plan which utilizes continuous monitoring. Plan components include rapid incident detection, containment, impact mitigation, impact, and secure restoration of operations.

  • Credits: 3
CYB 506 Insider Threat Prevention I CYB-506
  • Students assess the factors affecting the prevention and detection of insider cybersecurity personnel threats through the security investigation process.

  • Credits: 3
CYB 507 Insider Threat Prevention II CYB-507
  • Students continue to examine how the security investigation process relates to preventing and/or detecting insider cybersecurity personnel threats. Utilizing the assessment completed in 6051, students finalize and submit a security clearance application.

  • Credits: 3

D

DCO 497 Intn’l Mission DCO Internship DCO-497
  • This experience prepares the individual for an internship in the international mission field. The experience includes mission orientation, language acquisition, and basic training in English as a second language, local enculturation in the host culture.

  • Credits: 6
DI 509 App of DI in Gifted Education DI-509
  • This course is a study of the improvement of educational practices in relation to differentiated instruction with emphasis on gifted education.

  • Credits: 3
DI 532 Collab in Inclusive Settings DI-532
  • A study of applied best practices for implementing and sustaining collaborative teaching in inclusive settings. Areas of focus include skills for collaboration, co-teaching, inclusive school practices, team building, shared problem solving, interpersonal communication, conflict and controversy, and home-school communication.

  • Credits: 3
DI 538 DI Across Content DI-538
  • This course will focus on methods of instruction for diverse learners. Students will develop knowledge and skills for planning, implementing, coordinating and evaluating differentiated teaching and learning environments that challenge and assist diverse learners to achieve at their highest level of ability.

  • Credits: 3
DI 594 Effective Practices in DI DI-594
  • An introduction to the study, exploration and application of effective practices for all classroom learners. Focus is on classroom instruction blending of whole-class, group and individual instruction on the premise that instructional approaches are to be varied and adapted in relation to the diverse student needs in the classroom.

  • Credits: 3
DI 515 Family Systems for Educators DI-515
  • Best practices for building strong family-school relationships; a survey of current developments in the study of the family and an analysis of changes in American society and their influence on family life.

  • Credits: 3
DI 536 Inclusion: Effective Practices DI-536
  • Exploring and applying the values underlying inclusion, the foundations of successful inclusion, differentiating instruction and classroom management.

  • Credits: 3
DI 534 Tchg Stdts w/Mental Hlth Needs DI-534
  • A study of classroom strategies, state and district initiatives and support resources that help children and youth with mental health needs learn successfully in the inclusive classroom setting.

  • Credits: 3
DPT 7291 Administration Roles DPT-7291
  • The roles of the physical therapist in administration and management are explored. Health care economics, budgeting, supervision, planning, marketing, and public relations are specifically addressed.

  • Credits: 3
DPT 7101 Anatomy DPT-7101
  • This course is a comprehensive study of human anatomy, which includes dissection of a human cadaver. Skeletal, muscular, nervous, digestive, cardiovascular, respiratory, and urogenital systems will be covered, and emphasis will be placed on the relatedness of structure and function. (Prerequisite: Acceptance into the DPT program)

  • Credits: 6
DPT 7103 Applied Neuroscience DPT-7103
  • This course provides an in-depth exploration of human movement, learning, communication, memory, and emotions. Topics include the components and neuroplasticity of the central and peripheral nervous systems. In addition, clinical aspects of neurological conditions most applicable to the physical therapist are presented. Class activities include lecture, laboratory and working through case scenarios. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of the first semester of the DPT curriculum)

  • Credits: 3
DPT 7208 Biopsychosocial Aspects DPT-7208
  • The tools and strategies for dealing with the biopsychosocial aspects of patient care are introduced. Biomedical and biopsychosocial models will be investigated and contrasted. Stress management including religious practices for patients and health care providers will be addressed. Class activities include lecture, laboratory sessions, implementation of basic psychological screens, and role-playing scenarios.

  • Credits: 2
DPT 7209 Cadiopulmn/Acute Care/Trauma DPT-7209
  • Physical therapy examination and interventions for cardiovascular and pulmonary conditions across the lifespan and continuum of care including acute care and trauma are addressed. Class activities include lecture, lab, and case studies.

  • Credits: 3
DPT 7262 Capstone I DPT-7262
  • Introduction to the capstone project. Each student will complete one of two tracks: inquiry or professional development. Both require six credits of student work. Inquiry Track - Students work with a faculty member in small groups to further their knowledge of scholarly methods. Together, they will design a research project that is faculty generated or approved and student implemented. Teaching methods include discussion, small group activities, and use of computer data analysis tools. Professional Development Track - Students enroll in an interdisciplinary course, complete an independent study, or a course offered by another department to explore a specific area of practice and to enhance understanding of the interdisciplinary team approach. Professional Development projects must be approved by the faculty. Independent studies require the agreement of a faculty member to act as the studentÕs mentor.

  • Credits: 2
DPT 7263 Capstone II DPT-7263
  • Continuation of the inquiry or professional development project.

  • Credits: 1
DPT 7264 Capstone III DPT-7264
  • Continuation of the inquiry or professional development project.

  • Credits: 1
DPT 7365 Capstone IV DPT-7365
  • Students complete their doctoral projects. Activities include an oral defense presented to faculty, peers, the next PT Program cohorts, and the community. The capstone project culminates with faculty approval of the final written project.

  • Credits: 2
DPT 7501 Clinical Internship I DPT-7501
  • Students participate in an eight-week clinical rotation that focuses on continued development of basic patient management skills from examination through intervention.

  • Credits: 4
DPT 7502 Clinical Internship II DPT-7502
  • Students participate in an eight-week clinical rotation that focuses on development of patient management skills from examination through intervention.

  • Credits: 4
DPT 7503 Clinical Internship III DPT-7503
  • Students participate in an eight-week clinical rotation that focuses on development of patient management skills from examination through intervention.

  • Credits: 4
DPT 7504 Clinical Internship IV DPT-7504
  • Students participate in a 12 week internship that focuses on development of entry-level patient management skills from examination through intervention, as well as development of other skills related to practice such as consultation and administration. This is the culminating full-time clinical rotation after which students are expected to possess the skills and behaviors required to enter practice as a physical therapist.

  • Credits: 6
DPT 7111 Clinical Seminar I DPT-7111
  • This is the first course of a three course sequence. The roles of the profession of physical therapy within the healthcare system, the healthcare team, and the Christian tradition are explored. Students begin to develop the professional behaviors and communication skills required to thrive in those roles. Emphasis is on the application of this material to real-world situations through multiple clinic visits that occur throughout the semester. Class activities include lecture, group activities, and clinic visits. (Prerequisite: Acceptance into the DPT program)

  • Credits: 2
DPT 7112 Clinical Seminar II DPT-7112
  • This is the second course of a three course sequence. Issues related to morals and values, cultural and socioeconomic diversity, and psychosocial aspects of disability are explored within the context of multiple clinical visits. Legal and ethical issues in physical therapy practice are introduced. Class activities include lecture, group activities, and clinic visits. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of the first semester of the DPT curriculum)

  • Credits: 2
DPT 7213 Clinical Seminar III DPT-7213
  • Opportunities for students to discuss issues in the context of their previous and future clinical experiences. Topics include legal and ethical issues, delegation and supervision, the healthcare environment and reimbursement, the effects of religious practices, and other practice concerns.

  • Credits: 2
DPT 7121 Clinical Skills 1/Foundations DPT-7121
  • This is the first course of a three course sequence. The fundamental processes involved in physical therapy patient/client examination, evaluation, and intervention are introduced. Bed mobility, transfers, and wheelchair/assistive device management are included. A basic examination framework that can be utilized across diagnoses and throughout the lifespan is developed. Students begin to use medical terminology to document findings, using a variety of structured formats. Class activities include lecture, lab, interaction with community volunteer patients, and case studies. (Prerequisite: Acceptance into the DPT program)

  • Credits: 4
DPT 7131 Clinical Skills Assessment I DPT-7131
  • This is the first course of a two course sequence. Throughout the semester, students will work with CSP DPT faculty members on developing and implementing evaluation and intervention techniques for commonly seen physical therapy patient presentations. The course culminates with a comprehensive assessment of clinical skills and professional behaviors developed in the first year of the curriculum. This takes place within the context of a benchmark examination and Objective Structured Clinical Examination. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of the first two semesters of the DPT curriculum)

  • Credits: 1
DPT 7232 Clinical Skills Assessment II DPT-7232
  • A comprehensive assessment of clinical skills and professional behaviors developed in the first two years of the curriculum. This assessment takes place within the context of a clinical environment.

  • Credits: 1
DPT 7122 Clinical Skills II/MT & Exerc DPT-7122
  • This is the second course of a three course sequence. Beginning skills in physical therapy interventions for a variety of impairments and functional limitations across diagnoses and the lifespan are developed. Principles of exercise prescription and progression are presented for a variety of impairments and functional limitations. Beginning manual therapy skills are introduced. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of the first semester of the DPT curriculum)

  • Credits: 4
DPT 7123 Clinical Skills III/Modalities DPT-7123
  • This is the third course of a three course sequence. Physical therapy interventions specific to therapeutic modalities and electrotherapy are developed, with emphasis on integrating these interventions into a comprehensive plan of care for patients across diagnoses and across the lifespan. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of the first two semester of the DPT curriculum)

  • Credits: 4
DPT 7301 Complex Medical DPT-7301
  • Physical therapy examination and intervention for critically ill patients, those with multi-organ involvement, and those with complicating psychosocial and environmental issues are addressed. Class activities include case studies and discussion.

  • Credits: 2
DPT 7392 Ethics and Professional Issues DPT-7392
  • Ethics and professional issues for physical therapy professionals are explored. Students will critically analyze ethical concepts and major issues facing the profession of physical therapy. These will be presented in discussion and debate format. Students develop a plan for professional development and lifelong learning.

  • Credits: 1
DPT 7104 Functl. Anatomy/Biomechanics DPT-7104
  • Regional functional and articular anatomy is explored and applied in a rehabilitation context. Principles of and instrumentation for motion analysis are utilized to develop a thorough understanding of human movement. Class activities include lecture, observation, and laboratory activities. Two movement analysis projects provide the student experience in analysis and interpretation of functional movement patterns. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of the first semester of the DPT curriculum)

  • Credits: 3
DPT 7141 Health Promotion I DPT-7141
  • This is the first course of a two course sequence. Health is broadly defined. This course will examine the determinants of health status, and will also explore the roles of physical therapy in promoting health, how health promotion fits within APTAÕs vision for the physical therapy profession, reducing health disparities, and improving quality of life across the lifespan. Students will conduct a community-based needs assessment to identify a health problem and its contributing factors, and later design a collaborative, ethical, and culturally responsive solution to the identified need within their selected community. Students will further investigate the physical therapistÕs ability to screen and intervene with exercise, stress reduction, and nutrition counseling within the context of community-based health promotion programs. Throughout the course, an emphasis will be placed upon evidence-based practice, learning styles, health theories, cultural competence, and tailored health education in order to provide effective patient education. Class activities include lecture, lab, and development of a community-based health promotion project. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of the first two semesters of the DPT curriculum)

  • Credits: 2
DPT 7242 Health Promotion II DPT-7242
  • This is the second course of a two course sequence. Health is broadly defined. This course will examine the determinants of health status, and will also explore the roles of physical therapy in promoting health, how health promotion fits within APTAÕs vision for the physical therapy profession, reducing health disparities, and improving quality of life across the lifespan. Students will conduct a community-based needs assessment to identify a health problem and its contributing factors, and later design a collaborative, ethical, and culturally responsive solution to the identified need within their selected community. Students will further investigate the physical therapistÕs ability to screen and intervene with exercise, stress reduction, and nutrition counseling within the context of community-based health promotion programs. Throughout the course, an emphasis will be placed upon evidence-based practice, learning styles, health theories, cultural competence, and tailored health education in order to provide effective patient education. Class activities include lecture, lab, and implementation and evaluation of a community-based.

  • Credits: 2
DPT 7207 Integumentary/Medical DPT-7207
  • Physical therapy examination and interventions for integumentary and medical conditions across the lifespan and continuum of care are addressed. Issues associated with the lymphatic system are included. Class activities include lecture, lab and case studies.

  • Credits: 3
DPT 7151 Lifespan I DPT-7151
  • This is the first course in a two course sequence. Theories of motor development across the lifespan are presented within the context of physical therapy practice. Normal age related change across childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and later adulthood are explored. Health and motor planning across the lifespan, pediatric development, and normal physiological factors specific to the geriatric population will be reviewed. This will include changes in the cognitive, musculoskeletal and sensory systems. Changes in physical function are presented, compared, and contrasted between pediatric and geriatric patients through lecture, small group projects, and large group discussion. Students will develop pediatric and geriatric patient screening examinations. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of the first two semesters of the DPT curriculum)

  • Credits: 2
DPT 7252 Lifespan II DPT-7252
  • This is the second course of a two course sequence. Students build on their experiences with pediatric and geriatric patients through exploration of models of delivery, reimbursement, motivation, education, intervention strategies, and caregiver issues across the lifespan. Class activities include lecture, lab, literature review, caregiver panels, and patient interaction.

  • Credits: 2
DPT 7106 Medical Screening DPT-7106
  • This course is an introduction of medical screening of patients for conditions that may require examination by a physician or a physician-extender across the lifespan. The lecture and laboratory experiences will enhance professional communication between physical therapists, patients, and physicians facilitating patient referral outside physical therapy.

  • Credits: 2
DPT 7271 Musculoskeletal I DPT-7271
  • The role of the physical therapist in examining musculoskeletal conditions across the lifespan and continuum of care is introduced. Examination processes are regionally applied and students gain initial exposure to differential diagnosis and interventions. Class activities include lecture, lab, and case studies.

  • Credits: 3
DPT 7272 Musculoskeletal II DPT-7272
  • Students further develop concepts of differential diagnosis, prognosis, and interventions for patients with musculoskeletal conditions across the lifespan and continuum of care. Class activities include lecture, lab, and case studies.

  • Credits: 3
DPT 7373 Musculoskeletal III DPT-7373
  • Students are exposed to musculoskeletal topics in greater depth to facilitate a global understanding of the role of the musculoskeletal physical therapist across the lifespan and continuum of care. Class activities include lecture, lab, and complex case studies.

  • Credits: 2
DPT 7281 Neuromuscular I DPT-7281
  • The framework for examination and intervention is applied and expanded to patients with neuromuscular diagnoses across the lifespan and continuum of care. The course focuses on functional areas of importance including mobility, transfers, wheelchair skills, balance, gait and upper extremity function. Class activities include lecture, lab and case studies.

  • Credits: 3
DPT 7282 Neuromuscular II DPT-7282
  • Students build on their examination and intervention framework and neuroscience foundation to approach patients within the neuromuscular practice patterns across the lifespan and continuum of care. Specific examination and intervention techniques, special topics and prognosticating related to the practice patterns are covered. Class activities include lecture, lab and case studies.

  • Credits: 3
DPT 7383 Neuromuscular III DPT-7383
  • Advanced topics related to the examination and intervention of patients with neuromuscular dysfunction across the lifespan and continuum of care are presented. Emphasis is placed on intervention techniques, communication/coordination of care and management of complex patients. Class activities include lecture, lab and case studies.

  • Credits: 2
DPT 7161 Research Methods/EBP DPT-7161
  • Introduction to evidence based practice and clinical research. The skills learned will enable students to develop an initial, general research question, locate the evidence, review the scientific literature, and conduct critical appraisals of scientific articles. Course assignments require student application of the information. Class activities include lecture, discussion, and small group activities.

  • Credits: 3
DPT 7100 Service Learning I DPT-7100
  • This is the first course of a two course service learning sequence. Service is an important component of the Lutheran tradition and is a key element of the Concordia, St. Paul mission statement. Service-learning incorporates cultural competence, meaningful service, and critical reflective thinking to enhance student learning. The students will participate in lecture, case studies, and interaction with the community to reinforce the importance of life-long civic engagement, patient and/or community advocacy, and social responsibility. Students apply what they learn in the classroom to the community. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of the first two semesters of the DPT curriculum)

  • Credits: 1
DPT 7200 Service Learning II DPT-7200
  • This is the second course of a two course sequence. Students develop, implement and evaluate individualized or small group service learning projects. Projects may take on a variety of formats, but must have a common goal of promoting health for a group who otherwise would not have access to that service. Students contract with service learning coordinators for specific requirements. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of the first two years of the DPT curriculum)

  • Credits: 1
DPT 7374 Specialty Seminar DPT-7374
  • Groups of students work with individual faculty members to investigate specialized aspects of physical therapy practice.

  • Credits: 2
DPT 7102 Systems Physiol & Pathophys I DPT-7102
  • This first course of a two-course sequence begins with a cell structure and function overview. The physiology and pathophysiology of the endocrine, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and nervous systems are presented. Fundamentals of pathology for each system are presented from various perspectives: etiology; pathogenesis; signs and symptoms; medical diagnosis, including laboratory tests and diagnostic imaging; and treatment including pharmacological intervention. Emphasis is placed on identifying Òred flagsÓ that would indicate to a physical therapist that treatment may be contraindicated or referral to another health care provider is appropriate. Class activities include lecture, discussion and problem solving scenarios. (Prerequisite: Acceptance into the DPT program)

  • Credits: 3
DPT 7105 Systems Physiol & Pathophys II DPT-7105
  • This is the second course of a two-course sequence. The physiology and pathophysiology of the integumentary, immune, rheumatic, pulmonary, hematologic, genitourinary, hepatic, pancreatic and biliary and gastrointestinal systems are presented. An overview of infectious diseases and oncology is provided. Fundamentals of pathology for each system are presented from various perspectives: etiology; pathogenesis; signs and symptoms; medical diagnosis, including laboratory tests and diagnostic imaging; and treatment including pharmacological intervention. Emphasis is placed on identifying Òred flagsÓ that would indicate to a physical therapist that treatment may be contraindicated or referral to another health care provider is appropriate. Class activities include lecture, discussion and problem solving scenarios. (Prerequisites: Successful completion of the first semester of the DPT program)

  • Credits: 3
DPT 7210 Women’s Health DPT-7210
  • Basic and clinical science elements of evaluation and intervention of womenÕs health conditions are introduced. Students will be introduced to treatment of pregnancy related musculoskeletal conditions, continence assessment and pelvic floor muscle training, and assessment of risk factors for osteoporosis. Topics covered include anatomy, endocrinology, and physiology, breast health, disease processes with gender differences, incontinence, obstetrics, and osteoporosis (excerpted from IOPTWH).

  • Credits: 2

E

ECC 251 Children’s Mental Health ECC-251
  • This course provides early childhood educators with the theoretical foundation for emotional development of young children. Using the concepts and strategies discussed in the course, educators can develop best practices for enhancing children's mental health through the physical and emotional environments.

  • Credits: 3
ECC 180 MN EC Educators Conf ECC-180
  • Join the faculty of Concordia University and the Minnesota South District for this annual conference. Choose from over 60 sectionals with tracts geared for infants, toddlers, preschool, kindergarten, primary, school age, administrator as well as general topics to update your knowledge, exchange ideas, and reaffirm your commitment to the education of young children. For more information and conference register see the website: www.csp.edu/earlychildhood or call 651-641-8857.

  • Credits: 1
ECC 204 Transform Challenging Behavior ECC-204
  • Quirky Kids: Why some kids have trouble fitting in. This course is an overview of the challenging behaviors that make some kids seem 'quirky.' Many of these behaviors are part of specific disorders like Autism Spectrum Disorder, Sensory Processing Disorder, ADHD, and Nonverbal Learning Disorder. We will examine each of these disorders and its characteristic behaviors. Once a behavior is recognized in a disability perspective, strategies can be implemented which ensure great success to the child, parents, and early childhood educators. Resources for referral will be shared.

  • Credits: 2
ECE 427 Auth Assess/Guidance in ECE ECE-427
  • Students will examine the various methods of child study, observation, portfolio development, and other authentic assessment strategies as a way to assess children's growth and the development of knowledge and skills. Classroom management strategies will be explored including the effect of classroom practices and learning environments on children's behavior.

  • Credits: 2
ECE 326 Build Creatve Primry Classroom ECE-326
  • Emphasis is placed on an understanding of the history, goals, and current trends in the education of primary children. The focus of the course includes the development of a creative primary learning environment and strategies in achieving the standards set by the State of Minnesota.

  • Credits: 3
ECE 526 Curriculum & Instruction / ECE ECE-526
  • Along with the presentation of curriculum and instruction theory, this course will explore the development and implementation of early childhood curriculum and instruction. The link between assessment and program evaluation will be made.

  • Credits: 3
ECE 541 Diverse Classroom ECE-541
  • This course presents studies of education in multicultural settings. Students explore the values, beliefs, customs, and perceptions of racial and ethnic groups which affect social life and the education of children. Concepts of culture, social class, and power are developed.

  • Credits: 3
ECE 325 Ed of Infants & Toddlers ECE-325
  • This course includes the study of the emerging skills and developmental characteristics of infants and toddlers (birth to age three) and how to create an educational environment to promote their physical, cognitive, and social-emotional development. This course is designed to provide the skills for working with young children in a variety of settings. Course topics include the impact of the early years, behavior and guidance, health and safety issues, program and teacher licensure, and work with parents. This course, like all early childhood courses, includes the themes of developmentally and culturally appropriate practices, play, behavior guidance and partnerships with parents. (Prerequisite: PSY210)

  • Credits: 3
ECE 520 Effective Research Writing ECE-520
  • This course will emphasize the difference between academic writing for a master's program and writing for personal use. APA Formatting will be emphasized, strategies for developing a literature review, and writing for academic use will be included.

  • Credits: 3
ECE 577 eFolio and Completion ECE-577
  • This course assists students in synthesizing previous coursework leading to greater self-reflection and assessment of learning. In addition, the student will complete, present, and discuss the final M.A. Capstone eFolio.

  • Credits: 3
ECE 650 Intentional Tchng in ECE ECE-650
  • Along with the presentation of curriculum and instruction theory, this course will explore the development and implementation of early childhood curriculum and instruction in a child focused way that emphasized a Àlived curriculumÀ. The link between authentic assessment and program evaluation will be made.

  • Credits: 2
ECE 322 Kindergarten Endorsemnt Mthds ECE-322
  • Emphasis is placed on an understanding of the history and current trends for Kindergarten. The focus of the course includes the development of appropriate learning environments, activities, and strategies for intentional teaching in all curricula areas. This course, like all early childhood courses, includes the themes of developmentally and culturally appropriate practices, play, behavior guidance, and partnerships with parents.

  • Credits: 2
ECE 323 Kindergarten Methods ECE-323
  • Emphasis is placed on an understanding of the history and current trends for kindergarten. The focus of the course includes the development of appropriate learning environments, activities, interactions, and strategies for intentional teaching in all curricula areas. This course, like all early childhood courses, includes the themes of developmentally and culturally appropriate practices, play, behavior guidance, and partnerships with parents.

  • Credits: 2
ECE 324 Lang Dev & Emergent Literacy ECE-324
  • This course is designed to prepare educators and allied professionals to guide young children through the process of language acquisition and emergent literacy. The research and stages of language development from birth through age seven are extensively explored. Literacy strategies are explained, modeled, and experienced. The process of acquiring English as a second language and supportive strategies from adults and peers is also explored. This course, like all early childhood courses, includes the themes of developmentally and culturally appropriate practices, play, behavior guidance and partnerships with parents. Twenty-five hours working with young children is required. (Prerequisite: PSY210)

  • Credits: 3
ECE 544 Lang Dev & Emergent Literacy ECE-544
  • Current research is studied in regard to emergent literacy and language development in children with implications for the classroom teacher. Whole language strategies are explored for children from birth through age seven.

  • Credits: 3
ECE 576 Methods in EC Programming ECE-576
  • This course is an in-depth look at current literature that supports leadership in early childhood education and then extends learning to the complexities of quality programming in early childhood education.

  • Credits: 3
ECE 527 Observation and Assessment ECE-527
  • The various methods of child study, observation, portfolio development, and other assessment strategies are studied as a way to assess children's growth and the development of knowledge and skills. In addition, current classroom practices and learning environments are explored to identify changes that benefit children, their families, and communication between program and home.

  • Credits: 3
ECE 426 Org & Admin of EC Ed ECE-426
  • This course, which is normally completed during the student teaching semester, deals with the following administrative topics: responsibilities of the early childhood director, supervision and evaluation of staff, staff development, budgeting and finances, health maintenance and safety, parent involvement, and public relations. (Prerequisite: PSY210)

  • Credits: 1
ECE 522 Play: Theory and Applications ECE-522
  • This course is a study of the various theoretical foundations of play and their application to young children's development and learning. Students examine the role of the teacher in children's play, analyze play environments, and review the issues and research affecting children and curricula.

  • Credits: 3
ECE 321 Pre-Primary Education ECE-321
  • Emphasis is placed on an understanding of history and current trends for three, four, and five year olds in early childhood and kindergarten. The focus of the course includes the development of appropriate learning environments and teaching strategies for skilled, foundational, and impressional treatment of all curricular areas. This course, like all early childhood courses, includes the themes of developmentally and culturally appropriate practices, play, behavior guidance and partnerships with parents. This course includes 30 hours of practicum time with young children. (Prerequisite: PSY210)

  • Credits: 3
ECE 521 Topics & Research in Early Ed ECE-521
  • This course will explore the current research in early education focusing on the theme of evidence based practices by integrating theory with the activities of teacher researchers. Current empirical studies will be used to apply and understand research methods.

  • Credits: 3
ECE 523 Topics in ECE ECE-523
  • This course is a study of current issues in early childhood education in an historical context, emphasizing their relevance to and impact on today's programs for children ages eight and under.

  • Credits: 2
ECE 425 Young Child with Special Need ECE-425
  • This course is designed to introduce students to the laws and techniques needed to develop curricula and instruction to meet the unique needs of individual children in the early childhood setting. Emphasis is given to the integration of theories, research, practical application, and promotion of collaboration between early childhood professionals, special educators, and parents. Particular attention is given to authentic assessment which informs instruction, program planning, and individualization of activities. Also included is the presentation and discussion of the theory of behavior guidance in an inclusive early childhood classroom. May be taken in lieu of ED439. If so, 25+ human relations hours working with students with disabilities are required. This course, like all early childhood courses, includes the themes of developmentally and culturally appropriate practices, play, behavior guidance and partnerships with parents. (Prerequisite: PSY210)

  • Credits: 2
ECO 201 Econometrics ECO-201
  • This course will introduce students to basic econometrics, such as regression analysis and problems in regression analysis such as multicollinearity, heteroscadasticity, and autocorrelation. (Prerequisites: ECO102, MAT110)

  • Credits: 4
ECO 401 Global Economics ECO-401
  • This course will introduce students to the theories explaining trade and financial (exchange rates, foreign direct investment) markets in the economy. The course will also focus on policy issues in the trade and financial sectors such as the effectiveness of domestic trade and monetary policy, coordination of international exchange rates and the role of institutions such as the Federal Reserve System and the World Trade Organization in the present global economy. The course will also introduce students to national and local ethnic markets.

  • Credits: 4
ECO 101 Macroeconomics ECO-101
  • This course will illustrate the dynamic integration of America within the global economy by focusing on macroeconomics policy areas such as trade, exchange rate policy and domestic economic policy. The course will also introduce students to alternative theoretical frameworks such as classical, Keynesian, monetarism, rational expectations, Marxist, and institutionalist perspectives. The course will explore problems facing the less industrialized countries and the newly emerging countries and the United StatesÀ role in their development.

  • Credits: 4
ECO 102 Microeconomics ECO-102
  • This course will illustrate the dynamic integration of America within the global economy by focusing on the microeconomics issues such as the role of multinational corporations, antitrust policy, and strategic trade policy. The course will first introduce students to basic microeconomics theory such as market structure (perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly), factor markets, the role of government in the global economy, welfare reform, environmental policy and trade, and exchange rate policy. The course will then illustrate the global dimensions of domestic microeconomics policy. (Prerequisite: ECO101)

  • Credits: 2
ED 418 Adult Ed and Development ED-418
  • An overview of adult learning theory and development, psychological perspectives of the adult learner, educational implications of the adult system, teaching strategies and program development will be explored. Appropriate roles of leaders in adult education and methods used with adults are analyzed. A planning process for creating, developing, implementing and evaluating adult education programs is utilized. Application is made to adult education in various settings. The service-learning component of this course leads to direct involvement with adults in a variety of diverse learning settings. (Prerequisite: upper level standing)

  • Credits: 4
ED 7057 Adult Lrng Theories and Fndtns ED-7057
  • This course is designed for students to explore the methods and techniques grounded in adult educational theory, to help adultÕs learning in a variety of settings. This course will provide an instruction and introduction to critical reflections as a core capacity for teachers of adult learners.

  • Credits: 3
ED 7045 Advanced Leadership Ethics ED-7045
  • This course is designed to understand the moral and ethical imperative that faces leaders. It examines the virtues constructs of a leader, and how to resolve conflicts between personal ethics and organizational ethics. Moreover to apply and address complex ethical issues.

  • Credits: 3
ED 581 Applic of Educ Research ED-581
  • This is a study of current issues in differentiated instruction with emphasis on their relevance to and impact on today's educational programs. The impact of educational research on the development of educational theory and the improvement of educational practices in relation to differentiated learning is examined. Law and legislation that affects differentiated instruction will be reviewed. This course continues the process of selecting and implementing the capstone project and the literature review portion of the project is completed.

  • Credits: 4
ED 485 Assessment of ESL Students ED-485
  • This course prepares the student to undertake testing of students who do not have English as a first language. The course will deal with both the knowledge needed to perform both formal and informal assessments that are meaningful as well as the skills necessary to administer and accurately interpret assessments for limited English proficient students in at least two languages.

  • Credits: 2
ED 595 Capstone ED-595
  • As the final work submitted by a graduate student, and in respect to the guidelines for research base, analysis and synthesis, the students have three options in which they may design their closing assignment. Students may choose from a thesis, portfolio, or project style to complete their graduate experience.

  • Credits: 1
ED 493 Children’s Literature ED-493
  • An awareness of the elements characteristic of quality children's literature, an acquaintance with a wide variety of children's books for the elementary school, methods of presenting literature in the classroom, and the importance of the school library are considered.

  • Credits: 2
ED 560 Clinical Exp and Prof Foundtn ED-560
  • This experience provides direct teaching of learners to develop the understanding, skills, and dispositions necessary for implementing developmentally appropriate practices in the classroom.

  • Credits: 6
ED 532 Collab in Inclusive Settings ED-532
  • A study of applied best practices for implementing and sustaining collaborative teaching in inclusive settings.

  • Credits: 3
ED 483 Collaborative Teaching ED-483
  • This course is designed to help student develop the necessary skills to manage a program designed to meet the educational needs of children with mild to moderate learning and/or behavior problems in inclusive settings. Emphasis will be placed on referral procedures, collaboration skills, instructional planning, effective teaching strategies and adaptive materials. This experience provides teacher education students with an opportunity to gain specialized field experience in special education. SPED583: Graduate students will be required to do an action research project and to prepare a written report suitable for publication.

  • Credits: 3
ED 506 Community Learning Laboratory ED-506
  • Students are presented with rich opportunities to engage with kindergarten through grade 12 administrators, teachers, and students in a variety of settings. Topics include research supported findings in the following: learning and human development, teaching strategies, and personal qualities.

  • Credits: 3
ED 504 Comparative Educ Systems ED-504
  • This course will focus on other cultures and other systems of education in order to discover similarities and differences. Studies will concentrate on educational systems and processes within the U.S. and internationally, in addition to examining U.S. education from a global perspective. The material is focused on developing meaningful terminology and standards for education worldwide and building a framework for assessing the success of educational programs. Students will examine the field of education in the context of economic, political, and social forces as well as work to understand how the development of education in the past has influenced the present.

  • Credits: 3
ED 555 Cont/Mthds Tchg K-6 Art/Music ED-555
  • A study of the content, philosophy, materials, research, and strategies related to the teaching of art and music in the K-6 classroom.

  • Credits: 3
ED 552 Cont/Mthds Tchg K-6 Hlth/Mvmt ED-552
  • A study of the content, philosophy, materials, research, and strategies related to the teaching of health and movement in the K-6 classroom.

  • Credits: 3
ED 548 Cont/Mthds Tchg K-6 Literacy ED-548
  • A study of the content, philosophy, materials, research, and strategies related to the teaching of literacy in the K-6 classroom.

  • Credits: 3
ED 550 Cont/Mthds Tchg K-6 Math ED-550
  • A study of the content, philosophy, materials, research, and strategies related to the teaching of mathematics in the K-6 classroom.

  • Credits: 3
ED 551 Cont/Mthds Tchg K-6 Science ED-551
  • A study of the content, philosophy, materials, research, and strategies related to the teaching of science in the K-6 classroom.

  • Credits: 3
ED 553 Cont/Mthds Tchg K-6 Soc Std ED-553
  • A study of the content, philosophy, materials, research, and strategies related to the teaching of social studies in the K-6 classroom.

  • Credits: 3
ED 360 Content & Mthd for K-6 Mathema ED-360
  • This course provides opportunity for students to learn and apply the content, conceptual framework, and theories of teaching and learning of the elementary school mathematics curriculum. (Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education program.)

  • Credits: 3
ED 202 Critical Dispositions for Tchr ED-202
  • An introduction to Concordia's teacher education program including its rationale and procedures for admission, retention and completion of the program. Students are introduced to the teaching profession and explore their own currently held understandings, beliefs and dispositions about teaching. This course is intended for transfer students who have previously taken an introduction to teaching course. (Prerequisite: PSY210, 220 or 215)

  • Credits: 1
ED 7036 Critical Issues/Analy Pub Pol ED-7036
  • Educational policy-making processes are examined at the macro (national, regional and state) and micro ( local and institutional) levels using a variety of policy models. Selected educational policies at the macro and micro levels are analyzed, using different policy models. Students are expected to identify the factors such as the actors involved, politics, and economical inputs that impact policy formation and implementation.

  • Credits: 3
ED 554 Curriculum & Instruction ED-554
  • A study of the role of the educational leader to develop and implement curriculum design and effective instructional methods and strategies.

  • Credits: 3
ED 7041 Data Analys and Use for Leadrs ED-7041
  • This course is designed for students in leadership roles to provide them the skills to use data to make informed decisions at the organizational leadership level by providing a link between analysis of data and decision making. Using actual data collected from various levels of the organization they will use statistical analysis to create and organizational strategic plan and demonstrate how it will redesign the organization.

  • Credits: 3
ED 7004 Data Use & Analysis for Prin ED-7004
  • This course will provide the learner an opportunity to use data to inform decision making at the principal level by providing a link between research and practice. Using actual data from their school or district students will learn and use statistical data to create a school improvement plan (SIP) and present it as a project in the course.

  • Credits: 3
ED 7035 Data Use/Analy for Superintend ED-7035
  • This course will provide the learner an opportunity to use data to inform decision making at the district office level by providing a link between research and practice. Using actual data from their district students will learn and use statistical data to create a district improvement plan (DIP) and present it as a project in the course.

  • Credits: 3
ED 598 Directed Studies in Education ED-598
  • Key educational topics will be explored and students will make connections between those topics and other program requirements.

  • Credits: 3
ED 7062 Dissertation ED-7062
  • This course is the start of the dissertation development. Most of this will be time spent with the advisor and writing the first three chapters of the dissertation. The candidate will conduct their research. The sequence of expected outcomes are as follows: 1) the candidate will finalize the first three chapters, and begin, or finish collection of data, to conduct an analysis of the data collected. Start to draw inferences from the data, and 2) work with their advisor in developing their dissertation and prepare for its defense.

  • Credits: 0
ED 7050 Dissertation Preparation ED-7050
  • This course is designed to provide the students with the skills to: a) develop a research plan, b) develop a line of research, c) understand the use of research methodology, d) conduct a scholarly literature review, e) conduct a comprehensive literature review, f) begin to develop a research topic, and g) start to develop a framework of a dissertation proposal.

  • Credits: 3
ED 507 Diversity in Education ED-507
  • A study of the issues and approaches to educating a culturally and linguistically diverse population and those with learning difficulties.

  • Credits: 3
ED 7055 Doctorate Field Exp/Research ED-7055
  • This course is to offer for doctorate students to engage in a Doctorate Field Experience/Research in an organization of their choosing that will enhance their research agenda. They will develop an understanding of how organizations function.

  • Credits: 3
ED 363 ECE Practicum ED-363
  • This course provides an early field experience for students prior to student teaching. Students are assigned to work with a cooperating teacher at a grade level appropriate to their license. The course is taken concurrently with methods courses to relate theory to practice. Students are usually placed in diverse, urban classrooms. (Prerequisite: admission to Teacher Education Program)

  • Credits: 4
ED 522 Ed Fndtns and Ethical Issues ED-522
  • Learners focus on the philosophical, historical, sociological, and legal foundations upon which current educational theory and practice are constructed. Emphasis is placed on ethical issues related to the field of education.

  • Credits: 3
ED 380 Ed of Exceptional Children ED-380
  • This course is designed to explore the various areas of exceptionality among children of school age. Awareness of the scope and nature of the exceptionality, essential educational procedures and available rehabilitative and legal resources will be studied. The course will include a series of pre-practicum experiences documenting a variety of grade levels. SPED580: Graduate students will be required to complete additional reading and research and to prepare a class presentation.

  • Credits: 3
ED 521 Educ Research & Applications ED-521
  • Mastering the systematic and rigorous process of posing a focused question, developing a hypothesis, testing the hypothesis, collecting and analyzing relevant data and drawing conclusions.

  • Credits: 3
ED 502 Educational Issues ED-502
  • A study of historical and contemporary issues in education. Students explore the social and academic goals of education, the current conditions of the nationÕs educational system, the teaching profession and the future of American education.

  • Credits: 3
ED 336 Educational Psychology ED-336
  • This course applies the basic principles of human development and behavior to the classroom situation. Emphasis is given to the teacher education conceptual framework, theoretical backgrounds in learning, and their application to the classroom. Topics include the characteristics of children, student variability, educational planning and instructional objectives, classroom management and assessment. A 15 hour field experience that satisfies a portion of the university's human relations requirement is included.

  • Credits: 3
ED 594 Eff Pract Differentiated Lrng ED-594
  • An examination of brain-based learning practices for differentiating instruction for all learners.

  • Credits: 3
ED 503 Effective Comm for Educators ED-503
  • This course will focus on providing foundational communication skills for educators. All coursework is based on an integrated skills approach with listening, speaking, reading, writing, and grammatical components. Course content focuses on the exploration of U.S. educational systems for students at all levels who study in various physical environments. Students will visit schools. The application of the content in response to the fieldwork will give the student a familiarity with conversational American English, as well as an integration of the common grammatical structures of colloquial English in writing, reading, speaking, and listening. It is further designed to prepare students for academic success in U.S. college degree programs through a final written project to be presented orally.

  • Credits: 3
ED 345 Effective Elementary Teacher ED-345
  • Instructional methods and materials that have wide application to the elementary grade levels are examined. Particular emphasis is given to such topics as the decision-making inherent in teaching (CSP model), effective instruction (planning, critical presentation skills, student interest, motivation, and involvement, etc.) and effective classroom management. (Prerequisite: admission to Teacher Education Program) Enrollment is concurrent with ED371 Teaching Practicum.

  • Credits: 2
ED 346 Effective Middle School Teach ED-346
  • The historical, sociological, psychological and philosophical aspects of the middle school are studied. Discussion and activities focus on the purposes, functions and implications of the curriculum and the learner. Students explore middle school teaching practice and student learning in the classroom and current middle school organization and practice. (Prerequisite: admission to Teacher Education Program)

  • Credits: 2
ED 347 Effective Secondary Teacher ED-347
  • This course provides a study of the purposes, history, philosophy, organization, operation, students, curriculum, teaching practices, and current problems of secondary schools in the United States. Emphasis is on the knowledge and skills necessary to teach effectively in a secondary school. (Prerequisite: admission to Teacher Education Program)

  • Credits: 2
ED 549 Effective Teaching ED-549
  • This course develops the skills of planning, implementing, and evaluating for the decision-making, reflective practitioner. Topics of study will include such things as instructional planning, assessment, differentiation, technology, classroom management, and others.

  • Credits: 3
ED 7060 eFolio Review of Competencies ED-7060
  • Written Comprehensive Exam that must be passed prior to registration for ED7061.

  • Credits: 0
ED 7056 Elective Research Methods ED-7056
  • This course is designed so students will select a research methodology that is in alignment with their proposed research. They will study in depth this design and will begin to develop and prepare for their dissertation proposal

  • Credits: 3
ED 547 Emergnt Lang Acquis and Devlp ED-547
  • The process of emergent language acquisition and development is studied. Literacy strategies are explored, modeled, and experienced. Methods for working with English language learners are addressed.

  • Credits: 3
ED 389 ESOL Methods ED-389
  • In this course students will become more aware of the nature of language, particularly of English and of how language is acquired/taught. The focus will be on the components of language teaching, as well as methodology and evaluation. Specific goals include students increasing their awareness of the grammar of English and learning to use reference grammars to answer questions; students understanding different approaches and methods to language teaching and incorporating them into a syllabus and/or lesson plans; students learning current basic theories of how language is acquired; students selecting and using materials and ready to teach language; and, students assessing English language proficiency and evaluating language performance.

  • Credits: 4
ED 512 Ethical Issues for Prof. Educ. ED-512
  • A study of ethics and moral philosophy with application to the field of education. Current educational issues will be examined in the context of the lives and careers of the PK-12 educator.

  • Credits: 3
ED 7008 Ethics & Interpers Effective ED-7008
  • This course is designed to have potential principals examine their own personal ethical profiles and communication styles in light of the ethical struggles they are certain to experience in their lives as school administrators. They will be required to reflect on their communication behaviors in light of their roles as educational leaders and relate those behaviors to ethical theory.

  • Credits: 3
ED 7038 Ethics & Interpers Effective ED-7038
  • This course is designed to have potential superintendents examine their own personal ethical profiles and communication styles in light of the ethical struggles they are certain to experience in their lives as school district administrators. They will be required to reflect on their communication behaviors in light of their roles as educational leaders and relate those behaviors to ethical theory.

  • Credits: 3
ED 582 Ethics for Educators ED-582
  • This course is a study of ethics and moral philosophy with applications to making decisions regarding current social and personal problems.

  • Credits: 3
ED 515 Family Systems for Educators ED-515
  • A study of diversity in family systems to include a survey of current developments in the study of the family and the analysis of changes in American society and their influence on family life.

  • Credits: 3
ED 544 Field Experience I ED-544
  • This course engages students in collaborative partnerships with a network of cooperating schools providing students with the opportunity to participate in a classroom teaching experience. The course is designed whereby students apply research and their knowledge of content and effective instructional practices.

  • Credits: 3
ED 545 Field Experience II ED-545
  • This course engages students in collaborative partnerships with a network of cooperating schools providing students with the opportunity to participate in a classroom teaching experience. The course is designed whereby students apply research and their knowledge of content and effective instructional practices.

  • Credits: 3
ED 546 Field Experience III ED-546
  • This course engages students in collaborative partnerships with a network of cooperating schools providing students with the opportunity to participate in a classroom teaching experience. The course is designed whereby students apply research and their knowledge of content and effective instructional practices.

  • Credits: 3
ED 7007 Finance & Bus Mgmt for Princ ED-7007
  • This course is designed as a comprehensive overview of public school finance and business management. Students examine the economic, political, and management issues facing public school principals. Lessons address resource allocation and resource distribution in light of the principles of liberty, adequacy, and equity.

  • Credits: 3
ED 201 Foundations & Intro to Edu ED-201
  • Concordia's teacher education program and its conceptual framework are introduced to students in this course. This course introduces students to the philosophical, historical, sociological, and legal foundations upon which current educational theory and practice is constructed. During the duration of the course students need to register for required MTLE Basic Skills Test (additional fee). A 15-hour field experience that satisfies a portion of the university's human relations requirement is included. Admission to Program is an outcome including development of efolio and admittance to program interview.

  • Credits: 3
ED 385 Foundations of Education ED-385
  • This course introduces students to the philosophical, historical, sociological and legal foundations upon which current educational theory and practice is constructed. Students will demonstrate a clear understanding of: the role of schools as organizations within the larger community, including the historic figures and events that contributed to these under-standings; the legal rights and responsibilities of students, teachers and schools within the society; importance of ethics and collaboration as part of educational practice; the diversity of philosophical approach to learning and instruction; and the variety of student needs that schools must address in public and Lutheran schools in the United States. (Prerequisite: upper level standing)

  • Credits: 3
ED 7002 HR for Principals ED-7002
  • This course examines the human resources available to principals. It examines the functions and practices in school systems that principals deal with daily. Approaches to management, motivation, professional development, and performance are addressed along with obstacles to effective team development.

  • Credits: 3
ED 7032 HR Issues for Superintendents ED-7032
  • This course examines the human resources available to superintendents and related fiscal issues. It examines the functions and practices in school systems that superintendents deal with daily. Approaches to management, motivation, professional development, and performance are addressed along with obstacles to effective team development.

  • Credits: 3
ED 530 Human Diversity & Relations ED-530
  • This course helps students experience, understand, and become sensitive to human diversity and presents strategies for teaching human relations skills in the classroom setting. A 15-hour community service field experience that satisfies a portion of the university's human relations requirement is included and required.

  • Credits: 2
ED 330 Human Diversity and Relations ED-330
  • This course helps students experience, understand and become sensitive to human diversity and presents strategies for teaching human relations skills in the classroom setting. A 15-hour field experience that satisfies a portion of the university's human relations requirement is included.

  • Credits: 2
ED 7042 Human Res Mgmt Todays Orgs ED-7042
  • This course is designed so students will develop an understanding of the significance of human resources available to leaders and related fiscal issues they will examine the current application, research and theoretical perspectives on human resources management practices in an educational setting. Particular attention will is given to the scholarly evaluation of theoretical and practical issues addressed by educational leaders. This course will provide an overview of strategies HR and the leadersÕ role in acquiring, developing, rewarding and managing the performance of talent in a highly complex academic environment. Moreover, this course will address important topics on staff relations and legal issues as they related to managing staff.

  • Credits: 3
ED 537 Inclusion in Diverse Classroom ED-537
  • Learners experience, understand, and become sensitive to human diversity and develop strategies for teaching human relations skills in the classroom setting. Prospective educators are introduced to legislation and practices related to the inclusion of students with unique learning needs in the regular classroom.

  • Credits: 3
ED 7047 Influences & Assess Pub Policy ED-7047
  • This course examines the knowledge of how public policy is developed, and how research is used to develop public policy. The theoretical framework is to examine the literature regarding the internal and external influences on public policy and how organizations and individuals implement and react to this influence. The course will examine what is good public policy.

  • Credits: 3
ED 543 Intro Fld Exp: Instrct. Strat. ED-543
  • This course prepares learners in developing an understanding of the instructional strategies and leadership skills necessary for teaching and leading in multiple school settings.

  • Credits: 3
ED 7000 Intro to Adv Grad Education ED-7000
  • This course will be an introduction to advanced graduate programs that include an Educational specialist (Ed.S.) degree and an Educational Doctorate (Ed.D.) degree. Units of study will emphasize research, writing, presentations, and fiscal policy. Legal concerns, etc. In addition, discussions and assignments related to current issues in education will be a major component of this seminar.

  • Credits: 3
ED 7049 Intro to Doctorate Level Educ ED-7049
  • This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge base of the requirements to be considered a doctorate candidate and the expectations that come with that candidacy. In addition, students will be prepared in the requirements of scholarly publication, scholarly presentations, develop skills in preparing a Professional Development Plan, (PDP), with obtainable goals, and how to submit an IRB for approval.

  • Credits: 1
ED 7046 Intro to Scholarly Research ED-7046
  • This course begins the theoretical discussion of the primary research designs used in educational research. The curricular goal is to establish a foundation for success interaction with the research literature used throughout the program of study. One goal of educational research is to provide knowledge that leads to strategies and action for solutions and change. Students will gain experience developing a framework for consuming the research literature in educational leadership.

  • Credits: 3
ED 535 Intro to Teaching Children ED-535
  • Human growth and development from the prenatal stages to the elementary years is reviewed. Concordia's teacher education program and its conceptual framework are introduced. Learners reflect on teaching as a profession and explore beliefs, understandings, and dispositions in relation to teaching children.

  • Credits: 3
ED 200 Introduction to Teaching ED-200
  • An introduction to Concordia's teacher education program including its rationale and procedures for admission, retention and completion of the program. Students are introduced to the teaching profession and explore their own currently held understandings, beliefs and dispositions about teaching. 25 Human Relation hours are required.

  • Credits: 1
ED 509 Issues in Diff & Gifted Educ ED-509
  • This course is a study of the impact of educational research on the development and the improvement of educational practices in relation to differentiated instruction with emphasis on gifted education. The course continues the process of developing the individual capstone project.

  • Credits: 3
ED 290 Language and Society ED-290
  • This course examines the diverse nature of human language and the social factors that influence it such as culture, age, gender, social class, setting, topic, and identity. In its study of languages, dialects, codes, and society, the course attempts to foster multicultural understanding and to diminish American ethnocentrism.

  • Credits: 4
ED 7043 Leadership Exemplars ED-7043
  • This course is design for students to study in-depth the attributes for leaders who have affected change and examine their methodologies to effect change. Students will examine such areas as what characteristics those leaders demonstrated, their problem solving strategies and how they created a culture of change. This course will examine how leadership can impact an organizationÕs culture, structure, productivity, decision making, and resource allocation. It will examine not only the difference between management and leadership but also more effective in todayÕs educational organizations. The course will examine the impact of capital, planning, staffing finances and visioning. It will examine the many challenges educational leaders face in a constant changing environment.

  • Credits: 3
ED 7044 Leading Change in Todays Orgs ED-7044
  • This course will examine the dynamics that influence the leadership of Real time/Relevant organizations, including such variable as changing demographics, workforce, economics, and technology. It will examine how leaders must not only be cognizant of these dynamics but must also develop strategies to address them.

  • Credits: 3
ED 508 Legal & Ethical Issues in Educ ED-508
  • A study of legal issues, professional ethics, and moral philosophy with applications to the field of education.

  • Credits: 3
ED 539 Legal and Legislative Issues ED-539
  • This course will deal with law and legislation that affects early childhood education. Children and childcare are presented as issues of public policy. The skills and strategies of child advocacy are discussed and students are challenged to become active in public advocacy for children

  • Credits: 3
ED 540 Legal and Legislative Issues ED-540
  • Those in leadership positions find themselves with a greater duty to recognize and respond to legal issues. This course examines how law defines policy in areas impacting the business of criminal justice, including due process, civil rights, equal protection, employment law, civil liability, and criminal procedure. In addition to identifying emerging law, this class addresses the political science of public policy at jurisdictional levels, including the United States Supreme Court.

  • Credits: 4
ED 7006 Legal Issues for Principals ED-7006
  • This course examines the reality of legal issues that the everyday principal must face nearly every day of the school year. The focus is on local, state, and national legal principles and issues related to students and employees. Individual rights and responsibilities related to the legal process, structure of the law, legislation, litigation, and current legal issues are examined in detail.

  • Credits: 3
ED 7033 Legal Issues/Superintendents ED-7033
  • This course examines the reality of legal issues that the superintendent must face nearly every day of the school year. The focus is on local, state, and national legal principles and issues related to faculty, students, and employees. Individual rights and responsibilities related to the legal process, structure of the law, legislation, litigation, and current legal issues are examined in detail.

  • Credits: 3
ED 596 Lifelong Learning ED-596
  • While this course is the culminating event in the educational experience, it also sets the stage for new beginnings. The focus is on a combined reflection and synthesis on knowledge learned throughout the program. In seminar fashion, students will discuss with each other the significant issues they have studied, and ways they will continue to learn in the future.

  • Credits: 3
ED 7048 Org Theory and Analysis ED-7048
  • This course focuses on the leadership skills needed to understand the theoretical framework of organizational decision-making, innovations, and identity. The construct in this course is to understand what the central analysis of decision making and what key concepts of decision making are central to organizations.

  • Credits: 3
ED 7051 Overview of Research Method ED-7051
  • This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of the methods of research methods. Students will be an introduced to how to conduct research, what research is, and how to conduct analysis. Students will use this class as an opportunity to refine and expand on their research topic and dissertation proposal.

  • Credits: 3
ED 511 Portfolio and Synthesis ED-511
  • This course assists students in synthesizing previous coursework leading to greater self-reflection and assessment of learning. In addition, the student will present and discuss the final MA Capstone eFolio.

  • Credits: 3
ED 7005 Princ & Facilitation of Change ED-7005
  • This course focuses on theories and strategies for leading change in the educational setting. Emphasis is placed on systemic change at the building level. It will consider aspects of change in well managed schools that focus on diverse learner needs as well as safe learning environments that promote a culture of excellence.

  • Credits: 3
ED 386 Princ of Bilingual Education ED-386
  • This course provides a basic understanding of the history and development of the bilingual education in the United States. Students will learn about the different bilingual education program models and their implications for implementation.

  • Credits: 4
ED 7009 Principal Internship 1 ED-7009
  • This full year course is an internship that requires the students to complete a minimum of 320 clock hours over two consecutive semesters at a university-approved school. Under the supervision and support of a university-approved onsite mentor and a university supervisor, the students will identify, plan, and complete a School Improvement Project (SIP) and a variety of administrative tasks, projects, and assignments designed to strengthen performance and professional skills that will assist the students to become a licensed principal in the state of Minnesota

  • Credits: 2
ED 7010 Principal Internship 2 ED-7010
  • This full year course is an internship that requires the students to complete a minimum of 320 clock hours over two consecutive semesters at a university-approved school. Under the supervision and support of a university-approved onsite mentor and a university supervisor, the students will identify, plan, and complete a School Improvement Project (SIP) and a variety of administrative tasks, projects, and assignments designed to strengthen performance and professional skills that will assist the students to become a licensed principal in the state of Minnesota.

  • Credits: 2
ED 7011 Principal Internship 3 ED-7011
  • This full year course is an internship that requires the students to complete a minimum of 320 clock hours over two consecutive semesters at a university-approved school. Under the supervision and support of a university-approved onsite mentor and a university supervisor, the students will identify, plan, and complete a School Improvement Project (SIP) and a variety of administrative tasks, projects, and assignments designed to strengthen performance and professional skills that will assist the students to become a licensed principal in the state of Minnesota.

  • Credits: 2
ED 7012 Principal Internship 4 ED-7012
  • This full year course is an internship that requires the students to complete a minimum of 320 clock hours over two consecutive semesters at a university-approved school. Under the supervision and support of a university-approved onsite mentor and a university supervisor, the students will identify, plan, and complete a School Improvement Project (SIP) and a variety of administrative tasks, projects, and assignments designed to strengthen performance and professional skills that will assist the students to become a licensed principal in the state of Minnesota.

  • Credits: 2
ED 7001 Principal Ldrshp in 21st Cent ED-7001
  • This course is designed for individuals who desire to pursue a principal position in the future. The primary focus is on the knowledge and skills of leaders who create cultures of excellence; respond to diverse learner needs; facilitate the development of safe, efficient, and effective learning environments; and impact the political, social, economic, legal, and cultural contexts that shape Minnesota schools.

  • Credits: 3
ED 7003 Principal’s Role in Inst Super ED-7003
  • This course investigates the role of the principal relevant to the supervision of instruction and evaluation of teacher performance for the purpose of instructional improvement. A variety of theoretical models for instructional supervision will be reviewed along with their pros and cons. Students will practice supervisory and evaluative strategies.

  • Credits: 3
ED 514 Psych of Lrng & Tchg in Schls ED-514
  • An overview of the application of psychological principles, theories, and strategies to issues of learning and teaching in school settings.

  • Credits: 3
ED 7053 Qualitative Research Methods ED-7053
  • This course is designed to offer investigations into traditional and exploratory processes of qualitative research, and will provide the critical analysis tools necessary for doing such research. Doctorate candidates will develop skills in the examination and critique of traditional qualitative methodology such as; a) sampling, b) instrumentation, c) determine authenticity, d) data collection, e) data analysis, and f) research format. Students will explore and study such genres as, but not limited to case study, and narrative inquiry. A requirement of this course will be for students to develop a research design using the qualitative methodology.

  • Credits: 3
ED 7052 Quantitative Research Methods ED-7052
  • This course is designed to offer an overview of quantitative research methods. Areas to be addressed in this course are sampling, measurements and instrumentation, research design, and conducting an analysis. The course addresses developing research questions and hypotheses, selecting research methods, and supporting conclusions for research. Compute assisted data analysis will be applied. Such specific content will be: a) understanding the deviations and correlations, b) relations among variables, c) reliability and validity, d) statistical inferences, e) regression analysis., f) use of most recent edition of SPSS, and g) factor analysis. A requirement of this course will be for students to develop a research design using the quantitative methodology.

  • Credits: 3
ED 487 Reading Across Content Areas ED-487
  • The range of standardized and informal assessment options will be studied. Techniques will include the administration of procedures including analyzing data and making instructional and placement decisions. Communication of results to students' parents, caregivers and other professionals; impact on career skills affecting employability; and ethical issues will be discussed. (Prerequisite to Student Teaching.)

  • Credits: 3
ED 7040 Relevant Ed Ldrshp/Ed Reform ED-7040
  • This course is designed for students who are pursing leadership in education. This course will examine the skills, knowledge and disposition required for Real time/Relevant organizational leaders. Students will study the political, social, economic, legal, and cultural contexts that shape todayÕs organizations.

  • Credits: 3
ED 590 Research & Complete Capstone ED-590
  • A review and critical analysis of current educational research focused on a specific question. Students complete the capstone project.

  • Credits: 3
ED 7034 School Dist & Comm Relations ED-7034
  • This course focuses on PK-12 school districts developing and sustaining district, family, and community relationships based on collaborative initiatives that help all children learn. Emphasis is placed on selected issues, including communication with the diversity of internal and external publics, including older adults, employee associations, governing boards, parents, and students.

  • Credits: 3
ED 390 SEAT Seminar ED-390
  • This course provides opportunities for the student in the S.E.A.T. program to explore different topics of interest to educators. It is designed to help participants to move from the roles of para-educator to professional teacher.

  • Credits: 1
ED 348 Second Language Acquisition ED-348
  • This course examines both the cognitive aspects of second language acquisitions, and the social and cultural ones. The acquisition of the second language and the first language are compared and contrasted. The acquisition of language in a multilingual environment is explored.

  • Credits: 4
ED 500 Seminar A ED-500
  • This course assists students in synthesizing previous coursework leading to greater self-reflection and assessment of learning.

  • Credits: 2
ED 505 Seminar B ED-505
  • This course assists students in synthesizing previous coursework leading to greater self-reflection and assessment of learning.

  • Credits: 2
ED 510 Seminar C ED-510
  • This course assists students in synthesizing previous coursework leading to greater self-reflection and assessment of learning. In addition, the student will present and discuss the final MA Capstone eFolio.

  • Credits: 3
ED 372 Spec. Ed.:General Ed Practicum ED-372
  • This course give the undergraduate special education teacher candidate an opportunity to observe in a regular education classroom, teach their created lessons to both general education and special education students in an inclusive environment, to reflect on those lessons, and modify their future lessons dependent upon the formative assessment of the studentsÕ work.

  • Credits: 2
ED 7058 Strategies for Adult Learning ED-7058
  • This course is designed for students to examine and understand the methods, strategies, practices, technology, and tools employed in facilitating adult learning. The course will focus on preparing students as an educational leaders in the development, implementation and evaluations of adults learning programs ranging from short-term programs to long term programs that are designed to advance professional development.

  • Credits: 3
ED 464 Student Teaching ED-464
  • Student teaching provides direct teaching experiences for students to develop the understanding, attitudes and skills necessary for facilitating discussion with groups of parents. Students are assigned to work with a licensed parent educator. Seminars are held on campus. A capstone project is part of the experience. (Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education Program and completion of all coursework in the Parent Educator major.)

  • Credits: 8
ED 471 Student Teaching ED-471
  • Student teaching provides direct teaching experience for students to develop the understanding, skills, and dispositions necessary for implementing developmentally appropriate practices in classrooms for young children. Typically, students are assigned to work with two cooperating teachers in two different classrooms for one full semester. Seminars are held on campus and a capstone portfolio is required. (Birth-Grade 3 Practicum.)

  • Credits: 4
ED 492 Students w/Emo. Beh. Needs ED-492
  • This course is an examination of the social/emotional needs of learners in contemporary classrooms and research-based practices for meeting those needs. It also provides teachers of students with emotionally/behaviorally disorders an understanding of and practice with positive interventions for the general education classroom.

  • Credits: 3
ED 7039 Superintendent Internship ED-7039
  • This full year course is an internship that requires the students to complete a minimum of 320 clock hours over two consecutive semesters at a university-approved school. Under the supervision and support of a university-approved onsite mentor and a university supervisor, the students will identify, plan, and complete a District Improvement Project (DIP) and a variety of administrative tasks, projects, and assignments designed to strengthen performance and professional skills that will assist the students to become a licensed superintendent in the state of Minnesota.

  • Credits: 2
ED 556 Supervision & Improv Instruct ED-556
  • Theory and practice of supervision of educational programs and personnel with a focus on improvement.

  • Credits: 3
ED 7037 Supt & Facilitation of Change ED-7037
  • This course focuses on theories and strategies for leading change in the educational setting at the district office level. Emphasis is placed on systemic change within the district. It will consider aspects of change in well managed school districts that focus on diverse learner needs, legal accountability, and safe learning environments that promote a culture of excellence.

  • Credits: 3
ED 7031 Supt Ldrshp 21st Cent School ED-7031
  • This course is designed for individuals who desire to pursue a superintendent position in the future. The primary focus is on the knowledge and skills of school district leaders who create cultures of excellence; respond to diverse learner needs; facilitate the development of safe, efficient, and effective learning environments; and impact the political, social, economic, legal, and cultural contexts that shape Minnesota schools districts.

  • Credits: 3
ED 585 Synthesizing Seminar 1 ED-585
  • The culminating project of the master's program is the capstone, a research project designed to help learners generate new information for their field. Explanation of the capstone process will take place, along with a dialog regarding possible capstone topics.

  • Credits: 2
ED 586 Synthesizing Seminar 2 ED-586
  • This course continues the process of selecting and implementing the capstone project. Issues of epistemology and social change are discussed and explored.

  • Credits: 2
ED 534 Tchg Stdts w/Mental Hlth Needs ED-534
  • A study of classroom strategies, state and district initiatives and support resources that help children and youth with mental health needs learn successfully in the inclusive classroom setting.

  • Credits: 3
ED 538 Tchg Stdts/Math & Literacy Dif ED-538
  • Awareness and examination of the scope and sequence of math and literacy skills students need to be successful in the inclusive classroom in the academic areas of reading, writing, and speaking.

  • Credits: 3
ED 382 Tchg. w/Linguistic Differences ED-382
  • This course builds on ED342 Teaching Literacy. In this course students will learn how to facilitate the development of the reading skills in two languages and the transference of the skill developed in one language to a second one. Particular attention will be paid to the specific problems of non-native English speakers learning to read English. SPED582 Graduate students will be required to complete additional reading and research.

  • Credits: 3
ED 375 Tchng Pract:Kdrgrtn Endrs Exp ED-375
  • This course provides a field experience for students taking the Kindergarten Endorsement Methods course. Students are assigned to work with a cooperating teacher at the Kindergarten level and often in diverse, urban classrooms. The course is typically taken upon completion of Kindergarten Endorsement Methods to relate theory to practice. This course will be effective until June 30 2012.

  • Credits: 1
ED 536 Tchng Stdts w/Ling Diff ED-536
  • A study of the issues and approaches to educating a culturally and linguistically diverse population.

  • Credits: 3
ED 481 Tchng. Stdts w/Learning & Beh ED-481
  • This course is an examination of the social /emotional needs of learners in contemporary classrooms and research-based practices for meeting those needs. It also provides teachers of students with emotionally/behaviorally disorders an understanding of and practice with positive interventions for the general education classroom. The historical, theoretical, and educational perspectives concerning children and youth who manifest learning disabilities will be considered utilizing diagnostic and remediation of weaknesses in basic content areas. Special emphasis will be placed on teaching cognitive instructional strategies.

  • Credits: 3
ED 477 Teach 5-8 Comm Arts/Lit ED-477
  • This course will help the prospective teacher understand and apply current theories of communication arts instruction with its focus on practical strategies and sills essential to the teaching of reading, writing, speaking, listening, media literacy, and literature at the middle school level. (Prerequisite: admission to Teacher Education Program.)

  • Credits: 1
ED 476 Teach 5-8 Social Studies ED-476
  • Teaching Middle Level Social Studies is a methods class that provides the student with the social studies curriculum, and specific methods required to teach in the middle school. The knowledge, skills, and values that provide curriculum content will be identified as well as a variety of approaches and issues for instruction. The student will be able to develop a social studies framework reflecting current thought and provide leadership in the school setting for social studies instruction. This course will provide the middle grade teacher with the concepts needed to make appropriate instructional decisions.( Prerequisite: admission to Teacher Education Program.)

  • Credits: 1
ED 355 Teach 9-12 Comm Arts/Lit ED-355
  • This course provides students with an understanding of basic theory and practice in teaching literature, speech, communication, and composition in grades 9À12. It includes instruction in unit planning and implementation, the use of media resources, testing and evaluation, individualizing instruction, and curriculum evaluation and planning. It also introduces some study of the history of and present trends in the teaching of literature and communication. Prerequisite: admission to Teacher Education Program. (Prerequisite to secondary student teaching)

  • Credits: 2
ED 356 Teach Elem Science/Envirn Ed ED-356
  • In a laboratory setting, students actively explore science concepts and skills. They become familiar with materials and methodology especially well suited to the teaching of elementary school science and assessment of the associated learning, as well as recognize the central role of science in the development of enthusiastic learning and innovative, integrative and critical thought. (Prerequisite: admission to Teacher Education Program) Enrollment is concurrent with ED371 Teaching Practicum.

  • Credits: 3
ED 357 Teach Elem Social Studies ED-357
  • This course reviews the content, methods, materials and research related to the teaching of elementary social studies (KÀ6th Grade). Attention is given to the content of the social studies curriculum and its basis within the social sciences, global education, experiential learning, concept development, inquiry methods, moral development, assessment, Minnesota standards, and critical thinking. (Prerequisite: admission to Teacher Education Program) Enrollment is concurrent with ED371 Teaching Practicum.

  • Credits: 2
ED 448 Teach Meth EL/MS Movmt Ed ED-448
  • This course provides students with the basic principles of effective instruction in movement education at the Elementary/Middle School level (KÀ8). The course addresses curriculum content, philosophy development, objective writing and annual/unit/daily lesson planning teaching skills, methods, class organization, progression of skill, and evaluation as it relates to creating an effective physical education program that promotes lifelong physical activity. Instructional subjects will include locomotor/non-locomotor skills, manipulatives, elementary games, fitness activities, and some sport skill development. (Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program.) Prerequisite to student teaching. (Not required if student completes KHS330)

  • Credits: 1
ED 475 Teaching 5-8 Math ED-475
  • This course provides opportunities to develop an understanding of the content of middle school mathematics programs and formulate a teaching methodology for the meaningful learning of mathematics by middle school students. Students will be challenged to reflect on their personal views of mathematics, on how middle school children learn mathematics and on classroom environments that help middle school children understand mathematics. Teaching from a problem-solving perspective and making communication, reasoning and connections the primary foci of mathematics learning will be central to the course.(Prerequisite: admission to Teacher Education Program.)

  • Credits: 1
ED 478 Teaching 5-8 Science ED-478
  • This course is designed to provide teaching methods to use at the middle school level. (Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education program)

  • Credits: 1
ED 351 Teaching 9-12 Mathematics ED-351
  • This course emphasizes the content and methods for teaching secondary mathematics. The course includes curriculum design, effective instructional strategies, methods of using technology to enhance student learning, procedures for assessment of student learning, and a high school field experience. (Pre-requisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program, MAT110 and MAT135)

  • Credits: 4
ED 353 Teaching 9-12 Science ED-353
  • This course emphasizes instructional methods specific to the teaching of science in secondary schools. Topics covered include goals and objectives, individualized instruction, lesson planning, inquiry, lab use and safety, evaluation and testing, science and societal issues, field trips and fieldwork, science fairs, computers and professional organizations. Prerequisite: admission to Teacher Education Program. (Prerequisite to secondary student teaching)

  • Credits: 2
ED 352 Teaching 9-12 Social Studies ED-352
  • This course provides students with an understanding of how the cognitive and affective dimensions of social studies are combined with learning theory and practice for effective teaching at the secondary level. The professional role of the social studies teacher in and out of the classroom is addressed. Prerequisite: admission to Teacher Education Program. (Prerequisite to secondary student teaching)

  • Credits: 2
ED 447 Teaching Elementary Art ED-447
  • This course seeks to develop in the prospective elementary school teacher the fundamental understandings, attitudes and skills needed for the effective teaching of art in the elementary school. (Prerequisites: ART101 Approaching Art and admission to Teacher Education Program.) Enrollment is concurrent with ED371 Teaching Practicum..

  • Credits: 1
ED 446 Teaching Elementary Music ED-446
  • This course presents the principles, objectives and materials of music education in the elementary schools espoused by the leading pedagogical methods. (Prerequisites: minimal competency in music as demonstrated by test, successful completion of Class Piano and/or MUS120 or 121, admission to Teacher Education Program.) Enrollment is concurrent with ED371 Teaching Practicum.

  • Credits: 1
ED 342 Teaching Literacy ED-342
  • The important connection between all the literacy skills: reading, writing, listening, thinking and speaking is addressed. An understanding of a balanced reading approach is emphasized. The approach includes methods of embedding a wide variety of children's literature in the classroom through literature circles, thematic units, reading and writing conferences, reading and writing workshops, process writing and authentic assessment. Teaching strategies for building comprehension, word recognition and word analysis skills are presented as well as appropriate developmental and instructional orientation to spelling, grammar and punctuation. (Prerequisite: admission to Teacher Education Program) Enrollment is concurrent with ED371 Teaching Practicum.

  • Credits: 4
ED 371 Teaching Practicum ED-371
  • This course provides an early field experience for students prior to student teaching. Students are assigned to work with a cooperating teacher at a grade level appropriate to their license. The course is taken concurrently with methods courses to relate theory to practice. Students are usually placed in diverse, urban classrooms. (Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program)

  • Credits: 4
ED 454 Teaching the Faith ED-454
  • Theories of spiritual growth and development of children and adolescents, organization and distinctive characteristics of various religion curricula, theories and methods of effective teaching of the faith and materials for instruction at both elementary and secondary levels are studied. Classroom management and discipline from the Lutheran perspective is also considered. (Prerequisite: ED 336 Educational Psychology, upper level standing.)

  • Credits: 2
ED 439 The Inclusive Classroom ED-439
  • Prospective educators are introduced to legislation and practices related to the inclusion of students with unique learning needs into regular classrooms. Topics include the classroom teacher's role is assessing, developing, and implementing unique learning experiences and managing group and individual behaviors. A 15-hour field experience that satisfies a portion of the university's human relations requirement is included. (Prerequisite: upper level standing)

  • Credits: 2
ED 7054 Written Comps ED-7054
  • This course is designed for the student to demonstrate their writing skills and ability to articulate a comprehensive thought that captures the theoretical constructs presented in the course content.

  • Credits: 0
ED 7061 Written Dissertation Proposal ED-7061
  • This course is designed for the student to develop their presentation of the dissertation proposal to a doctorate committee. This includes the significance of the proposed study, literature review supporting the study, the proposed research design, and time line for completion. Once this is completed and approved the student will move into the status of a doctoral candidate.

  • Credits: 0
EDC 381 Leadership Training Workshop EDC-381
  • This is a training workshop for individuals working in the field of family issues regarding overindulgence with children. Overindulgence is a common family occurrence. In this course, students will explore who overindulges, the painful outcomes, why it is a secret, and how to talk about it. The course includes hands-on strategies about teaching families what to do instead of overindulging. It also includes ways to teach about delayed gratification and what is enough. A broad base of facilitation theories and skills that can be used in any adult education setting will be covered.

  • Credits: 1
EDC 203 Lrng/Understanding the Brain EDC-203
  • The application of brain research to teaching and learning has positive effects for all learners. Additionally, this research has powerful implications when working with children and adults who may not be performing to their potential. Students will investigate brain structure and processing modes. Using a solid foundation of how the brain functions, participants will discuss brain-compatible teaching/learning strategies and effective classroom/workplace applications.

  • Credits: 2
EDL 553 Educ Policy & Admin EDL-553
  • A study of the educational leader's role in the analysis, development, implementation and evaluation of educational policy in contemporary society and schools.

  • Credits: 3
EDL 557 Financial Resources EDL-557
  • A study of leadership and management of the fiscal resources of contemporary schools.

  • Credits: 3
EDL 507 Human Resources and Diversity EDL-507
  • A study of leadership and management for human resources and diversity in the work place in the changing environment of contemporary schools.

  • Credits: 3
EDL 550 Leadership in Education EDL-550
  • A study of the critical role of the educational leader to influence and impact the successful learning of all students.

  • Credits: 3
EDL 552 Mgmt Hum & Fin Resources EDL-552
  • A focus on educational leadership theory and practice related to the management of human and financial resources.

  • Credits: 3
EDL 556 Superv. & Improvmnt of Instruc EDL-556
  • A study of the knowledge and skills of the educational leader to build and implement collaborative teacher supervision procedures which will increase effective instruction and improve student learning.

  • Credits: 3
EDT 320 Action for Qual Child Care EDT-320
  • Participants will explore basic systems thinking in relationship to daily child care program operations. They will develop daily checklists, staff training, and systems for establishing and maintaining quality child care in line with annual inspections. The class will concentrate on best practice policies and maintaining quality child care.

  • Credits: 3
EDT 310 Assess Quality/Chld Care Accrd EDT-310
  • Participants will learn the basic principles of assessing an early childhood and school age care program using materials from national accreditation organizations. Students will complete program observations and improvement action plans based on observations, assessments and surveys.

  • Credits: 3
EDT 240 Creating Onilne Curriculum EDT-240
  • New instructors and trainers who wish to develop courses for academic credit will find different requirements and demands for each accrediting institution. This course offers information on effective syllabus development, student assessment, academic rigor, creating appropriate assignments and assessing quality.

  • Credits: 2
EDT 230 Creating Virtual Educ Material EDT-230
  • This course is designed to facilitate skills in creating supplemental materials for use in the online environment. Participants apply adult learning theory to the development of selected media tools.

  • Credits: 2
EDT 220 Design & Facilitate Online Lrn EDT-220
  • Explore the dynamic environment of online learning. Discuss a range of relevant educational topics that instructors must know in order to Design and deliver effective student centered online learning.

  • Credits: 3
EDT 340 Establish Staff Mentoring EDT-340
  • Participants will explore establishing a mentoring program within military child care and youth programs. Coaching, record keeping systems, mentoring that does not create more labor costs, and getting staff to buy into a mentoring program are concepts that will be covered.

  • Credits: 3
EDT 300 Literacy with Metalinguistics EDT-300
  • Building Literacy with Metalinguistics is a course designed to give reading teachers all the tools necessary to take a non-reader, an at-risk reader, an ESL student or even an accelerated reader to greater literacy. The course focuses on how to explicitly embed essential reading subroutines into the minds and hearts of students at whatever level of literacy they are currently operating. The course concentrates on phonemic awareness, handwriting skills, orthographic analysis, core vocabulary development, and letter recognition processes among others and the skills to deliver them in an integrated, sequential manner.

  • Credits: 3
EDT 600 Literacy with Metalinguistics EDT-600
  • Building Literacy with Metalinguistics is a course designed to give reading teachers all the tools necessary to take a non-reader, an at-risk reader, an ESL student or even an accelerated reader to greater literacy. The course focuses on how to explicitly embed essential reading subroutines into the minds and hearts of students at whatever level of literacy they are currently operating. The course concentrates on phonemic awareness, handwriting skills, orthographic analysis, core vocabulary development, and letter recognition processes among others and the skills to deliver them in an integrated, sequential manner.

  • Credits: 3
EDT 608 Summer Algebra Institute EDT-608
  • This class is for teachers and parents who are interested in practical experience about the use of hand-on materials in the classroom and ways in which the teaching of elementary math that can better prepare students for algebra and higher math.

  • Credits: 2
EDT 270 Tchng a Child w/Disabilities EDT-270
  • This course is a brief overview of special considerations that may impact the learning of a child with a physical and/or cognitive disability. Methods to facilitate learning will be addressed including classroom modifications, parent communication, and possible remediation strategies.

  • Credits: 2
EDT 330 The Business of Child Care EDT-330
  • Students will develop an annual operating budget. In the budget process the class will explore staffing to meet ratios, reading and understanding income statements and variance reports. Students will create a marketing plan to attract new families and establish quality customer service to keep customers. Textbook: The Business of Child Care, Management and Financial Strategies. Handouts will be provided on military financial reports.

  • Credits: 3
EDU 504 Comparative Education Systems EDU-504
  • This course will focus on other cultures and other systems of education in order to discover similarities and differences. Studies will concentrate on educational systems and processes within the U.S. and internationally, in addition to examining U.S. education from a global perspective. The material is focused on developing meaningful terminology and standards for education worldwide and building a framework for assessing the success of educational programs. Students will examine the field of education in the context of economic, political, and social forces as well as work to understand how the development of education in the past has influenced the present.

  • Credits: 3
EGR 200 Introduction to Engineering EGR-200
  • Students will develop skills critical for practicing engineers. The course will focus on disciplinary areas of engineering and engineering design, and will give students extensive exposure to visual, written and oral communication forms, and to computer-based design tools. Students will complete substantial design projects, including prototype construction.

  • Credits: 4
EGR 225 Statics and Dynamics EGR-225
  • This course is an introduction to the subject of Engineering Mechanics. Topics include: Principles of Statics and free body diagrams; Equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies; static analysis of trusses, beams, frames, and machines; Laws of Friction; Area and mass centroids, moments, and products of inertia; Principle of Dynamics, Kinematics; Work; and Energy and Momentum of rigid bodies and systems. (Pre-requisite of C- or higher grade in MAT145 and PHS221)

  • Credits: 4
ENG 385 American Literature I ENG-385
  • Students examine selected works of early American writers with emphasis on Puritanism, literary nationalism, and the period known as the ÀAmerican Renaissance.À Along with examining the literature for aesthetic technique, students discuss significant themes and the literary canon as it relates to minority and women writers. (Prerequisites: ENG120, ENG155)

  • Credits: 4
ENG 386 American Literature II ENG-386
  • Students explore the emergence of local color, realism and naturalism and the fragmentation of modern and post-modern literature between the Civil War and the present. Women and minority writers are important foci. (Prerequisites: ENG120, ENG155)

  • Credits: 4
ENG 220 Applied Grammar ENG-220
  • To communicate clearly, students must correctly apply the rules that govern the English language. Through reading, discussion, and constant practice, students in this course will examine and use these rules to further develop their writing skills.

  • Credits: 2
ENG 365 British Literature I ENG-365
  • The beginning course in the survey of British literature covers the Anglo-Saxon period through the middle of the eighteenth century. Selected readings lead to discussions about the growth of nationalism and its reflection in literary pride and canon formation. (Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ENG120 and ENG155)

  • Credits: 4
ENG 366 British Literature II ENG-366
  • The survey of British literature continues with selected writings from the Romantic period through to the present day. Readings cover the rise of the novel, the fight for women's rights and the decline of colonialism. (Prerequisites: ENG120, ENG155)

  • Credits: 4
ENG 120 College Writing ENG-120
  • The content of a writing course is writing. For students to become proficient writers in all disciplines, they need to learn how to read and analyze a variety of texts and then practice reading and analyzing texts from various disciplines. Through research and writing, students learn what others are saying and how to integrate those ideas into their own writing. Constant practice will guide students into developing their own voice and style. They will make conscious choices related to audience and academic conventions.

  • Credits: 4
ENG 227 Column Writing ENG-227
  • This course will introduce students to the role of columns as vehicles that affect both public opinion and the identities of periodicals. Study of a range of contemporary artifacts will provide a basis for understanding the balance of opinion and reporting in column writing. Students will both analyze and write columns.

  • Credits: 2
ENG 325 Creative Writing ENG-325
  • This course will examine the basic elements of short fiction and poetry and will require students to experiment with both genres. The class is run as a workshop: the main focus will be on the discussion of each other's work. It is also, to a certain extent, a literature course, since what one reads strongly influences what one writes. Assigned readings are intended to give students a fuller understanding of technique as well as a range of artistic possibilities. (Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ENG120 and ENG155)

  • Credits: 4
ENG 425 Creative Writing II ENG-425
  • This is an advanced course that requires students to probe more deeply into the elements of short fiction, poetry and creative non-fiction. In addition to producing original creative work, students will read a variety of literary texts and selected works on the craft of creative writing. This class will be run as a workshop. (Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ENG120, ENG155 and ENG325)

  • Credits: 4
ENG 262 Creative Wrtg:Non-fic Humor ENG-262
  • Students will study the humorous essay by reading and listening to contemporary essays primarily by David Sedaris. They will learn how to discern and apply conventions and techniques in a workshop setting. Students will attend a performance by David Sedaris at the Orpheum Theater in Minneapolis.

  • Credits: 2
ENG 105 Developing Writing Skills ENG-105
  • This course is designed to develop confidence and enhance writing skills through examining the learnerÕs writing journey, while addressing common writing problems such as word choice, sentence structure, and paragraphing. Learners will understand the course material through readings, exercises, and proofread their own work.

  • Credits: 2
ENG 488 English Independent Study ENG-488
  • Independent study offers the opportunity to pursue advanced study in language, literature, or communication. Independent study is open only to students with substantial preparatory course work in the discipline involved.

  • Credits: 0
ENG 499 Framing the Literary Tradition ENG-499
  • This course, taught by all full-time English faculty, for English majors and teacher candidates in language arts, is designed to help the major see patterns in course work. Through review, reading and discussion students will re-examine and synthesize texts and ideas. The English Capstone exam is both written and oral. (Prerequisite: senior year status)

  • Credits: 1
ENG 112 Fundamentals of Writing, ESL ENG-112
  • This course, an English for Speakers of Other Languages course, is designed for students whose writing indicates a need to study writing mechanics, grammar and other sentence-level or paragraph-level aspects of writing. This may be an elective but it is required for students whose high school grades, test scores and/or writing sample indicate a need for such study.

  • Credits: 4
ENG 102 Fundmntls of Reading & Writing ENG-102
  • This course will concentrate on providing foundational reading and writing skills needed to function successfully in U.S. university courses. The content will focus on sentence-level English language proficiency, as well as practical vocabulary, basic language structures, and academic writing. All coursework is based on an integrated skills approach with speaking, reading, writing, and grammar components. Students will read a variety of sources, including fiction and nonfiction texts and articles, while preparing for university academic expectations by exploring different styles of academic writing.

  • Credits: 3
ENG 338 Hist & Prin of English Lang ENG-338
  • This course provides an introduction to the linguistic study of the English language, focusing in particular on English phonology, morphology and syntax. Also covered in the course will be the development of the English language over time and the relationship between language and society, including literature, dialects and registers of various English speakers and writers.

  • Credits: 2
ENG 498 Internship ENG-498
  • Students participate in a variety of internship programs in editing, publishing, broadcasting, television and public information under the supervision of the faculty and the director of internships for the company or organization granting the internship. (Prerequisites: ENG120, ENG155)

  • Credits: 0
ENG 100 Intro to College Writing ENG-100
  • This course is designed for students who need writing instruction and practice before enrolling in ENG120 College Writing. Focusing on correct and clear sentence construction, organized and developed paragraphs, and significant grammar problems, ENG100 mixes short writing assignments, class discussion, and individual conferences. Students may be required to take ENG100 based on their English ACT or their verbal SAT scores. Students who wish to review writing basics may elect, at any point in their college careers, to enroll in ENG100.

  • Credits: 4
ENG 155 Introduction to Literature ENG-155
  • Introduction to Literature seeks to excite students about literature; to feed students passion about literature; and to enhance their pleasure from literature. Through a variety of texts, students will encounter other members of the human community and, while in their company, learn about themselves. The course will introduce basic literary terminology.

  • Credits: 4
ENG 335 Jane Austen & Her Descendants ENG-335
  • Jane Austen, an English writer who lived from 1775 to 1817, is enjoying renewed popularity in the late 20th-early 21st century .Within the last decade or so, Jane Austen's 18th century novels have inspired a flurry of attention in popular culture, including star-studded film versions of Pride and Prejudice, Emma, and Sense and Sensibility, we will also look at movies and books which reinterpret her texts from a contemporary perspective. This two-credit course will focus on Austen's most popular novel, Pride and Prejudice, the story of five unmarried sisters looking for love and marriage. We will then explore Helen Fielding's 1997 novel Bridget Jones' Diary, a modern re-writing of Pride and Prejudice, as well as the movie versions of both novels. In addition to reading the two novels and viewing the two films, you will be expected to write two papers for this course..

  • Credits: 2
ENG 221 Journalism ENG-221
  • This course is an introduction to periodical journalism. It focuses on the contemporary practices, issues, and ethics of the profession. Students will practice extensive in-the field reporting and journalistic writing. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in ENG120)

  • Credits: 4
ENG 222 Journalism Practicum ENG-222
  • Journalism II provides an opportunity for hands-on experience in all aspects of producing a newspaper: writing, editing, layout, photography, business management, etc. This course is strongly suggested for those who wish to contribute to The Sword (the Concordia student newspaper) on a regular basis. It is required for the Editor-in-Chief, Technical Editor(s), and Page Editors. Beginning writers and photographers are encouraged to sign up. This workshop style class meets one hour a week, usually in the evenings.

  • Credits: 1
ENG 440 Literary Theory ENG-440
  • In this course students become familiar with various critical theories about literature including structuralism, deconstruction, cultural criticism (especially as related to third world literature), feminist theory and psychoanalytical theory. It prepares them to read critically and helps them to develop their own critical stances. (Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ENG120 and ENG155, and an upper level English course)

  • Credits: 4
ENG 420 Persuasive Wrtng on Cont. Issu ENG-420
  • Students in this course analyze essays by established writers of expository prose, read articles in current magazines and journals and meet with local writers invited into the classroom. Students also write their own creative non-fiction and keep journals. Both in workshops and in individual conferences, the course asks students to consider their own writing as a process that requires their attention to revising and editing. (Prerequisites: ENG120, ENG155)

  • Credits: 4
ENG 228 Review Writing ENG-228
  • This course will introduce students to the various roles of the review in our culture. Study of contemporary artifacts will provide a basis for understanding the balance of presentation, critique, and edification in reviewing. Students will both analyze and write reviews.

  • Credits: 2
ENG 490 Seminar in Literature ENG-490
  • Seminars in literature cover varying topics in greater depth than is possible in a survey class. Recent seminar topics include Virginia Woolf: Her Art and Her Influence; Emily Dickinson: Her Circle and Her Influence; Seminar in the African-American Literary Tradition; and Victorian Secrets. (Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ENG120 and ENG155)

  • Credits: 4
ENG 369 Shakespeare ENG-369
  • This course offers a study of Shakespeare's work and its relationship to Elizabethan concepts of poetry and rhetoric as well as to gender and imperialism and government. It explores the rich terrain of Shakespeare imaginative world. (Prerequisites: ENG120, ENG155)

  • Credits: 4
ENG 324 Teaching Writing 1:1 ENG-324
  • Often, the best way to learn something is to teach it to someone else. Students in this course will do just that: improve their own writing, editing, and tutoring skills while helping others express their ideas in writing, develop their own writing voice, and edit their own work. Students will apply what they learn from readings, discussions, and writing assignments by tutoring in the Writing Center each week. (Prerequisite: ENG120)

  • Credits: 2
ENG 487 Topics in Literature ENG-487
  • Topics in Literature offers students an opportunity to study in-depth a literary genre, theme, or movement. Topics will vary from offering to offering. (Prerequisite: ENG155 or permission of the instructor)

  • Credits: 2
ENG 326 Topics in Writing ENG-326
  • This course, the topic of which may vary from year to year, is designed to provide intermediate writers with the opportunity to experiment with different styles and genres.

  • Credits: 2
ENG 375 World Lit I: West Classical ENG-375
  • This course examines major authors in the Western literary tradition from the ancient Greeks and Romans through the Middle Ages. Authors include Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Virgil and Dante. This course may offer additional material from other early cultures. (Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ENG120 and ENG155)

  • Credits: 4
ENG 376 World Literature II ENG-376
  • Using examples of literature in translation from Asia, South America, Africa, the Caribbean, and Europe, the course will explore themes common around the world in forms distinctive to diverse cultures. (Prerequisites: ENG120, ENG155)

  • Credits: 4
ENG 123 Writing for the Workplace ENG-123
  • This course provides students the opportunity to focus on the elements of strong writing with an emphasis on writing within the professional setting. Students will study the writing process, the role of audience, and the importance of considering context when approaching writing tasks. Students will also review the basics of correct grammar and usage and apply guidelines for composing clear, concise, effective prose to several types of professional documents.

  • Credits: 2
ENG 320 Writing in the Workplace ENG-320
  • Students in this course will examine the conventions of writing in the workplace. The particular topics of the course will vary depending on the semester. Some of the topics covered might include grant writing, copyrighting, writing for the web, public relations writing, or technical writing. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in ENG120)

  • Credits: 2
ENG 330 Young Adult Literature ENG-330
  • By introducing the student to a wide variety of both traditional and recent literature for young adults, this course helps the student become aware of quality adolescent literature. It includes instruction in oral interpretation of the literature, methods of presenting it in the classroom and planning individualized reading programs for young people of high school age. (Prerequisites: ENG120, ENG155)

  • Credits: 2
ENV 498 Environmental Sci. Internship ENV-498
  • This internship is designed to provide students with a work/educational experience which will help them determine their future educational and occupational goals.

  • Credits: 1
ENV 120 Intro to Environmental Science ENV-120
  • This course is designed to introduce students to environmental science. Course topics will include factors influencing the quality of the environment, ecological principles and relationships, and their relationship to population growth, pollution, resource allocation and depletion, conservation, and technology. The course will make use of the Concordia University Natural Science Research Station as an outdoor laboratory.

  • Credits: 0
ESC 160 Earth Science ESC-160
  • This introductory course covers the areas of geology, meteorology and astronomy. Knowledge is gained from the text, supplementary sources, class sessions, field work and by use of geology, meteorology and astronomy equipment. A great variety of supplementary aids, including the use of web sites, enhance the course. Three lectures and one two hour laboratory per week.

  • Credits: 4
ESC 140 Observational Astronomy ESC-140
  • The course emphasizes the observational nature of astronomy. Observations are made of the moon, sun, stars and planets. Observations are made using star charts, computer programs, telescopes, 35 mm cameras and digital cameras. The course considers historical and modern astronomy, with special emphasis on the use of the Internet and current astronomy literature. Observations result in information on the location, motion and features of each of these objects.

  • Credits: 0
ESC 120 Observational Geology ESC-120
  • This course emphasizes the observational nature of geology. Observations are made of sites near campus and sites more distant from campus. Observations are made of Minnesota's rocks and minerals and evidence of water, glacial, volcanic and earthquake activity in Minnesota's history. The course considers terms and concepts of geology, with special emphasis on use of the Internet and current geology literature. Observations result in being able to discover the history of each Minnesota site.

  • Credits: 0
ET 505 Exploring Classroom Tech Tools ET-505
  • An examination of how to best enhance student achievement through effective incorporation of various software and hardware.

  • Credits: 3
ET 520 Field Experience: Course Devlp ET-520
  • Demonstrate application of skills and knowledge required to support technology design and implementation in an educational setting.

  • Credits: 3
ET 515 Prof Dev & Ldrshp in Ed Tech ET-515
  • A focus on leadership and professional development in planning and integrating educational technology.

  • Credits: 3
ET 500 Technology Trends & Soc Media ET-500
  • A survey of the historical and theoretical development of educational technology and an examination of future trends in K-12 education.

  • Credits: 3
ET 510 Virtual Classroom ET-510
  • The study of various social media modes to engage the learner and enhance instruction.

  • Credits: 3

F

FAS 220 Adolescent Development FAS-220
  • This course examines developmental characteristics of adolescence from a family systems perspective; covering physiological, emotional, cognitive, parent-child, social, vocational and religious dimensions with application to family life education and ministry.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 448 Development in Adulthood FAS-448
  • This course familiarizes the student with adult developmental and gerontological theory. Attention will focus on the physical, emotional, cognitive, social, moral, sexual and spiritual development of the adult. Developmental concepts across the life span related to family life education will be emphasized.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 533 Fam Stds & Fam life Educator FAS-533
  • This course familiarizes the student with the study of various family problems, stressors, and changes prevalent in today's society. Selected family issues are examined in light of the family life educator's role. Included in the discussion are the current issues affecting the nature of the profession, the family life education professional, various roles of the family life educator, and various theoretical stances that inform the family life educator's work with family problems and stressors? Students will develop specific sources focused on a specific topic of interest and a critical review paper outlining a current issues impact on the family.

  • Credits: 2
FAS 506 Families In Society FAS-506
  • This course familiarizes the student with an understanding of the history, evolution and demographics of the family. Kinship, family structures, functions and roles are explored. Particular emphasis will be placed on the family's relationship to other systems and institutions in the society.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 451 Family Comm & Relationships FAS-451
  • This course familiarizes the student with an understanding of the psychological, spiritual and social aspects of developing and maintaining healthy interpersonal relationships. An emphasis will be placed on the physiological, psychological, social and sexual development of relationships across the life span.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 530 Family Comm/Relationships FAS-530
  • This course familiarizes the student with an understanding of the psychological, spiritual, and social aspects of developing and maintaining healthy interpersonal relationships. An emphasis will be placed on the physiological, psychological, social, and sexual development of relationships across the life span.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 442 Family Decision FAS-442
  • This course familiarizes the student with an understanding of the decisions individuals make about developing and allocating resources to meet their goals. The focus of the course is on internal dynamics of family decision-making processes and on the goal-directed behaviors of families in improving their quality of life.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 540 Family Decision Making FAS-540
  • This course familiarizes the student with an understanding of the decisions individuals make about developing and allocating resources to meet their goals. The focus of the course is on internal dynamics of family decision-making processes and on the goal-directed behaviors of families in improving their quality of life. Topics include: decision-making, valuing, planning, communication, and organization skills for resource use.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 444 Family Law Public Policy FAS-444
  • This course explores historical development of laws and public policy affecting families. Ethics and ethical implications of social change will be explored. Students will understand the legal definition of the family and laws that affect the status of the family. The course will focus on the role of the family life educator as an advocate for the well being of the family. The formation of social values, respect for the diversity of values, and the social consequences of value choices are discussed within a family life education framework.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 498 Family Life Educ. Internship FAS-498
  • The internship provides the student with an in-depth field experience in a work setting that provides family life education services. The student learns to apply family life education theories and principles. The student in conjunction with the academic advisor selects an appropriate internship site which meets the needs and vocational interests of the student. (Prerequisite: Completion of a minimum of 30 credits in the Family Life Education Major)

  • Credits: 0
FAS 400 Family Systems FAS-400
  • This course is an analysis of the family. It investigates the family as a system of relationships which interacts across the family life cycle. It includes a survey of current developments in the study of the family and an analysis of changes in American society and their influence on family life. Also included is a focus on marriage and family therapy from a systems framework.

  • Credits: 4
FAS 401 Family Systems FAS-401
  • This course is an analysis of the family. It investigates the family as a system of relationships which interacts across the family life cycle. It includes a survey of current developments in the study of the family and an analysis of changes in American society and their influence on family life. Also included is a focus on marriage and family therapy from a systems framework.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 501 Family Systems FAS-501
  • This course is an analysis of the family. It investigates the family as a system of relationships which interacts across the family life cycle. It includes a survey of current developments in the study of the family and an analysis of changes in American society and their influence on family life. Also included is a focus on marriage and family therapy from a systems framework.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 447 Growth & Dev in Children FAS-447
  • This course will familiarize the student with child and adolescent developmental theories. Attention will focus on the physical, emotional, cognitive, social, moral, sexual and spiritual development of the child and adolescent. Application of developmental concepts to family life education will be emphasized. The course will emphasize the child's position in the family life cycle.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 453 Intimate Relationships FAS-453
  • This course examines the intimacy of human sexuality and relationships. Specific attention will focus on the emotional and psychological aspects of sexual involvement, sexual values and decision-making, the physiological and psychological components of the sexual response, and the influence of sexual involvement on interpersonal relationships.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 560 Intimate Relationships FAS-560
  • The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with the emotional and psychological aspects of intimate relationships. Topics include: dating and courtship; love and romance; and sexual behavior, values and decision-making. An emphasis will be on sexuality and intimacy in interpersonal relationships across the lifespan.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 200 Intro to Family Life Ed FAS-200
  • This course is an introduction to the field of family life education. Students will explore primary theoretical principles using the Life Span Family Life Education framework and professional issues influencing the practice of family life education. Emphasizing key content areas, the students will be introduced to: content area definitions and objectives; examples highlighting the integration of theory and practice in family life education; key resources; and future Issues and challenges for family life educators.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 101 Intro to Family Life Education FAS-101
  • This course is an introduction to the field of family life education. Students will explore primary theoretical principles using the Life Span Family Life Education framework and professional issues influencing the practice of family life education. Emphasizing key content areas, the students will be introduced to: content area definitions and objectives; examples highlighting the integration of theory and practice in family life education; key resources; and future issues and challenges for family life educators.

  • Credits: 1
FAS 300 Meth & Material for Family Ed FAS-300
  • This course provides students with the knowledge, skills and attitudes needed for effective teaching of family life/parent education curriculum in a variety of family/parent education settings. Students will analyze educational materials for parent education, will observe/analyze a parent educator in the field and co-facilitate a parenting session in class. These analyses will be based on adult education principles.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 446 Methodology in Fam Life Ed FAS-446
  • This course provides the student with a conceptual framework for programming family life education. Students will apply the methodology of adult learning to the broad principles of family life education. Attention is directed at developing the ability to plan, implement, and evaluate family life education programming. Through the lens of reflective practice, an emphasis is placed on educational methodology and leadership. In addition, networking with community agencies and the resources and challenges of technology in delivering family life education is explored.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 576 Methods in Programming FAS-576
  • This course provides a pedagogical framework for planning, implementation, and evaluation of programming for parent and family education.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 532 Navigating Oceans of Data FAS-532
  • The course is designed to introduce the scope and function of information and the research process in family studies. The course will introduce students to types and fundamental concepts and process in the research literature. Problem solving is viewed as one of the primary functions of the research literature information, leading to strategies and action for solutions and change. Students will gain experience developing a framework for consuming the research literature and information in family studies.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 440 Overview of Contemp Families FAS-440
  • This overview course is intended to provide the student with an understanding of families and their relationships to other institutions and an introduction to the family as a dynamic system. Specific attention will be given to family forms and composition; ethnicity and cultural variations; dating, courtship, and marital choice; gender roles; demographic trends among families; institutional effects on families and vice versa; and family structures and functions.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 480 Parent Coaching 1: Thry/Prac FAS-480
  • Students will study a variety of techniques that are unique in coaching parents. Attention will be directed at developing the studentÕs ability to evaluate and implement family life education knowledge while understanding the uniqueness of each individual family. It is bringing the student from theory to creating a solid and professional foundation for Parent Coaching.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 680 Parent Coaching 1: Thry/Prac FAS-680
  • Students will study a variety of techniques that are unique in coaching parents. Attention will be directed at developing the studentÕs ability to evaluate and implement family life education knowledge while understanding the uniqueness of each individual family. It is bringing the student from theory to creating a solid and professional foundation for Parent Coaching.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 481 Parent Coaching 2: FAS-481
  • Students will broaden their knowledge of the field of parent coaching and sharpen their mindful parenting skills. It includes skills for coaching a variety of parenting challenges, behaviors, problems, concerns, issues, and special needs. Also included is a focus on couple relationships and recognizing spiritual needs.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 681 Parent Coaching 2: FAS-681
  • Students will broaden their knowledge of the field of parent coaching and sharpen their mindful parenting skills. It includes skills for coaching a variety of parenting challenges, behaviors, problems, concerns, issues, and special needs. Also included is a focus on couple relationships and recognizing spiritual needs.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 482 Parent Coaching 3: Prof Appl FAS-482
  • Students will apply the techniques and skills that they have learned with actual clients. The professors and cohort members will offer ideas and support to better their coaching sessions. The class contains details for your Parenting Consultant Business as well as gaining Parent Coaching skills. As a result of this class, you will feel like a confident Parent Coach.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 682 Parent Coaching 3: Prof Appl FAS-682
  • Students will apply the techniques and skills that they have learned with actual clients. The professors and cohort members will offer ideas and support to better their coaching sessions. The class contains details for your Parenting Consultant Business as well as gaining Parent Coaching skills. As a result of this class, you will feel like a confident Parent Coach.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 683 Parent Coaching 4: Supervised FAS-683
  • There is a required Fourth Class in the Parent Coaching certificate which offers supervision from a certified parent coach. This includes new tools, support, new perspectives, problem solving while being sensitive to the new coachÕs learning and coaching style. It opens up a new area of confidence for the coach. This class will be available when the student begins their coaching.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 483 Parent Coaching 4: Supervised FAS-483
  • There is a required Fourth Class in the Parent Coaching certificate which offers supervision from a certified parent coach. This includes new tools, support, new perspectives, problem solving while being sensitive to the new coachÕs learning and coaching style. It opens up a new area of confidence for the coach. This class will be available when the student begins their coaching.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 443 Parent Education FAS-443
  • This course explores how parents teach, guide, and influence their children and adolescents. The course will emphasize parenting as a process, a responsibility and a role that changes across the life span. Variations in parenting practices will be discussed in the context of building on strengths, empowering parents, and remaining sensitive to individual and community needs.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 570 Parent Education FAS-570
  • This course explores how parents teach, guide, and influence their children and adolescents. The course will emphasize parenting as a process, a responsibility, and a role that changes across the life span. Variations in parenting practices will be discussed in the context of building on strengths; empowering parents, and remaining sensitive to individual and community needs.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 225 Parenting Across Cultures FAS-225
  • This course is designed to explore different ways of parenting across cultures with a focus on infants and very young children. We will examine feeding, sleeping and basic parenting practices and will view parenting through a sociocultural lens.

  • Credits: 2
FAS 490 Portfolio and Synthesis FAS-490
  • The final course is designed to help learners reflect on all they have done in the program. Through guest speakers, research study and reflection on practice, students will synthesize all they have learned. Preparation of a professional portfolio will cap the learning experience.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 491 Portfolio and Synthesis FAS-491
  • This final course is designed to help learners reflect on all they have done in the BA program. Through discussion questions and review of past coursework, students will synthesize all they have learned. Preparation of a professional portfolio will cap the learning experience.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 525 Public Policy/Applied Ethics FAS-525
  • This course explores historical development of laws and public policy affecting families. Ethics and ethical implications of social change will be explored. Students will understand the legal definition of the family and laws that affect the status of the family. The course will focus on the role of the family life educator as an advocate for the well-being of the family. The formation of social values, respect for the diversity of values, and the social consequences of value choices are discussed within a family life education framework.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 534 Reflexive Assessment & Eval FAS-534
  • This course reviews the connection between research methods and the research question or problem. Students will explore the role of assessment and evaluation in early childhood education. Various forms of assessment will be considered with an emphasis on the recursive nature of assessment. Students will experience the process of establishing strategy for a program in early childhood education.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 551 Seminar in Human Growth FAS-551
  • This course includes a study of human growth and development throughout the life cycle. Consideration of physical, emotional, cognitive, social, moral, sexual, spiritual and personality development is included.

  • Credits: 3
FAS 504 Systemic Dynamics FAS-504
  • This course is designed to provide an understanding of family strengths and weaknesses in light of internal dynamics of the family. Students will explore the family as a system of relationships extending across the family life cycle. The course includes a survey of current developments in the study of family and analysis of changes in American society and their influences on family life. Emphasis is placed on using family systems processes to examine and understand the internal dynamics of the family that lead to effective family life education program planning, implementation, and assessment.

  • Credits: 3
FIN 301 Corporate Finance I FIN-301
  • This course explores the basics of financial management. Topics include the capital markets, the cash budget, pro forma statements, analysis of financial statements, and the time value of money Students also complete a research project. (Prerequisites: ACC201, MAT110 , MAT125 or MAT135)

  • Credits: 4
FIN 311 Corporate Finance II FIN-311
  • This course continues the examination of various corporate finance topics from Corporate Finance I. Special focus is given to long-term financing, including bonds, preferred stock, common stock and the optimal capital structure. Students also explore capital budgeting and the cost of capital and dividend policy. (Prerequisite: FIN301)

  • Credits: 4
FIN 420 Fin Dvlp, Fundrsng, Grant Writ FIN-420
  • Students learn the theory and practice of philanthropy, fundraising and grant writing for non-profit organizations. This course provides hands-on instruction for identifying grant opportunities, writing proposals, and evaluating proposals for non-profits. Students also learn to develop budgets and manage resource acquisition through ethical fund-raising and the development of philanthropy partners.

  • Credits: 4
FIN 411 Investments & Capital Markets FIN-411
  • This course explores investment decision-making in a capitalist economy. The operation of securities markets, business cycles and fiscal and monetary policy are analyzed. Various investment methodologies are discussed. International investing, valuation of stocks and bonds and a survey of the various types of investment assets are also included. Students prepare an investment portfolio as their final project. (Prerequisite: FIN301)

  • Credits: 4
FIN 211 Personal Finance FIN-211
  • This course presents an overview of the financial planning process for individuals. The focus is on the decision-making tools and applications of financial planning. Students will build their own financial plan that will guide their financial decisions in the present and in the future.

  • Credits: 2
FMH 585 Cultural Aspects Frn Mntl Hlth FMH-585
  • This course explores what corrections, law enforcement, legal, and related forensics-based professionals need to know about culture. Students can expect to understand the complex definition of culture and gain insight into how culture may impact oneÕs personal and professional choices and behaviors.

  • Credits: 3
FMH 530 Ethical & Legal Considerations FMH-530
  • This course focuses on the ethical and legal considerations that forensic professionals encounter in their daily job duties. Students will learn about ethical guidelines for forensic practice, as they relate to an ethical decision-making framework.

  • Credits: 3
FMH 510 Family Violence, PTSD & Trauma FMH-510
  • This course provides an in-depth look at the relationship between family violence, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), preventing suicide, substance abuse, and trauma, as these topics relate to the family structure. This course will help students understand the dynamics of family violence and trauma on other family members, including children.

  • Credits: 3
FMH 500 Forensic Mental Health FMH-500
  • This course provides students with a comprehensive overview of the forensic mental health field. The course explores in detail why some people with mental-health related problems engage in criminal related behavior.

  • Credits: 3
FMH 590 Forensic Mental Health Law FMH-590
  • This course examines the relationship between mental illness and the legal system. It will discuss the various professional roles involved in the forensic mental health law arena, issues involving competency to proceed, expert witness testimony, courtroom testimony protocols, and the insanity defense.

  • Credits: 3
FMH 580 Forensic Risk Assessment FMH-580
  • This course provides more extensive training to students on forensic mental health assessment for adults and adolescents. It will cover topics including risk-needs assessment tools that are commonly used by forensic mental health professionals to assess for risk of violence, danger, and harm to self and others, as well as determining what criminogenic needs should be addressed.

  • Credits: 3
FMH 540 Fornsc Mentl Hlth Psychopathol FMH-540
  • This course examines the most common mental health conditions observed in a forensic mental health-based population, including those conditions common among homeless individuals with undiagnosed mental health issues. Students can expect to learn how substance use, co-occurring disorders, traumatic brain injuries, and pre-natal substance exposure can contribute to increased mental health symptoms.

  • Credits: 3
FMH 595 Research and Capstone FMH-595
  • This course is the culminating final project in this program of study. Students are required to complete a 30-40 page integrative paper on a scholarly topic relevant to the study of forensic mental health.

  • Credits: 3
FMH 520 Research Methods in FMH FMH-520
  • This course provides students with the skills to critically evaluate research on issues related to forensic mental health. Students will learn how to apply empirical research to inform their decision-making in matters of forensic assessment and treatment planning.

  • Credits: 3
FMH 570 Sexual Offending FMH-570
  • This course provides students with a better understanding regarding why some individuals engage in inappropriate sexual behaviors. Students will learn about the various types of sex offenders, risk factors and statistics associated with sex offending, sex offender-specific policies (i.e., registries, civil commitment of SVPÕs), and sex offender treatment options.

  • Credits: 3
FMH 550 Spec. Populations Frn Mntl Hlt FMH-550
  • This course explores underserved and disadvantaged individuals who are involved in the criminal justice and legal system.

  • Credits: 3
FMH 560 Substance Use & Co-Oc Disordrs FMH-560
  • This course provides students with an overview of the most commonly abused substances in forensic mental health populations. Students will learn how to identify commonly abused drugs, recognize patterns and warning signs associated with drug use, and identify evidence-based intervention and treatment approaches.

  • Credits: 3
FNA 225 Art in Soc & Pol Contexts FNA-225
  • This course of study is designed to examine the role of the arts within the context of social, religious, and political evolution. Topics of study will include the arts as a catalyst for social change, propaganda, and contemporary cultural issues.

  • Credits: 1
FNA 228 Arts in the City FNA-228
  • Through course curriculum and experience students will be introduced to the vast body of artistic expression, analyze and discuss the role of culture, in its many formsÑas it is constructed and/or represented by the arts. With blended class delivery students will explore the various genres of artistic expression, recognize commonalities within the fine arts, and integrate personal experiences into oneÕs understanding of the arts. Students will spend one weekend of this course visiting local art museums and attending musical and theatrical events in the Minneapolis/St Paul area. Students must be available to attend all organized functions on that weekend.

  • Credits: 4
FNA 105 History of Broadway Musical 1 FNA-105
  • This course provides an early overview of American musical theater, popularly known as Broadway from its European roots and examines the place of musical theater in American popular culture.

  • Credits: 2
FNA 110 History of Broadway Musical II FNA-110
  • This course provides an overview of American musical theater, popularly known as Broadway, beginning in 1940 through the present will be examined with respect to the place of musical theater in American popular culture.

  • Credits: 2
FNA 221 Integrative Concepts Fine Arts FNA-221
  • This course of study is designed to examine the arts and to explore how humankind attempts to understand itself and find its place in the universe through the arts.

  • Credits: 1
FNA 200 Introduction to Cinema FNA-200
  • This course investigates the creative processes embedded in the art of cinema. Emphasis will be on the artistic, entertainment, and business aspects that interact to inform our shared cultural experience. Learners will be challenged to examine and explore film as an art form via simple analysis techniques, readings, and reflections. The focus will be on the creators of moving images as well as the role of the audience in creating meaning.

  • Credits: 4
FNA 210 Jazz in the City FNA-210
  • Through lecture, listening, and discussion students will learn the history of jazz Ñan indigenous American art formÑ and discover the cultural place that this music has had in the past, and today, and its relationship to other popular music.

  • Credits: 3
FNA 250 Mary Cassatt: American Imp FNA-250
  • This course examines the art and life of Mary Cassatt, often called ÒAmericaÕs greatest female artist.Ó Living in Paris at the height of the Impressionist movement, she was accepted as the only American within the major circle of the Impressionists and exhibited her work with them on several occasions. Cassatt, living independently abroad when the age called for women to exist absolutely in the private sphere of ÒHome and Hearth,Ó placed herself on the margins of culture. Students will be challenged to contemplate the importance of works not only on technical merit, but also within the context of the society and age in which they were created.

  • Credits: 2
FNA 227 Music and Community FNA-227
  • Explore music in a new way! Art is a means of communication, and in this course we will examine a wide variety of music in the context of human experience. Topics may include ÒMusic and Love,Ó ÒMusic and Nature,Ó ÒMusic and Society,Ó ÒMusic and Myth,Ó etc. Musical genres to be considered include examples from Broadway, popular music, and music of western and non-western cultures.

  • Credits: 2
FNA 120 Music Appreciation FNA-120
  • This course explores the relationship between commonly held experiences and the expressive voice of the creative musical artist and will place music in the social/historical context which shapes the expressive spirit.

  • Credits: 2
FNA 222 Music as Form & Expression FNA-222
  • This course explores music as an expression of human experience. Students will identify basic elements of musical composition and will consider the importance of music within community. Students have the option of attending a concert as part of the final assignment.

  • Credits: 1
FNA 281 Music in Cinema FNA-281
  • The union of music and cinema dates to the beginnings of moving pictures in the 1890s. In this course, students will be introduced to the history and aesthetics of the music-cinema relationship. A prior knowledge of music and/or film history is not required. Students will be taught skills enabling them to listen intelligently and write cogently on music and cinema.

  • Credits: 2
FNA 214 Survey of World Music FNA-214
  • This course will explore the vast body of music from around the globe. Through lectures, discussions, group work, WEBCT, assigned listening, and live performances our attention will be focused on how selected regional musical genres and instruments serve to construct and dictate issues such as race identity, gender identity, community, heritage, and other social formations. Considering the United StatesÀ position as a dominating cultural force globally, this course will also explore the influence and intersections it has with the music of the non-western world.

  • Credits: 3
FNA 209 Theater in the City FNA-209
  • Through a blended delivery of online and in-class course curriculum as well as performance attendance, students will learn about theatric themes, character and plot development, what the local theater community has to offer, and how all the different offerings fit into the marketplace of the arts. Students will spend one weekend of this course visiting local theatrical performances in the Minneapolis/St Paul area. Students must be available to attend all organized functions on that weekend.

  • Credits: 3
FNA 255 Topics in British Humor FNA-255
  • An investigation of British Theatric and Cinematic humor, romping through such models as Absolutely Fabulous, Mr. Bean, Benny Hill, Austen Powers, Fawlty Towers, and, of course, Monty Python. The culminating experience will be attending the live performance of SpamaLot.

  • Credits: 2
FNA 280 Topics in Cinema: FNA-280
  • This class is an exploration of selected films by Alfred Hitchcock that illuminates postwar American cinema, the role of the spectator, and the art film criticism. Students discover the importance of HitchcockÕs contribution to cinema through a close reading of specific cinematic texts, and learn how the master of suspense created his trademark style.

  • Credits: 2
FNA 290 Topics in Cinema: FNA-290
  • This course is an exploration of selected films by the American filmmaker Steven Spielberg. Through class chats, discussions, and written assignments, learners investigate the aesthetic, cultural, and economic impact of one of the most popular and successful motion-picture directors of the last three decades. In addition, the course examines the style and themes in SpielbergÕs films, as well as his influence as a producer and studio executive.

  • Credits: 2
FPA 112 The Human Odyssey FPA-112
  • The Human Odyssey will explore the fine arts by way of themes found in Homer's Odyssey. Areas explored will include home, journey, identity, hospitality, and the nature of the arts. (Offered odd springs.)

  • Credits: 4
FRM 445 Applied Food Retail Economics FRM-445
  • This course will examine the framework and systems of current accounting and finance principles specific to the food retail industry including gross profit margins, demand, forecasting, pricing, cost analysis, sourcing and promotional activities. Students will apply these principles, along with ethical responsibility and critical thinking skills, to management practices of business decision making. Students will prepare a final project on a relevant business application that demonstrates the principles learned within the readings and cases from this course.

  • Credits: 3
FRM 360 Applied Food Retail Finance FRM-360
  • This course will examine the framework and systems of current accounting and finance principles specific to the food retail industry including gross profit margins, demand, forecasting, pricing, cost analysis, sourcing and promotional activities. Students will apply these principles, along with ethical responsibility and critical thinking skills, to management practices of business decision making. In the final project the students will evaluate an ethical accounting case study and determine how the issues could have been averted in the analysis.

  • Credits: 4
FRM 450 Business Plan Project FRM-450
  • The Business Planning course is a process in which students summarize, synthesize, and demonstrate knowledge, skills, and competencies as organizational managers and leaders. The students will draw on their FRMMM course work, career experiences, and critical thinking activities. This course is presented as an independent study where students create their own business plan for a particular area within FRMMM industry approved by their academic and industry advisor. Outcomes will demonstrate consumer insight, research skills, and experienced-based learning to complete a written plan and presentation.

  • Credits: 3
FRM 480 Business Planning Project FRM-480
  • The Business planning course provides a foundation for students to summarize, synthesize, and demonstrate knowledge, skills, and competencies as organizational managers and leaders. The students will draw on their Food Retail Management coursework, career experiences, and critical thinking skills. This course is presented as an independent study where students create their own business planning project for a particular area within the food retail industry approved by their academic and/ or industry advisor. Outcomes will demonstrate consumer insight, research skills, and experienced-based learning to complete a written plan and presentation delivered to the cohort on the final night of the program.

  • Credits: 4
FRM 400 Category Management FRM-400
  • This course emphasizes the issues involved in developing and maintaining profitable category management. Areas of concentration include strategy, process, benchmarking, information technology, and building collaborative relationships in the supply chain. Students will apply techniques for managing categories as strategic units producing more profitable business results while focusing on delivering consumer value. The course will also examine new shopper merchandising strategies that are evolving in the retail environment. Students will select a retail banner and create a category management plan for the business as the final project.

  • Credits: 4
FRM 415 Category Management FRM-415
  • This course emphasizes the issues involved in developing and maintaining profitable category management. Areas of concentration include strategy, process, benchmarking, capabilities, information technology, and collaborative relationships with trading partner and suppliers. Students will apply techniques for managing categories as strategic units producing more profitable business results while focusing on delivering consumer value. The student will prepare papers and presentations on the coursework that demonstrate category management strategies.

  • Credits: 3
FRM 321 Food Marketing & Merchandising FRM-321
  • This course explores the foundation of marketing and merchandising in the food industry. The focus will be on consumer demand, segmentation and positioning, integrated marketing communications, branding, and promotional strategies. Students will develop techniques to establish and maintain the correct merchandise assortment for a given trade area, and how to analyze the environmental scan of the industry. Students will create their own marketing plans based on overall value related to usefulness, cost/benefit analysis and social value.

  • Credits: 4
FRM 335 Food Mktg & Merch Strategy FRM-335
  • This course builds on previous coursework to analyze consumer demand for food, branding and promotional strategies within retail food formats. Students will develop techniques used to establish and maintain the correct merchandise assortment for a given trade area, how to develop a retail pricing strategy, and how to monitor the effects of a pricing strategy on store profitability. The final project will provide students with an opportunity to synthesize and demonstrate mastery of the key elements introduced during the program to develop FRMMM store-level support services to drive sales through innovative merchandising and marketing strategies.

  • Credits: 3
FRM 345 Food Supply Chain Management FRM-345
  • This course focuses on effective and efficient supply chain management to move food from the farmland to the consumers table. Basic concepts and practices within the food retail industry specific to material, information, technology and supplier relationships will be explored. Students will analyze revenue generating activities to achieve customer value leading to growth through collaborative partner relationships along the supply chain. Students will prepare a major project that examines product movement along the supply chain.

  • Credits: 3
FRM 420 Food Supply Chain Mgmt FRM-420
  • This course focuses on effective and efficient supply chain management to move food from the farmland to the consumer's table. Basic concepts and practices within the food retail industry specific to material, information, technology, pricing and supplier relationships will be explored. Students will analyze revenue generating activities to achieve customer value leading to growth through collaborative partner relationships along the supply chain. In the final project, students will research, analyze and make recommendations to improve the supply chain in their organization.

  • Credits: 4
FRM 315 Foundations Global Food Ind FRM-315
  • This course will focus on marketing principles with an analysis of the Food Industry from the farm to the table (supply chain). Key areas of study will be an overview of agricultural economics, food distribution, wholesaling and retailing. Critical areas impacting the industry including behavioral and social trends as well as consolidation trends will be explored. Students will prepare a final project on a current key topic such as food safety or the eco-environment based on readings and learning's in the coursework.

  • Credits: 3
FRM 441 HR Strategy & Leadership FRM-441
  • This course looks at human resource management and the skill set necessary for recruiting, retaining, and optimizing human capital in a retail food environment. Students will apply communication styles and conflict resolution to meet the challenges of a diverse retail work place from an operating manager's perspective. Emphasis will be placed on the cultural, behavioral, and legal issues faced by companies as they attempt to compete in an expanding economy. This course introduces leadership in dynamic, changing organizations where customers change, technologies shift, and work processes evolve. In the final project students will complete a strategic human resource strategy plan for a selected firm.

  • Credits: 4
FRM 430 HR Strategy FRM-430
  • This course looks at human resource management and the skill set necessary for recruitment and retention across generations in a retail food environment. Students will apply communications styles and conflict resolution to meet the challenges of a diverse retail work place from an operating manager's perspective. Emphasis will be placed on the cultural, behavioral, and legal issues faced by companies as they attempt to compete in an expanding economy. The student will demonstrate content knowledge through papers and presentations on related topics as well application of the material to the food retail business through the final project.

  • Credits: 3
FRM 410 Industry Project FRM-410
  • This course will be developed as an independent study with a retail mentor and academic advisor. The student will focus on specific industry issues that are timely and relevant to food retail management (Examples: Food Safety, the Eco-Green Environment, Marketing to the Hispanic Consumers, Strategies for Healthy Food Marketing, and New Retail Technologies). Students will research independently providing periodic updates throughout the first half of the program. This course will culminate with a final paper and presentation on a specific course date.

  • Credits: 3
FRM 310 Innovation FRM-310
  • This course introduces innovation as an essential for the new rule of business. Students will learn the framework and techniques to systematize innovative allowing them to take advantage of emerging opportunities. They will use the knowledge to understand how innovation affects the way we deploy resources to fulfill customer desires viewing themselves as agents of innovation within organizations. Students will submit papers and presentations to demonstrate the process integration and collaborative nature of innovation as they analyze new trends in the market place.

  • Credits: 3
FRM 425 Intro Food Retail Operations FRM-425
  • This course will focus on effective retail operations covering areas such as competition, the consumer, trading areas, merchandising and marketing strategies, and retail branding. The changing retail environment and the global impact of operations will also be covered. The student will demonstrate subject mastery through a retail operations analysis of an area relating to the coursework

  • Credits: 3
FRM 350 Leadership/Group Dynamics FRM-350
  • This course introduces leadership in dynamic, changing organizations where customers change, technologies shift, and work processes evolve. Students will examine how leaders develop themselves and others and create alignment as an organization changes to meet future needs. Students will also explore collaborative styles for effective group management and analyze group decision making techniques to gain consensus. Students will focus on analysis of case materials and the strategic practices of studentsÀ organizations within a retail environment.

  • Credits: 3
FRM 435 Retail Food Operational Mgmt FRM-435
  • This course will further explore the food retail operation and its position within the supply chain. The student will analyze opportunities for retail management to drive sales, improve operational results and profitability as well as how to direct change in a consolidating and complex industry. The final coursework project will incorporate the material from both retail operations coursework and apply material to relevant business strategies within the context of the course material

  • Credits: 3
FRM 351 Retail Food Operations Mgmt FRM-351
  • This course will focus on effective retail operations within the supply chain covering areas such as competition, the consumer, trading areas, merchandising and marketing strategies, and retail branding. The student will analyze opportunities for retail management to drive sales, improve operational results and profitability as well as how to direct change in a consolidating and complex industry. The final project will incorporate the material from retail operations coursework and apply the material to relevant business strategies.

  • Credits: 4
FRM 330 Understanding Food Consumers FRM-330
  • This course highlights the major buyer behavior models focusing on the food retail consumer. Students will gain a better understanding of buyer behavior along the food supply chain. Key concepts will include attitudes, culture and perceptions that impact consumer behavior at the retail level and with new products/concept development including research. Students will demonstrate relevant business application within the context of the coursework

  • Credits: 3
FRM 341 Understanding Food Consumers FRM-341
  • This course explores the foundation of marketing and merchandising in the food industry. The focus will be on consumer demand, segmentation and positioning, integrated marketing communications, branding, and promotional strategies. Students will develop techniques to establish and maintain the correct merchandise assortment for a given trade area, and how to analyze the environmental scan of the industry. Students will create their own marketing plans based on overall value related to usefulness, cost/benefit analysis and social value.

  • Credits: 4

G

GBS 300 Advanced Public Policy GBS-300
  • This course will focus on advanced study of advocacy based legislation techniques, ethics, and politics of getting your agenda passed. Course topics would include: 1) advanced study and hands on approach to crafting legislative agendas, 2) the detailed technique and art of successful legislative advocacy, 3) an examination of ethical questions that affect legislative advocacy, and 4) how to work with congressional offices, leaders, and the public.

  • Credits: 2
GBS 250 Business Law/Mktg Professional GBS-250
  • This course begins with the essential concepts of business law and proceeds to survey the following legal topics: 1) Contracts; 2) Agency Law, 3)Intellectual Property,4) Employment Law, 5) Torts, 6) Business Organizations, which includes tax and liability considerations when forming a corporation, LLC, LLP, partnership or sole proprietorship.

  • Credits: 3
GBS 355 Feasibility Study and Analysis GBS-355
  • This course helps the emerging entrepreneur to define and understand the basic concepts of market research and apply the concepts to their business; documenting industry, target markets, competitive analysis and trends and creating a customer profile.

  • Credits: 3
GBS 350 Fndn / Entrepreneurial Success GBS-350
  • This course helps entrepreneurs define and understand the basic concepts, theory of entrepreneurship, understand small business best practices, and practically apply them to their business enterprise.

  • Credits: 3
GBS 260 Internet Law/Mktg Professional GBS-260
  • This course explores the legal doctrines applicable to blogs, websites, website links, online advertising, domain names, and other aspects of internet marketing. Topics include First Amendment rights, trademark usage in domain names, advertising, and website text; libel of famous and non-famous persons; trademark dilution in product reviews; cyber-squatters; resolution of domain name disputes; and copyright law applied to website text, meta-tags, photos, music, and video.

  • Credits: 3
GBS 220 Introduction to Business Law GBS-220
  • This course introduces the essential concepts of business law including Contracts, Agency Law, Intellectual Property, Employment Law, Torts, and Business Organizations, which includes tax and liability considerations when forming a corporation, LLC, LLP, partnership, or sole proprietorship.

  • Credits: 2
GBS 270 Introduction to Public Policy GBS-270
  • This course would focus on how public policy is determined and interpreted by our society, including how individuals or grassroots mobilization, public and private institutions, special interest groups and the media, shape or kill public policy or legislation and how this affects policy. The goal is to give students more than just an understanding of public policy making and issue advocacy. This course will provide students with practical techniques, skills and vehicles to understand how agenda can become law.

  • Credits: 2
GBS 612 Proj Mgmt Prof Exam Prep GBS-612
  • This one day intensive covers: *Information on the exam*The PMP application process*How to prepare for and take the exam*Study guides and study approach for PMP exam*Sample questions *CD simulation of PMP exam

  • Credits: 1
GBS 312 Project Mgmt Exam Prep GBS-312
  • This one day intensive covers: *Information on the exam*The PMP application process*How to prepare for and take the exam*Study guides and study approach for PMP exam*Sample questions *CD simulation of PMP exam

  • Credits: 1
GBS 310 Project Mgmt Intensive GBS-310
  • Through lecture, exercises, and computer simulation students will learn basic through advanced tools and techniques for managing and leading a project. Participant teams will apply learning through a computer simulated real-life project and will experience the stages of their own team's development.

  • Credits: 3
GBS 610 Project Mgmt Intensive GBS-610
  • Through lecture, exercises, and computer simulation students will learn basic through advanced tools and techniques for managing and leading a project. Participant teams will apply learning through a computer simulated real-life project and will experience the stages of their own team's development.

  • Credits: 3
GE 101 Human Geography GE-101
  • Human Geography is an introduction to the basic techniques and concepts of geography. Population, culture, livelihood, settlements and political geography are introduced with emphasis placed on the human role in inhabiting and changing the landscape.

  • Credits: 2
GMBA 512 Accounting & Managrl Finance GMBA-512
  • The academic aim of the module is to equip learners with the knowledge, skills, and competencies to understand the importance of investment and financing decisions in order to assist their organization in the creation and capture of value as well as obtaining sustainable competitive advantage and apply this knowledge to other modules to be studied. In this respect, the objective is to provide an essential understanding of financial statement analysis, corporate finance structure, including knowledge of the instruments used by companies to raise finance and manage financial risk.

  • Credits: 6
GMBA 590 Integr Resrch & Consult Proj GMBA-590
  • The Integrative Research and Consultancy Project, RSH 4010 is available for students who have completed the taught element of their studies. The module is designed to be a student led research and consultancy based module, anchored on providing students with relevant academic and industry transferable skills. The module is split into two sections. In section one, the students formulate and complete a research/engagement proposal and turn this into a feasible research plan, while in section two, they engage in the actual research/consultancy. All Integrative Research and Consultancy Projects will be done by the students based on their selected specialist pathway module topics. This is so in order to enable the students carry out independent consultancy research at a Masters level and allow them to meet the desired learning outcomes, while also developing relevant skills and expertise in their chosen specialist pathways.

  • Credits: 12
GMBA 510 Marketing & Decision Making GMBA-510
  • The academic aim of this module is to equip learners with the knowledge, skills, and competencies to allow effective decision making within a complex constantly changing business environment in order to create a capture value. The module also aims to provide studentsÕ a foundation of how to internationalize business.

  • Credits: 6
GMBA 514 Strat Oper Mgmt & Info Systm GMBA-514
  • The academic aim of the module is to equip learners with the knowledge, skills, and competencies to operate effectively in the workplace, increase learnersÕ understanding of operational and information management issues facing the contemporary organization and how these systems can be utilized to ensure competitive advantage by synthesizing and evaluating complex IT issues. Students will also understand how to implement effective operational decisions and to be able to apply knowledge gained in this module in other modules to be studied or in their research and further studies.

  • Credits: 6
GMBA 516 Strategic Mgmt & Leadership GMBA-516
  • Managers need to understand how strategy is formulated in business and how it shapes the direction and activities of an organization. This module introduces students to concepts, theories and frameworks that will aid their understanding of strategic decision-making and its impact on organizations. Application of these techniques will be on ÔliveÕ organizations to ensure teaching and learning is current. The focus of this module is on the nature of strategic decision making, management and leadership in the current increasingly competitive and globalized business environment. It examines how, in such a dynamic environment, competitive advantage might be developed through strategic planning and exploited in a cost-effective manner. Its emphasis is on where and how the organization competes and, in doing this, highlights the strategic significance of different and competing models of company growth. An important theme running through the unit is the development of the capability to create innovative solutions that enhance an organizationÕs competitive position in its chosen markets.

  • Credits: 6
GRK 101 Ancient Greek I GRK-101
  • An introduction to classical Greek, presenting basic grammar through readings selected from ancient authors. The aim is to teach students to read Greek quickly and enjoyably in the context of ancient Greek culture.

  • Credits: 4
GRK 102 Ancient Greek II GRK-102
  • A continuation of GRK 101, presenting basic grammar through readings selected from ancient authors. The aim is to teach students to read Greek quickly and enjoyably in the context of ancient Greek culture.

  • Credits: 4
GRK 211 Beginning Greek I GRK-211
  • Students begin their study of the fundamentals of Greek grammar.

  • Credits: 4
GRK 212 Beginning Greek II GRK-212
  • Students complete their study of the fundamentals of Greek grammar. (Prerequisite: GRK211)

  • Credits: 4
GRK 414 Corinthians GRK-414
  • Through reading of major portions of the Greek texts of both letters, students build their skills in the translation of biblical Greek and analysis of syntactic relationships. Particular attention will be given to the syntax of subordinate clauses. (Pre requisite: completion of GRK 212 with a grade of C or above.)

  • Credits: 2
GRK 412 Galatians and Romans GRK-412
  • Through the reading of the complete Greek texts of Galatians and Romans, students build their skills in the translation of biblical Greek and analysis of grammatical forms. Particular attention will be given to participles. (Prerequisite: GRK212 with a grade of C or above.)

  • Credits: 2
GRK 299 Greek Review GRK-299
  • Students review basic concepts, master of vocabulary and forms, and explore syntactic structures in preparation for the seminary entrance exam.

  • Credits: 1
GRK 251 Intermediate Greek 2 GRK-251
  • By reviewing basic concepts, building mastery of vocabulary and forms, and focusing on syntactic structures, students continue to translate larger blocks of text in Hellenistic Greek.

  • Credits: 2
GRK 250 Intermediate Greek GRK-250
  • By reviewing basic concepts, building mastery of vocabulary and forms, and focusing on syntactic structures, students begin to translate larger of blocks of text in Biblical Greek.

  • Credits: 2
GRK 316 Luke GRK-316
  • Through reading of major portions of the Greek text of Luke, students build their skills in the translation of biblical Greek and analysis of grammatical forms. Particular attention will be given to the vocabulary of Luke. Luke is read in the fall term prior to Year C in the liturgical cycle. (Prerequisite: GRK212 with a grade of C or above.)

  • Credits: 2
GRK 314 Mark GRK-314
  • Through reading of the complete Greek text of Mark, students build their skills in the translation of biblical Greek and analysis of grammatical forms. Particular attention will be given to nouns, pronouns, and adjectives. Mark is read in the fall term prior to Year B in the liturgical cycle. (Prerequisite: GRK212 with a grade of C or above.)

  • Credits: 2
GRK 312 Matthew GRK-312
  • Through reading of major portions of the Greek text of Matthew, students build their skills in the translation of biblical Greek and analysis of grammatical forms. Particular attention will be given to the indicative verb. Matthew is read in the fall term prior to Year A in the liturgical cycle. (Prerequisite: GRK212 with a grade of C or above.)

  • Credits: 2
GRK 416 Other Epistles GRK-416
  • Through selected reading of the Greek texts of a wide variety of epistolary writings, students build their skills in the translation of biblical Greek and in the analysis of textual variants. Particular attention will be given to texts displaying a broad range of textual variation. (Prerequisite: GRK212 with a grade of C or above.)

  • Credits: 2

H

HBR 311 Biblical Hebrew I HBR-311
  • This course is a study of the biblical Hebrew language. Emphasis is on basic grammar and vocabulary. Students will be introduced to the strong verb and to noun paradigms.

  • Credits: 4
HBR 312 Biblical Hebrew II HBR-312
  • The study of basic Hebrew grammar is continued in this course. Students are introduced to weak verbs and to the study of the Hebrew text of the Torah. (Prerequisite: HBR311)

  • Credits: 4
HBR 413 Biblical Hebrew: Poetry Read HBR-413
  • The course has the following objectives: a review of basic biblical Hebrew grammar, introduction to Hebrew syntax, vocabulary review, and readings from the Old Testament poetic texts. (Prerequisite: HBR312)

  • Credits: 2
HBR 411 Biblical Hebrew: Prose Read HBR-411
  • A review of basic biblical Hebrew grammar, introduction to Hebrew syntax, vocabulary review, and readings from the Old Testament prose texts. (Prerequisite: HBR312)

  • Credits: 2
HCA 520 Diversity in Health Care HCA-520
  • Students use literature, interviews and class discussion to explore the values, beliefs, customs and perceptions represented in various kinds of diversity affecting social and economic life. Students explore the obligations and implications of equal opportunity in organizations while they develop organizational strategies to benefit from diversity.

  • Credits: 3
HCA 555 Economic Issues in Aging Pop HCA-555
  • This course will look at the economic issues surrounding aging population. Examining projections and trends, students will analyze the elements in our society that play important roles in providing people with income and health security, which are currently hot topics in both our Federal and State governments. Medicare and Medical Assistance, social security, private pensions, and long-term care insurance are examples of topics to study. The course looks at how public policy effects different populations such as minorities and women with discussion on how to revamp our system across the generations

  • Credits: 3
HCA 545 Grant Writing and Fundraising HCA-545
  • This course offers students an opportunity to develop skills in fundraising. It will include reviewing successful grants, researching grant opportunities, the grant writing process, assembling documentation, managing and evaluating a grant, and reporting procedures. Processes for both for-profit and nonprofit will be compared.

  • Credits: 3
HCA 510 Health & Phys Characteristics HCA-510
  • This course examines the physical process of aging and the physiological changes that accompany the aging process, relating these to the social and economic factors that affect health status and independent living. Students will study the characteristics of age-related diseases such as AlzheimerÕs, Dementia, Incontinence, Heart Disease, Arthritis, Vision and Eye Diseases.

  • Credits: 3
HCA 535 Marketing to Older Adult HCA-535
  • This course examines marketing principles as applied to aging services organizations, and learning about the distinctive concepts and objectives for this demographic. Students will examine varied cultures and learn to apply marketing concepts based on their target audience and product.

  • Credits: 3
HCA 565 Master’s Thesis HCA-565
  • Thesis or Project related to their specific field of interest.

  • Credits: 3
HCA 540 Professional Ethics HCA-540
  • Students will gain an understanding of the roots of ethical practice and consider moral behavior in light of a changing and diverse society and the complicated issues of modern science and technology. This course examines abuse and neglect in its various forms, the signs and symptoms, reporting requirements, and how those working with older adults, as mandated reporters, can work with Adult Protective Services and the other legal, medical, and community agencies that deal with this difficult and complex issue.

  • Credits: 3
HCA 525 Program Dev & Service Delivery HCA-525
  • Students will gain an understanding of the structural problems that underlie the challenges in using formal services. The course will cover a wide range of services that older people may need, both formal and informal services, service coordination and integration, and the role of both consumer directed and professional case management in negotiating service systems. Types of care facilities would also be discussed: memory care, assisted living, home care, and long-term care.

  • Credits: 3
HCA 500 Public Policy and Aging HCA-500
  • This course examines social policy in both the United States and Minnesota specifically, looking at the current major issues affecting older adults such as income security and health care financing. Programs mandated by the Older Americans Act are explored. The process of how a health care bill becomes law will be researched.

  • Credits: 3
HCA 530 Research Methods HCA-530
  • Introduce students to qualitative research methods within the context of aging. Quantitative research will look at methodologies and technologies of social science research emphasizing the diversity in our aging population.

  • Credits: 3
HCA 515 Spirituality and Aging HCA-515
  • This course explores and examines issues around spirituality and faith, to promote the lives, health, and spiritual well-being of older adults of all faiths and cultures. Faith is important to older adults; understanding the various practices of our diversified community is necessary to serve them and meet their needs. Inviting various clergy from our community would be an enhancement to this course.

  • Credits: 3
HCM 540 Health Care Biomedical Ethics HCM-540
  • Many hospitals have ethical boards to help with difficult decision making. This speaks to the increasing complexity of ethical issues which health care professionals face. This course will look at end-of-life issues, resource allocation issues, decision-making issues, access-to-care issues and other major ethical issues facing health care professionals. This course will explore briefly a Christian understanding of the grounds for ethical decision making.

  • Credits: 4
HCM 555 Health Care Informatics HCM-555
  • A call has come from the highest reaches of government for the computerization of all medical records. Information systems and the interlocking of these systems will be a major concern for health care providers in the years to come. Students will learn how to collect, massage, manipulate data in order to make it useful. There is plenty of useless data and information available; the real professional can mine that data and information into golden nuggets of knowledge.

  • Credits: 4
HCM 560 Hlth Care Strategic Ldrshp HCM-560
  • The distribution system for health care is complex and changing rapidly. The strategy process represents an essential opportunity for health care leaders to establish, implement and guide the organizations direction in these turbulent waters of changing distribution systems. MAP is a process in which students summarize, synthesize, and demonstrate knowledge, skills, and competencies as organizational managers and leaders. Students will draw from their MBA course work, career experiences, and synthesizing activities to build a portfolio.

  • Credits: 4
HCM 699 Intrinsic Coach Dev/Hlth/Well HCM-699
  • This course introduces the Intrinsic CoachingÀ methodology which allows Health and Wellness professionals to expand their ability to work with the whole person. This coaching approach enables individuals about choices as they work to accomplish important outcomes giving the health and wellness professional a more effective, productive, and satisfying way of working with people. Upon completion of this course, you will be able to elicit people's best thinking, including your own, so they and you can accomplish important outcomes.

  • Credits: 3
HCM 299 Intrinsic Coach Dev/HW Profess HCM-299
  • This course introduces the Intrinsic Coaching methodology which allows Health and Wellness professionals to expand their ability to work with the whole person. This coaching approach enables individuals about choices as they work to accomplish important outcomes giving the health and wellness professional a more effective, productive, and satisfying way of working with people. Upon completion of this course, you will be able to elicit people's best thinking, including your own, so they and you can accomplish important outcomes.

  • Credits: 3
HCM 545 Quality Practices HCM-545
  • In order to compete in this new economy, health care entities, particularly hospitals, need to employ quality practices. This course will examine current theory and practices for health care institutions: Six sigma, Lean and other processes and procedures. Students will understand how the quality system interweaves with customer service and happiness.

  • Credits: 4
HCR 330 Comm Strat for Conflict Mgmt HCR-330
  • This course provides an overview of the nature and functions of communication in human conflict. Professionals develop communication skills, such as listening and collaboration, which are necessary for managing conflict productively in interpersonal, organizational and intercultural contexts. Professionals will gain an understanding of patterns, research and processes associated with conflict management styles, and civility. This course will also address how language, perception, gender communication, and generational differences and context influence the conflict process.

  • Credits: 4
HCR 325 Compliance & Regulatory Req. HCR-325
  • The focus of this course is to examine the role law plays in the everyday operation of our health care system from the management perspective. Key topics will include: The Affordable Care Act of 2010, Corporate Compliance and Integrity, Fraud and Abuse, health care laws, and health care regulatory agencies. Laws and bills related to health care in the State of Minnesota will be examined and followed.

  • Credits: 4
HCR 220 Epidemiological Foundation HCR-220
  • This course is designed to provide students with a historical background in epidemiological studies. The course is also designed to expose students to the principles and concepts necessary for understanding the basics of epidemiological investigations.

  • Credits: 4
HCR 435 Ethics & Decision Making HCR-435
  • This is a foundational course in ethics for individuals pursuing vocations of service in health care. Students will have a greater understanding of the ethical principles that are applied to the delivery of health care services and the processes for making sound ethical decisions. Students will develop models of decision making that are consistent with core personal values as well as the ethical standards of their professions. Motivations for ethical healthcare decisions will be evaluated. The roles and responsibilities of healthcare professionals will be explored on the basis of Christian values as well as assumptions drawn from reason and societal norms and expectations.

  • Credits: 4
HCR 400 Health Care Finance HCR-400
  • Explores the major concepts of finance within an organizational context, including basic accounting terms, budgeting, time value of money, types of healthcare payments and insurance systems, and global considerations, as students use standard financial tools to make business assessments and financial decisions important for managers in a healthcare organization.

  • Credits: 4
HCR 340 Hlth Care Info Systems HCR-340
  • This course is designed to introduce students to health care information systems and help them understand why the interlocking of these systems provides numerous challenges and opportunities for health care providers in the years to come. Students will learn how to collect, massage, manipulate data in order to make it useful. There is plenty of useless data and information available; the real professional can mine that data and information into golden nuggets of knowledge.

  • Credits: 4
HCR 350 Hlthcare Div & Global Issues HCR-350
  • Students use literature, interviews and class discussion to explore the values, beliefs, customs and perceptions represented in various kinds of diversity affecting social and economic life. Students explore the obligations and implications of equal opportunity in organizations while they develop organizational strategies to benefit from diversity in the United States and abroad.

  • Credits: 4
HCR 250 Leadership Communication HCR-250
  • This course emphasizes the communication processes of leadership with particular focus on assessing and researching leadership skills, strategic organizational planning, decision making, problem solving, mentoring employees, collaborative team management skills, cultivating a supportive work environment, change management, facilitation and meeting management skills, presentation skills and interviewing skills.

  • Credits: 4
HCR 440 Legal Env for Hlthcare Mgrs HCR-440
  • This course integrates the treatment of law and management. It helps managers and leaders spot legal issues before they become legal problems and emphasizes developing the legal astuteness to craft solutions that attain core organizational objectives without incurring undue legal risk. Traditional legal concepts are discussed as well as current topics in developing areas of the law. An emphasis on ethical concerns stimulates understanding of how managers must incorporate considerations of ethics and social responsibility into their managerial actions.

  • Credits: 4
HCR 300 Strategic Ldrshp Resources… HCR-300
  • The strategy process represents an essential opportunity for health care leaders to establish, implement and guide the organizationÕs direction in these turbulent waters of changing distribution systems. Students will look at the strategies of health care organizations in an increasingly global and competitive marketplace.

  • Credits: 4
HDC 216 The American Drug Problem HDC-216
  • Students will discuss challenges facing a society that continues to change in demographics, norms, and philosophies of dealing with drug abuse and drug offenders, which in turn dictate which resources and how many resources will be made available to deal with the nationÕs drug problem.

  • Credits: 3
HDC 215 The Problem with Drugs HDC-215
  • Students will discuss challenges facing a society that continues to change in demographics, norms, and philosophies of dealing with drug abuse and drug offenders, which in turn dictate which resources and how many resources will be made available to deal with the nation's drug problem. First and foremost, students will be introduced to an overview of the world of drug abuse, its causes, concepts and perceived controls.

  • Credits: 2
HIS 330 America’s Civil War: 1845-1877 HIS-330
  • This course will examine the Civil War era in the United States. The class will emphasize a number of topics including: North-South social and cultural differences, the short and long-term causes of the conflict, Southern secession, slavery and emancipation, Abraham Lincoln's leadership, battles and military strategies, soldier's lives, wartime diplomacy, politics, and economics during the war, the struggles of Reconstruction and the significance of the war in American history.

  • Credits: 4
HIS 385 Britain since 1688 HIS-385
  • Beginning with the Glorious Revolution of 1688, this course explores themes such as the rise of Britain to a world power in the eighteenth century, the impact of the Industrial Revolution and imperialism, the Victorian world view, two world wars and the Thatcher Revolution of the 1980s. Emphasis is placed on understanding Britain's role in a larger European and world context.

  • Credits: 4
HIS 341 Civil Rights Movement in U.S. HIS-341
  • This course will explore the major campaigns, personalities, organizations, and guiding themes of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States. This course will focus on the long civil rights movement; that portion of the struggle characterized by an organized mass movement(s) from World War II through the 1970s, highlighting the shift from protest to electoral politics. The class will place the civil rights movement within the context of American political, economic, and social institutions. It will also analyze the major historical, sociological, and political debates about the Civil Rights/Black Power movements and place those movements in the broader context of national and international developments.

  • Credits: 4
HIS 281 European History 1789 – 1914 HIS-281
  • This survey course looks at the structures, forces and individuals that helped to shape the history of Europe from the French Revolution to the outbreak of World War One. Among the topics considered are the French Revolution and Napoleonic era, industrialization, the revolutions of 1848, socialism, the unification of Germany and European imperialism.

  • Credits: 4
HIS 285 European History Since 1789 HIS-285
  • This comprehensive survey focuses on events and forces that have shaped European history since the French Revolution. The course will examine industrialization, the revolutions of 1848, socialism, the unification of Germany, European imperialism, the devastating world wars of the 20th century, as well as the Russian Revolution, National Socialism and the Holocaust, the Cold War standoff, and the birth and expansion of the European Community.

  • Credits: 4
HIS 283 European History since 1914 HIS-283
  • This survey course details the events of Europe's tumultuous 20th century, a period that extends from the outbreak of World War One to the fall of the Berlin Wall and includes two world wars, the Russian Revolution, National Socialism and the Holocaust, the Cold War standoff, and the birth and expansion of the European Community.

  • Credits: 4
HIS 482 French Rev & Napoleonic Era HIS-482
  • This seminar uses scholarly and primary source materials to provide an in-depth look at one of the most influential events of the modern era: the French Revolution. Topics include the origins of the revolution, the use of terror, mob violence, and the historiography of the revolution. Student participation is emphasized.

  • Credits: 2
HIS 395 Hist and Politics Modern Asia HIS-395
  • In-depth study of selected topics in contemporary Asian history, government, and politics. Primary focus will be on India and China, but other historical and political topics, issues, and countries will be covered.

  • Credits: 4
HIS 498 History Internship HIS-498
  • Students participate in internships in state and local government agencies, archives, museums, and related fields of interest under supervision of staff members of the department of history.

  • Credits: 2
HIS 209 History of the Family HIS-209
  • This course looks at the family in a number of cultures at various periods in history. Child rearing, marriage, and kinship are explored. Particular attention is given to the historical influences that have affected the dynamics of the contemporary family.

  • Credits: 4
HIS 357 History on Film HIS-357
  • This course will utilize films to examine and analyze various historical topics, eras, and subjects. Students will speculate and consider how films from the past and the present have judged and interpreted history. The thematic focus for this course will vary.

  • Credits: 4
HIS 382 Hitler’s Germany HIS-382
  • From the unification of Germany in 1871 to the reunification in 1990, stressing the origins and consequences of the National Socialist period, 1933-45. Topics include Bismarck and his political legacy and the divergent paths taken by the two German states in the midst of the East-West conflict after 1945. Emphasis is placed on understanding Germany's role in a larger European context.

  • Credits: 4
HIS 488 Independent Study HIS-488
  • Independent study provides a more flexible educational experience for the student as well as college credit for work done outside the conventional classroom setting. These courses are generally designed and supervised by a faculty member. Students are responsible for completing an application form that specifies course goals, objectives, projected outcomes, learning strategies, and evaluation procedures. The student's advisor, course instructor, department chair, and the dean must approve the proposal.

  • Credits: 0
HIS 403 Intro. to Professional Studies HIS-403
  • History, Political Science, and pre-law students will be introduced to and given opportunities to tour and work in a variety of professional settings: archives, museums, professional record-keeping centers, law offices, etc. Students may use this class to select, an internship site or think more broadly about vocational opportunities in the discipline.

  • Credits: 2
HIS 212 Introduction to History HIS-212
  • Students familiarize themselves with methods of inquiry in history and compare these with the methodologies of other disciplines. The course asks participants to raise relevant questions about the data, sources, and conclusions of the material they examine and to conduct their own inquiry through the completion of a self-designed project.

  • Credits: 4
HIS 267 Introduction to Latin America HIS-267
  • An introduction to modern Latin America, with emphasis on the post-colonial era. Beginning with a discussion of the colonial heritage, the course traces the development of Latin America, its struggle with political instability and economic dependence and the role of the United States in hemispheric development. Primary focus is on Argentina, Brazil, and Chile.

  • Credits: 4
HIS 220 Leaders in American Society HIS-220
  • In this course, students examine the leadership foundations of American society. After examining and discussing these foundations, students will move to non-Western ethical influences of our contemporary society. Students will study the lives of many diverse leaders. In examining the traditional with the contemporary, students will explore the complex ethical framework of our nation.

  • Credits: 4
HIS 362 Mexican History HIS-362
  • This course looks at the structures, forces and individuals that have shaped the history of Mexico. Beginning with pre-Columbian civilizations and the conquest, the course then covers the colonial period, independence in 1821, 19th century liberal modernization and the Revolution (1910À20) before concluding with an assessment of contemporary Mexico. Relations with the United States receive special emphasis.

  • Credits: 4
HIS 320 Minnesota History HIS-320
  • This course will examine the social, cultural, economic, and political history of Minnesota from pre-European contact to the present. Special emphasis will be placed on American Indian and European-American conflict. This course will also focus on interrelationship between Minnesota's geophysical environment and socio-cultural development. Topics will include Native American life and culture, European settlement, the fur trade, immigration, economic and industrial development, political institutions, cultural legacy, ethnic heritage, and Minnesota's place in the global community.

  • Credits: 2
HIS 393 Modern China, 1911-present HIS-393
  • This course will study the effects of Western colonialism, the Sino-Japanese War, and World War I on China, and trace the development of the modern Chinese state, including the formation of the People's Republic of China and Taiwan. Emphasis will also be placed on China's relations with other countries around the world, as well as its treatment of ethnic minorities within its own borders.

  • Credits: 4
HIS 337 Parties, Campaigns, & Election HIS-337
  • Analysis of party organizations, campaigns, and presidential and congressional elections in the United States. Attention will be given to state and local party structures and activities, third-party movements, and historical patterns of voting behavior.

  • Credits: 4
HIS 339 Race & Ethnicity inUS Hist HIS-339
  • This course examines those who came or were brought to the United States through the slave trade, economic, social, and political dislocations in different parts of the world and more personal factors. Various modes of assimilation and diversity will be discussed, as will the stories of many of the different peoples who have served to create the citizenry of the United States.

  • Credits: 4
HIS 487 Readings Seminar:Tpcs in Hist. HIS-487
  • Readings/Research Seminar in History covering various, selected topics. This course will emphasize the use of scholarly and primary source materials; historiography and interpretation, archival research, and student participation. Recent readings-seminar topics include: America in the 1960s; the French Revolution and Napoleon, Minnesota History, and the Russian Revolution.

  • Credits: 2
HIS 342 Reformation HIS-342
  • This course traces the social, political and economic trends in Europe from 1500À1648 as they interrelate with the Reformation of the Church. Particular attention is focused upon the work of Luther, Calvin, the Anabaptists, and Loyola in order to illustrate the many facets of religious reform in this era.

  • Credits: 4
HIS 401 Research & Writing in History HIS-401
  • This serves as the research and writing capstone course for History majors and minors. After reading other scholars' ideas and interpretations in various classes, students will now have the opportunity to research, analyze, and write their own original work of scholarship. Students will do original research projects using primary source materials (newspapers, oral history interviews, government documents, letters, diaries, etc.), rather than scholarly articles or books. Student can select their own topic, but must coordinate with an instructor. Assessment goals include sound research, adequate content and coverage of the subject, strong critical analysis of sources, and writing style.

  • Credits: 2
HIS 340 Slavery & Freedom the Americas HIS-340
  • This course explores the history and demise of chattel slavery in the Americas by using a global approach to examine developments and conditions of slavery and emancipation in Latin America, the Caribbean region, and the United States. By comparing slavery in the U.S. to other slave systems the class will explore whether the legacy of race relations in the Southern U.S. was exceptional or typical. Topics will include: the Atlantic slave trade, slave life and slave culture, the expansion of slavery in the southern United States, resistance to slavery and violent revolution in Haiti, the long demise of slavery in the Americas, and the efforts of freed people to give meaning to their new birth of freedom.Ó

  • Credits: 4
HIS 202 St. Paul Gangsters HIS-202
  • Experience the fascinating history of St. PaulÕs infamous gangsters and underworld leaders who claim to have run the city during the 1920Õs and 1930Õs. Students will attend class and then see the sites where the gangsters lived it up and committed some of the most notorious crimes in the upper Midwest.

  • Credits: 2
HIS 332 The Cold War: A Global Persp HIS-332
  • This course examines the causes, actions, and results of a conflict between the world's superpowers that shaped the direction of global affairs for more than forty years. This course will allow the students to view the Cold War through the eyes of the United States, the Soviet Union, their allies, and many other countries that served as proxies during this period. Both the history and the international system will be emphasized.

  • Credits: 4
HIS 389 The Holocaust HIS-389
  • This course will introduce students to the history of the Holocaust and to individuals who embodied those issues. We will examine the historical development of anti-Semitism, German political and cultural history of the 19th and 20th centuries and the actions taken against Jews that culminated in the attempted implementation of a final solution to the Jewish question. Course will consist of lectures, readings and discussion, with occasional guest speakers and films.

  • Credits: 4
HIS 333 The Industrial Revolution HIS-333
  • This course traces the most explosive period of growth and change in American history. Covering the presidencies of Ulysses S. Grant through Woodrow Wilson, this course intensively examines the American metamorphosis from divided, wounded and fractious nation to industrial juggernaut and policeman of the world. Major themes include: the final days of red-white conflict, issues of black freed people, immigration, industrialization and urbanization, robber barons, labor unrest, muckrakers and reformers, and political and social movements.

  • Credits: 4
HIS 372 The Second World War HIS-372
  • The Second World War seen from economic, social, military and political points of view; other topics include the causes of the war and the various post-war problems. European or American perspective depending on the instructor. No prerequisites.

  • Credits: 4
HIS 351 Themes in US History HIS-351
  • This course will explore a specific topic or topics selected by the instructor, and will expand the student's understanding and appreciation of the history and historiography of the given subjects(s). (Pre-Req. waiver can be signed by professor.)

  • Credits: 4
HIS 355 Themes in World History HIS-355
  • This course will explore a specific topic or topics selected by the instructor, and will expand the student's understanding and appreciation of the history and historiography of the given subjects(s). (Pre-Req waiver can be signed by professor).

  • Credits: 4
HIS 325 U.S. Business History HIS-325
  • The course will primarily examine the role of business in the American economy from the colonial period to the present. The course will focus on the development of capitalism and the corporation, with an emphasis on the interaction between business firms and other institutions in American lifeÑincluding labor unions and the government. Students will study business, labor, and other economic institutions starting in the 17th century and ending with the modern global corporation. Topics will include the fur trade, early American industrialization, railroads, the slave economy, the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, labor strife, and the modern corporation.

  • Credits: 4
HIS 334 US Foreign Policy HIS-334
  • This course examines the goals and consequences of American foreign policy and diplomacy from the founding of the republic to the present day. Topics include commercial and territorial expansion, America's relationships with other states and nations, World Wars I and II, the Cold War, Vietnam, U.S. imperialism, and the current conflicts over terrorism and natural resources. The perspectives of other peoples and nations will be emphasized.

  • Credits: 4
HIS 233 USA since 1877 HIS-233
  • This survey course traces American history from Reconstruction to the present time. The course will begin by focusing on the nation's emergence as a world power and its failure to keep the promises it made in the 13th & 15th amendments. Students will also examine: America's various reform movements, World War I, the Roaring Twenties, the Depression and New Deal, World War II, the Cold War, Civil Rights, Vietnam, the 1960s counterculture, Watergate, the oil and Iran hostage crises, the Reagan revolution, the Gulf War, the Clinton years, the 2000 election and the 9/11 attacks.

  • Credits: 4
HIS 231 USA to 1877 HIS-231
  • This survey course traces American history from colonial times through Reconstruction. The course emphasizes a broad range of topics including: colonial settlement patterns, the growth of slavery, the Revolution, the development of nationalism, the Age of Jackson, Westward expansion, sectionalism, and the Civil War and Reconstruction.

  • Credits: 4
HIS 390 Vietnam War HIS-390
  • This course examines, from historical and political perspectives, the Vietnam War era. While an emphasis will be placed on America's role in the conflict; international geopolitical factors will also be investigated. Other topics might include the development of Vietnamese nationalism, the Cold War, French colonialism, Washington's initial commitment to Vietnam, the increase in American involvement from 1954-1965, the Gulf of Tonkin, the failure of military strategy, antiwar protests, the war's legacy, and the impact of the Vietnam War on current politics in Laos, Cambodia, and Thailand, and Southeast Asia. The plight and conditions of the Hmong people, both during and after the war, will be highlighted in this course.

  • Credits: 4
HIS 113 Western Civ. Since Reformation HIS-113
  • Beginning with the Reformation, this course places major emphasis on the growth and progress of Western culture and civilization and European institutions. Topics include the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, Romanticism, and twentieth century totalitarianism. INT111 is not a prerequisite for this course.

  • Credits: 4
HIS 111 Western Civilization to 1648 HIS-111
  • Beginning with the Egyptian society, this course places major emphasis on the growth and progress of Western culture and civilization and European institutions. Topics include the Hellenistic world, Rome, medieval Europe, and the Renaissance.

  • Credits: 4
HIS 367 Women’s History HIS-367
  • An analysis of the social, political, and economic role of women in America and around the world. This course will cover both the history of women as well as contemporary issues concerning gender and equality. Global issues and themes will be accentuated.

  • Credits: 4
HIS 221 World Culture: Greece & Rome HIS-221
  • This course studies the cultural history of ancient Greece and Rome with a focus on the interaction of diverse cultural elements which shape the metropolitan and cosmopolitan world culture of which we are heirs.

  • Credits: 4
HIS 121 World History HIS-121
  • A comparative introduction to the development of cultures in Europe, the Americas, Asia and Africa. Topics include the age of exploration from a global perspective; the rise of the West; religious, economic and political revolutions; imperialism; changes in the patterns of everyday life. No prerequisites.

  • Credits: 4
HMG 301 Hmong Cosmology and Belief HMG-301
  • This class will explore all the aspects of Hmong beliefs and the different forms of religions that are practiced by the Hmong throughout the world. Students will learn from books/assigned readings, lectures, class interaction and field work/observation.

  • Credits: 4
HMG 201 Hmong Culture and Society HMG-201
  • Through a combination of lectures and field work experiences, students will gain a better understand of the Hmong community here and throughout the world as they deal with changes relating to globalization and acculturation.

  • Credits: 4
HMG 202 Hmong Literature and Art HMG-202
  • In this course, students will explore the various literatures (folk as well as modern) and art forms that have been in use by the Hmong for over 4,000 years. A combination of field experiences/observations, and readings as well class discussion will be used.

  • Credits: 4
HMG 101 Intro to Hmong Studies HMG-101
  • Through a combination of lectures, reading and research, students will gain a better understanding of the Hmong community and the area of Hmong studies through the work of Hmong scholars and researchers from around the world.

  • Credits: 2
HMG 110 Introduction to Hmong History HMG-110
  • This course will examine the rich history of the Hmong people in China, Laos, Thailand, Vietnam and America and the various roles that the Hmong have had on these nations. The class will also look at the various challenges and opportunities that the Hmong faced in these countries.

  • Credits: 4
HMG 254 People & Culture SE Asia HMG-254
  • This course explores the people and culture of countries in Southeast Asia including Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos. These Southeast Asia countries known for their ancient culture, increasing modernization and breathtaking beauty, provide a rich setting for interdisciplinary learning. This course is designed to introduce students to the region's history and culture. Students will learn about language, literature, history, religion, economics, politics, education, arts and other aspects of Thai, Vietnamese, Cambodian and Laotian cultures. Students will receive an orientation prior to the trip that will acquaint them with the course and its learning objectives. Classroom instruction and cultural appreciation will be integrated with the cultural tours. Particular attention is given to the Hmong experience in two comparative contexts: Southeast Asia, and the United States. The program will take place in a number of southeast Asian countries: Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam.

  • Credits: 4
HMG 255 People and Culture of China HMG-255
  • China, known for its ancient culture, increasing modernization and breathtaking beauty, provides a rich setting for interdisciplinary learning. This course is designed to introduce students to the people and culture of China. Students will learn about the Chinese language, literature, history, religion, economics, politics, education, arts and other aspects of Chinese culture. Students will receive an orientation and become acquainted with the course objectives prior to the course. Classroom instruction and cultural appreciation will be integrated with a cultural tour of Beijing, Xi'an , and other major Chinese cities and sites. Visits to the great wall of china, the temple of heaven, the summer palace, Tiananmen Square, the forbidden city, and the Lama Temple. Excursions will be made to local markets, a Chinese cooking class, a river cruise, a site visit to a Chinese school, the Terracotta Warriors, and a Hmong village. Particular attention is given to the Hmong experience in two comparative contexts: China, and the United States.

  • Credits: 4
HMG 328 Reading & Wrtng for Hmong-Intm HMG-328
  • With regular interactive group activities, students will enhance their Hmong through a series of reading and writing Hmong short stories, poems, proverbs as well as key activities surrounding family and social events.

  • Credits: 2
HMG 327 Reading and Writing for Hmong HMG-327
  • Students enrolled in the class will gain general understanding of the origin of the Hmong language and also be able to read and write basic Hmong.

  • Credits: 2
HON 210 Being Human & Christian in Wrl HON-210
  • Students explore their values and beliefs in view of the needs of the less fortunate and the impact of human life on the planet. Particular attention is paid to the role of technology in contemporary life. Students explore Christian concepts of vocation and service.

  • Credits: 8
HON 410 Building for Eternity HON-410
  • During their senior year, honors students reconvene to explore again the integration of faith and learning for the sake of others and the world. Through a final project in their chosen discipline, students set a course for on-going learning and service in the context of the Christian gospel.

  • Credits: 2
HON 120 Hearing Their Voices:Globalism HON-120
  • Students explore the needs of the world through the eyes of the poor and the marginalized. Students assess global conditions of population, health, economic development, ecology, and political expression in view of human responsibility for creation and the Biblical concern for the poor. Students analyze theoretical and practical approaches to addressing global inequities and needs.

  • Credits: 8
HON 110 Perspectives, Approaches, Gosp HON-110
  • Using primary texts and artifacts set in their historical/cultural contexts students examine the ways in which peoples of the west, east, and south have apprehended their world, humanity, and God over time. Sciences, arts, and the religious texts of Christianity will serve to challenge students to develop a world view that integrates faith and learning.

  • Credits: 8
HON 220 Scholarship & Service HON-220
  • Students develop and practice models of learning and service on behalf of others and the world. Students integrate their chosen discipline and their Christianity in their Honors Projects.

  • Credits: 8
HRG 530 Compensation and Benefits HRG-530
  • This course explores employee performance methods, pay and reward systems, employee benefits programs, and total compensation systems. The focal point of the course is on designing pay structures that support organization values and strategic objectives. Topics include the strategic role total compensation plays in organizations, the dynamics of alternative pay systems, sales compensation, executive compensation systems, and employee benefits.

  • Credits: 4
HRG 560 Finance for HR Leaders HRG-560
  • This course will focus on developing Human Resources business acumen as well as a quantitative mindset. Moreover, the practical aspects of strategic and operational roles of accounting and finance are explored. In addition, applications for forecasting, budgeting, financial performance, and fiscal and ethical responsibilities in a global context will be explored.

  • Credits: 4
HRG 580 HR Action Research at Work HRG-580
  • This course will offer students an opportunity to leverage their learning from the entire curriculum and demonstrate their competence in Human Resources problem-solving and leading change. Students will select a topic related to Human Resources leadership. Furthermore, they will use an action research framework and create a high impact deliverable for increasing organization effectiveness.

  • Credits: 4
HRG 500 HR Leadership & Ethics HRG-500
  • This course examines the full scope of human resources activities. It covers a broad list of key Human Resources competencies including strategic management, teaming, problem solving, conflict management, and creativity. This course will also focus on understanding the value and connection between morality, ethics, and values as they relate to the role of Human Resources leadership in our capital system.

  • Credits: 4
HRG 570 Legal Envrnmnt for HR Leaders HRG-570
  • This course covers legal employment issues that Human Resources leaders face in operating organizations in todayÕs complex environment. Students will study the foundations of the United States legal system, the public and international environment, the private environment, and the regulatory environment as it relates to the role of Human Resources practitioner.

  • Credits: 4
HRG 540 Org Dev for HR Professionals HRG-540
  • This course will help Human Resources leaders understand organization development from a leadership and HR perspective. Students will build their capacity to facilitate complex change initiatives using change theories, models, and concepts. Students will demonstrate an understanding of how a complex business environment is driving the need for continuous change.

  • Credits: 4
HRG 520 Recruitment, Selection & Ret HRG-520
  • This course will explore the full spectrum of the talent acquisition process with a focus on making an effective business case for implementing talent acquisition strategies. The course also will cover testing methods, applicant assessment, and employment engagement methods and the laws and regulations impacting staffing in organizations.

  • Credits: 4
HRG 550 Research Methods and Design HRG-550
  • This course provides concentrated learning in action research methodology. The course provides an overview of quantitative and qualitative data collection methods, analysis, intervention selection, and evaluation. The philosophy, ethics, and politics of organizational research are introduced. Students will complete the first phase of their final capstone paper during this course.

  • Credits: 4
HRG 510 Strategic HR and Measurement HRG-510
  • This course examines the role of the Human Resources leader in the development of vision, mission, values, and coherent strategic plans. Students will diagnose their strategic abilities and develop a plan for increasing their personal and team strategic capabilities. Students also will explore the importance of developing a global talent management and metric driven mindset.

  • Credits: 4
HRM 320 Advanced Human Resource Mgmt HRM-320
  • The role of the human resource management function in organizations will be studied. The changing nature of work and demographic shifts will be of particular focus. Students will study all of the roles that the human resource professional plays.

  • Credits: 4
HRM 306 Advanced Issues in Human Resou HRM-306
  • The challenges many organizations face today are complex; new dimensions, such as an increasingly diverse workforce, make it more difficult to ensure HRD efforts will succeed. This course serves as a comprehensive introduction for managers, supervisors, and HR professionals who have had limited course work or experience with HRD.

  • Credits: 2
HRM 435 Business & Personal Ethics HRM-435
  • This class will look at processes and strategies for dealing with ethical dilemmas and situations. Students will work on case studies and look at their own roots in developing their ethical positions. Students will wrap up this class with their own statement of ethical beliefs.

  • Credits: 4
HRM 345 Compensation and Benefits HRM-345
  • How will employees be compensated for their efforts? Salary administration, variable pay, performance management, position evaluation, and reward systems, in terms of monetary and non-monetary pay, will be investigated and evaluated. Employee benefits will also be examined.

  • Credits: 3
HRM 353 Compensation and Benefits Syst HRM-353
  • How will employees be compensated for their efforts? Salary administration variable pay, performance management, position evaluation, HRIS, and reward systems, in terms of monetary and non-monetary pay, will be evaluated. Employee benefits will also be examined.

  • Credits: 4
HRM 201 Contemporary Issues HR Mgmt HRM-201
  • This course provides a foundation in management practices, general employment practices, staffing, human resource development, compensation and benefits, employee labor relations, health, safety, and security. Student enrolled in the BA Human Resources degree completion program are not eligible to take this course for credit.

  • Credits: 2
HRM 420 Employee and Labor Relations HRM-420
  • This course will look at the range of issues dealing with employee relations. The historical roots of labor/management will be examined as well as present day paradigms for that relationship. Techniques such as negotiation and mediation will be practiced.

  • Credits: 3
HRM 213 Employee Recognition & Ret HRM-213
  • The purpose of this course is to establish the value and basic principles of a well-run employee reward/recognition program within an organization. Tools and specific practices for building an effective program will be presented.

  • Credits: 2
HRM 200 Employment Law HRM-200
  • Human Resources Management requires operations to be fully compliant with both state and federal statutes that govern all aspects of employment, beginning with recruitment and hiring through termination. This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of the legal framework impacting human resources practices, and an introduction to applying those principles to practical situations.

  • Credits: 2
HRM 360 Human Resouces in Global Env HRM-360
  • This course addresses topics in human resource management from an international, cross-cultural perspective. The focus of this program is to fully explore human resource issues in a global context.

  • Credits: 2
HRM 340 Human Resource Plan I HRM-340
  • Students will develop a Human Resource Plan for a key human resource function by utilizing class learning, research, audit practices, and mentors. The Human Resource Plan will provide an analysis of the significant aspects of the human resource profession.

  • Credits: 3
HRM 440 Human Resources Plan HRM-440
  • Students will have completed their human resource synthesis project they began months ago and will present it to their cohort.

  • Credits: 4
HRM 300 Intro to Recruiting & Sel HRM-300
  • This course provides an introduction to the subject of recruitment and selection of employees. It will introduce students to assessing organization needs and identifying effective recruiting strategies, including advertising, locating candidate sources,

  • Credits: 2
HRM 350 Legal Issues in Human Resource HRM-350
  • Every human resource professional needs to understand employment law. The historical roots of labor/management will be examined and the application of the law to the present day workplace including wrongful discharge, harassment, interviewing, selection, compensation, and benefits will be discussed and studied. Techniques such as negotiation and mediation will be practiced.

  • Credits: 4
HRM 310 Managing in Organizations HRM-310
  • Students will learn the underlying trends and topics of leadership and management. The class will explore the importance of effective management practice. Topics such as self-directed work teams, motivation, systems theory, quality, and leadership will be studied. Students will investigate their own strengths and areas of personal development in order to understand how best to develop their own leadership capabilities.

  • Credits: 4
HRM 375 Managing Organizational Change HRM-375
  • To understand the complex nature of organizational change, every individual within an organization must understand and apply various change methodologies. This workshop provides an overview of several models of change and their applicability to generic organizations.

  • Credits: 2
HRM 410 Organizational Dev & Change HRM-410
  • This course introduces students to concepts in organizational development. Students will study change theories and how to make organizations more effective while navigating change, how to perform and assess organizational needs, and how to look at various options in training and developing employees.

  • Credits: 4
HRM 312 Performance Management HRM-312
  • Provides basic knowledge to design, implement, and maintain a successful performance management system.

  • Credits: 2
HRM 380 PHR/SPHR Cert Prep Program HRM-380
  • This course is for HR practitioners planning to take the Society of Human Resources Management (SHRM) certification examination for both the Professional in Human Resources (PHR) and Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR) designations. Concordia is working in coordination with Trusight, Inc to offer this learning opportunity.

  • Credits: 3
HRM 352 Staffing the Organization HRM-352
  • How do we find and keep good employees? Every organization in America is grappling with this issue. This course will focus on the many aspects of Talent Management. Students will study recruitment, forecasting, selection, orientation and retention.

  • Credits: 4
HRM 470 Strategic Human Resources HRM-470
  • This course will examine Human Resources professionals as strategic partners with their organizational counterparts. Various cases and readings will be used to illuminate the pivotal role HR can play in influencing the direction of organizations.

  • Credits: 4
HRM 325 Survey & Research Methods HRM-325
  • Basic survey and research methodologies are explored in the context of human resource management. Analysis of professional research articles is studied with an emphasis on reading and understanding research. Students will learn the use of technology as a tool for HR professionals.

  • Credits: 4
HS 575 Community Psychology HS-575
  • Community psychology emphasizes the developmental contributions that environments and communities can make to individuals using an ecological perspective. This course draws upon the insights of community psychology and applies those insights to the learner's professional practice.

  • Credits: 4
HSM 420 Applied Accounting & Finance HSM-420
  • In this course financial information is made easier to comprehend. It provides the foundation for basic principles and concepts that will make non-finance managers better equipped for service to the organization. Students will address financial assessment, budgeting and spending, global and ethical implications of financial decision-making, and financial prioritization for the present and the future. This course will provide the framework for the financials of market planning strategy including sales, new product development, return on investment, price and profit while offering the student an understanding of corporate reports and internal control

  • Credits: 4
HSM 325 Business Ethics HSM-325
  • This course is designed to investigate the broad spectrum of personal, business and society ethical issues that managers/leaders encounter. As corporate America struggles to find its social and ethical identity in a business environment that grows increasingly complex, managers are confronted with exceedingly difficult challenges. These challenges include balancing their economic, legal, ethical, and social responsibilities to the variety of stakeholder groups in which they interact. This course provides the structure for students to explore their personal ethics and develop the framework for addressing tough ethical decisions in business and in marketing. Students will apply ethical frameworks to business problems.

  • Credits: 4
HSM 400 Hospitality HR: Managing HSM-400
  • This course examines the management of the fundamental and most valuable asset in any organization Ð its human resources; and, it will also review the salient issues and key elements critical in building a strong and successful organization. It will review the application of human resource management practices as they apply to the Hospitality and Tourism Industry. This course will encourage students to realize the significance of human resource management (HRM) and its successful application and practice in the Hospitality and Tourism field.

  • Credits: 4
HSM 435 Hospitality Ind Ldrshp Strat HSM-435
  • This course will explore leadership and management in the Hospitality Industry; utilizing proven tools and exercises for creating future leaders in the Hospitality Industry and emphasizing the important role that management skills play in organizations. Leadership, people management, interpersonal skills, and the attention to quality and critical factors ensure future success. Mastering these skills permits career growth as there is no substitute for ethical leadership and management grounded in sound principles and practices.

  • Credits: 4
HSM 440 Hospitality Industry Bus Plan HSM-440
  • Students will create their own business plan for the Hospitality Industry-related organization of their choice. The goal of this course is to enable the student to become proficient in developing his or her own Hospitality Industry business plans.

  • Credits: 4
HSM 410 Hospitality Law & Legal Issues HSM-410
  • The student will be introduced to hospitality law, utilizing proven tools and standard operating procedures for satisfying company objectives. This course is designed to give the student a working understanding of Federal and State laws pertaining to Hospitality Industry-related entities and business operations.

  • Credits: 4
HSM 310 Innovation: Trends in Hosp Ind HSM-310
  • This course will view the future of the Hospitality Industry from a number of different prerogatives including the world economy, the age of terror, tourism trends, with respect to the cruise industry, airlines, restaurants, hotels, resorts and gaming industry. this course will encourage the student to explore and embellish the future of not only the Hospitality Industry, but the world economy and appreciate this quick-paced, ever changing stage where each day is an adventure.

  • Credits: 4
HSM 340 Integrated Mrketing Comm HSM-340
  • This course will focus on developing marketing strategy and executing diverse communication tactics that are critical for business success. The student develops specific targeted communications and campaigns to meet their strategic communication objectives and target markets while integrating elements to gain an appreciation for the promotion mix (personal selling, direct mail, advertising, public relations, electronic and personal selling, etc.) tactics. Students will create their own promotional plans as avenues for transmitting marketing messages effectively and present those to the cohort based on their overall value related to usefulness, cost/benefit analysis and social value.

  • Credits: 4
HSM 345 Interactive & Mobile Marketing HSM-345
  • This course will explore the explosion of Internet marketing options to engage consumers. It is designed as an introduction to the rapidly evolving world of Interactive marketing focusing on the tools of Internet marketing. Students will explore integrating electronic methods into the marketing function. The course includes discussion of the importance of website return on investment and brand building, community development and digital marketing models. Social media strategy and mobile marketing are also built into the course. By analyzing a company's marketing situation the student will complete an Internet marketing plan that aligns to the business objectives.

  • Credits: 4
HSM 430 Marketing Innovation HSM-430
  • This course is the foundation of the marketing program. It reviews the concepts and application-oriented framework for marketing decision-making in a dynamic environment. Students explore current and emerging trends within a shifting marketplace and economic landscape. The five P's of marketing - place, price, product, promotion and people - are the center of this module. The course emphasizes environmental scanning, target customers and achieving organizational objectives through the intentional and skillful blending of marketing strategies. Students will create their own marketing plans within this module.

  • Credits: 4
HSV 570 Applied Ethics HSV-570
  • Students will be introduced to models of ethical decision making, including the vocational ethics of Christianity. The emphasis is on the interplay between the historical models of ethical decision making and the problems professionals face every day.

  • Credits: 2
HSV 421 Community & Family Dynamics HSV-421
  • Understanding family and community dynamics is a basic skill required of all criminal justice professionals. This course examines the interactions of individuals in various settings in a society that continues to change the expectations of the criminal justice system. History, evolution, and demographics of family and community will be explored in relation to the criminal justice professional.

  • Credits: 4
HSV 460 Ethics HSV-460
  • Classical and historical ethics are explored, as well as the student's personal values system. Individuals face tough ethical decisions with increasing frequency in our society, and a framework for addressing those questions is needed. Each student will develop a system for making ethical decisions in their personal and professional life.

  • Credits: 2
HSV 420 Family Systems HSV-420
  • This course familiarizes the student with an understanding of the history, evolution, and demographics of the family. Kinship, family structures, functions, and roles are explored. Particular emphasis will be placed on the family's relationship to other systems and institutions in society.

  • Credits: 4
HSV 542 First Things First: Priorities HSV-542
  • Criminal justice professionals are affected not only by catastrophic events such as the Columbine High School shootings and the World Trade Center attacks, but by the more routine and frequent aspects of the job as well. This course examines stress from a leadership perspective, asking why and how employers should respond to mental health issues. Theory, research, and trends in employee assistance are discussed as students consider how employers can help prevent, mitigate, and respond to emotional issues impacting personnel on the job.

  • Credits: 4
HSV 550 Leadership Theory/Develop HSV-550
  • This course explores the issue of management and strategic planning. How can I use my own personal gifts and talents to motivate and manage? How can I market my program? How can I creatively plan for the future? These questions and others are addressed in this course.

  • Credits: 4
HSV 490 Portfolio and Synthesis HSV-490
  • This final course is designed to help learners reflect on all they have done in the BA program. Through guest speakers, research study, and reflection on practice, students will synthesize all they have learned. Preparation of a professional portfolio will cap the learning experience.

  • Credits: 2
HSV 401 Returning Student Seminar HSV-401
  • This seminar course covers five areas that are critical to learner success: goal-setting, library, writing, personal life balance, and computer literacy. Each of the five areas are covered briefly, and then learners choose an area to explore with an instructor. This course models the collaborative learning and the self-directedness of the program.

  • Credits: 2

I

INF 250 Google Android Mobile App Devl INF-250
  • Google Android Mobile Application Development provides students with an in depth look at the current state of mobile computing application development specifically using the Software Development Kits (SKDs), tools, widgets, and Integrated Drive Electronics (IDEs) specifically tailored for Android Development. Students will conduct a project management exercise to enhance customer and/or employee experience by planning, analyzing and gathering requirements before designing an interactive Android application.

  • Credits: 3
INF 470 Social Media Marketing INF-470
  • In this course, students will explore the latest tools and trends in social media applied to marketing, advertising, and communication. Using case studies from large corporations, small businesses, and non-profits, students will examine current examples and future opportunities of how marketing professionals use social networks, user-generated content, and blogs for shaping marketing activities.

  • Credits: 2
ITA 101 Intro. Italian Lang & Culture ITA-101
  • Learning the basics of Italian and the culture of Italy.

  • Credits:
ITM 340 Applied Research Project I ITM-340
  • This seminar provides a forum for discussion of issues and problems encountered in the development of the ITM project, a capstone course integrating the information systems knowledge gained through the other courses. Students evaluate each other's project design and plan, organize, and conduct a walk-through exercise. In addition, students are introduced to advanced project management techniques used to manage highly innovative projects.

  • Credits: 2
ITM 440 Applied Research Project ITM-440
  • This seminar helps students complete a synthesis project integrating business and technology knowledge gained through the Innovation and Technology Management (ITM) program coursework. The project addresses actual worksite needs, both human and technical. A problem or need is selected and a proposal to solve the problem or meet the need is prepared. A thorough analysis is conducted including cost-benefit, requirements gathering, options analysis, and measured success to address a business need.

  • Credits: 4
ITM 420 Applied Syst Analysis & Design ITM-420
  • Study all phases of the project lifecycle with an emphasis on creating a first draft for the Planning and Analysis phases of the studentÕs Applied Research Project. Utilize contemporary case studies such as mobile applications development to compare software and infrastructure development methodologies such as the Systems Development Lifecycle and Agile Methods. Create a common understanding of project requirements by interviewing key stakeholders and diagramming to communicate process workflow. Apply learned skills to key decision-making tasks such as in-house development, outsourcing, software testing, business requirements gathering, and Cloud Computing.

  • Credits: 4
ITM 415 Biblical Christianity ITM-415
  • The question, What is religious thought? will be explored in the light of American culture. Students wrestle with basic questions of life, such as What is the meaning of life? World religions are discussed from the perspective of a Christian belief system. This course satisfies a general education requirement.

  • Credits: 4
ITM 351 Bridging the Techology-Bus Gap ITM-351
  • Compare technical to non-technical staff in studying ways to build collaborative effectiveness for the business. Investigate sources of power from the local to global setting to better understand how power can be lost or gained within an organization. Empower each employee with defined outcomes and the right organizational fit. Utilize collaborative software tools to practice communicating virtually across diverse settings and maximize teamwork to deliver on business strategy.

  • Credits: 4
ITM 410 Bus Driven Info Systems & Sec ITM-410
  • Analyze how information systems are designed to interact with people and carry out business strategy. Analysis will include a study of enterprise-wide applications, coupled with a discussion of the infrastructure necessary to support these applications. Implications for security and privacy are key threads discussed throughout the module. Topics include business continuity and disaster recovery, virtualization, and the effects of compliance on infrastructure development (e.g. HIPPA, SOX, GLBA).

  • Credits: 4
ITM 325 Bus Mgmt for Information Tech ITM-325
  • Conduct an in-depth examination of the characteristics of a business and the circumstances that affect their success. Explore varying activities and styles of managers within organizations to develop an effective personal style for managing technology as a business-savvy professional. Study ways to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of application development and operations management teams. Topics include managing change, compliance, finances, marketing, business intelligence, and frameworks for technology service delivery such as the Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) and the Control Objectives for Information and related Technology (COBIT).

  • Credits: 4
ITM 421 Bus Strategy & Tech Innovation ITM-421
  • Examine strategies that businesses use to be competitive in the marketplace. Determine how tactical strategies for technology support the business strategy. Practice working in teams to develop techniques for innovation management of technologies.

  • Credits: 4
ITM 435 Business Ethics for Inf Tech ITM-435
  • The conduct of technical and business professionals is considered from a moral and ethical perspective. Students develop their capability and depth as a reflective practitioner by using a rich framework for processing ethical decisions. A rare opportunity is provided to prepare a personal moral and ethical statement as a foundation for future decision-making.

  • Credits: 4
ITM 310 Contemporary Issues in IT ITM-310
  • An introduction is given to the latest developments in information technology and its social and organizational impact. Included in the study of social issues are the effects, threats, and challenges to privacy and property. Organizational issues include effective communication for virtual teams, effects of information systems on communication, and the consequences of employee behavior and quality of work life.

  • Credits: 3
ITM 335 Data Management ITM-335
  • In this course you will learn to use business strategy to lay the foundation for managing data. You will learn the tools to model and create databases that minimize redundant, inaccurate data and provide faster access to strategic information. You will learn to identify the management and knowledge skills needed for enterprise data warehousing (a big reason for Wal-Mart's success!). At the end of this course, you will have expanded your toolset for improving organizational efficiency and for becoming a potential contributor to competitive advantage.

  • Credits: 4
ITM 425 Data Mgmt for Intelligent Bus ITM-425
  • Use business strategy and data-based applications as a foundation for making intelligent business decisions. Utilize a database tool to create a prototype for output that meets real-life business outcomes. Practice working individually and in teams to learn the normalization process, minimizing the potential for losing customers through redundant, inaccurate data. Study the Structured Query Language (SQL), data warehouse team-building, de-normalization, and data-mining for faster access to operational and strategic information leading to a potential competitive advantage.

  • Credits: 4
ITM 312 Harnessing Personal Innovation ITM-312
  • Utilize reflective tools and course feedback to examine individual strengths and opportunities for growth as a writer and communicator. Harness this self-awareness to develop a personalized strategic plan that clarifies each studentÕs unique ability to collaborate on teams and innovate for the organization. Begin comparing the effectiveness and efficiency of various electronic and face to face communication strategies amidst a contemporary exploration of technologyÕs global impact on business.

  • Credits: 4
ITM 305 Intro:Computer Based Info Syst ITM-305
  • Students will analyze how hardware, software, and people interact to help carry out a business strategy. This analysis will be built on a study of system's architecture used to support system-wide computer based applications such as Enterprise Resource Planning(ERP) and Customer Relationship Management (CRM).

  • Credits: 4
ITM 350 Managing People/Tech Env ITM-350
  • Students will study management tactics designed to focus on the talents and strengths of technical staff by empowering each employee with defined outcomes and the right organizational fit. Students will learn how to mobilize political support. The investigation will identify the sources of power, where power can be lost, and the resources needed to help get things done.

  • Credits: 3
ITM 430 Netwrk Infrastructure/Security ITM-430
  • In this course you will analyze network and security architecture for strategic value in a business context. You will create cost/benefit analyses to compare infrastructure options, analyze types of network attacks and design mitigation strategies, describe differing physical network media and topologies, examine privacy from an organizational and global perspective, and propose a network solution that helps to solve a day-to-day issue.

  • Credits: 3
ITM 405 Operations Mgmt in New Economy ITM-405
  • This course explores the functions of Information Technology (IT) Operations and the impact of operations management on a firm's competitiveness and management of IT resources. A strategic framework will be introduced identifying relationships between IT operations, project management and other value-chain functions that manage internal and external relationships amongst partners, vendors and outsourcers. Students will examine the need for speed and being first-to-market to positively leverage the network effect of new technologies in order to gain competitive advantage with technology-enabled products and services.

  • Credits: 3
ITM 315 Personal Resources:Assess/Appl ITM-315
  • Students investigate their histories, strengths, and weaknesses in order to understand how to best create and develop a personal and strategic plan for their future.

  • Credits: 3
ITM 342 Project & Lifecycle Mgmt ITM-342
  • Channel effective project management skills to innovate and deliver on business strategy. Utilize a project management simulation to study planning, scheduling, and tracking techniques for effective project management. Apply learning to a draft of the following deliverables for the studentÕs own Applied Research Project: 1) project scope/charter, 2) work breakdown structure, 3) cost-benefit analysis, 4) project schedule, 5) risk register, and 6) quality management plan. Identify the relationships between IT operations, project management and other value-chain functions that manage internal and external relationships among partners, vendors, and outsourcers. Explore the impact of operations management on a firmÕs competitiveness and management of IT resources.

  • Credits: 4
ITM 341 Project Mgmt & Innovation ITM-341
  • Students explore the methods used in managing projects and processes. Emphasis is placed on scheduling, tracking, and planning techniques as it relates to working with current and new technologies that require a significant amount of innovation. Computer tools for assisting project management tasks are discussed.

  • Credits: 4
ITM 330 Systems Analysis and Design ITM-330
  • An overview is given of the systems development life cycle with emphasis on techniques and tools of system documentation and logical system specifications. CASE methodologies are introduced as well as some advanced strategies and techniques of structured systems development.

  • Credits: 4
ITMC 380 ITIL¨ V3 Foundations ITMC-380
  • ITIL¨ (Information Technology Infrastructure Library) is the most widely accepted approach to IT Service Management in the world. ITIL¨ provides a cohesive framework drawn from the best practices of public and private sectors internationally. This course introduces students to the V3 service lifecycle phases and associated processes. The FoundationsÕ certification exam is administered at the end of the course.

  • Credits: 3
ITS 102 Foundations for Intl Students ITS-102
  • This course focuses on development of skills on living and learning in the United States.

  • Credits: 1

K

KHS 481 Adaptives KHS-4 81
  • Students study disorders, which limit student participation in physical education and the adapted development approach to a physical education program. Students will describe past and present legislation that has influenced programs for those with special needs, compare and contrast the major theories and models about movement activities, describe the abilities and limitations of the various degrees of visual, hearing impairment, learning disabled, emotional/behavioral disturbances, mentally disabled, speech and language impairments, awkwardness, brain injured and cerebral palsy, epilepsy and convulsive disorders, muscular dystrophy and other muscular disorders, orthopedic impairments, arthritis, heart disease, and asthma and other respiratory conditions. Students will also analyze the latest research in adaptive methodology and specific conditions, which require adaptive assistance in the physical education setting. (Preferred prerequisite: KHS473)

  • Credits: 2
KHS 482 Advanced Athletic Training KHS-482
  • This course is geared for the athletic training student pursing NATA certification or students further interest in knowledge of injury prevention and management. Advanced knowledge and techniques of athletic assessment, treatment/rehabilitation, administration of an athletic training programs and sports medicine experience outside of the classroom will be stressed. (Preferred prerequisite: KHS472)

  • Credits: 4
KHS 475 Applied Exercise Prescription KHS-475
  • This course integrates important principles and theories in exercise physiology, kinesiology, nutrition, psychology, and measurement, and then applies them to physical fitness testing and individualized exercise program design for team and individual athletes. Students will learn how to select physical fitness tests, conduct physiological assessments, and design individualized exercise programs and prescriptions. (Prerequisite: KHS 474 Exercise Physiology)

  • Credits: 4
KHS 300 Applied Nutrition KHS-300
  • The study of the interaction of humans with food. Nutritional concepts; current consumer issues in nutrition; nutritional needs through the life cycle; international nutritional concerns and issues are studied.

  • Credits: 4
KHS 472 Athltc Train,Injry Prevt&Safe KHS-472
  • The practical study of procedures for the care and prevention of injuries sustained during physical activity, including First Aid and Safety principles as dictated by the American Heart Association and the American Red Cross. Designed as a course for students pursuing careers in athletic training, teaching, coaching, physical therapy, or other related fields. Instruction will include lectures, informational presentations, and hands on experience. (Suggested prerequisite: KHS474)

  • Credits: 4
KHS 111 Badminton KHS-111
  • This course develops the fundamental skills, strategies and experiences to enjoy the sport of badminton. Basic skills include serve, forehand, backhand, smash and drop shot. Strategies will be explored in singles and doubles. Understanding the rules and scoring will add to the experience of the sport of badminton.

  • Credits: 1
KHS 106 Basketball Basics KHS-106
  • This course develops the fundamental skills, strategies and experiences to enjoy the sport of basketball.

  • Credits: 1
KHS 415 Biblical Christianity KHS-415
  • Students study selected Old and New Testament texts and explore the historical Biblical perspective of Christianity in the context of grace and the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Students learn how religious issues have been addressed and incorporated throughout different eras of history. Students learn how Christianity has shaped elements of management, how Biblical principles can shape individuals for strong leadership, and how to better understand Christians in the workplace within a Judeo-Christian culture.

  • Credits: 4
KHS 585 Biomechanics in Exerc. Science KHS-585
  • This course examines qualitative and quantitative elements and physics of human movement. Content areas include the structural mechanics of bone physiology, muscle mechanics, and connective tissue principles. Sport techniques and environmental conditions (e.g., friction, air, and water resistance) are also explored. Biomechanical implications of sport and fitness skill performance will be analyzed for mechanical efficiency and effectiveness.

  • Credits: 3
KHS 473 Biomechanics KHS-473
  • This course examines the physics of human movement. Content areas include the structural mechanics of bone construction, muscle contraction, ligament, and tendon plasticity and elasticity. Sport implement mechanics and the mechanics of environmental conditions (e.g. friction, air, and water resistance) are also explored. Sport performance issues will also be analyzed for mechanical efficiency. (Suggested prerequisite: KHS474)

  • Credits: 4
KHS 565 Capstone KHS-565
  • Students will complete an internship or a capstone project to complete the requirements for the Master of Arts in Sport Management program. KHS565 and KHS566 will complete the requirements for the capstone project.

  • Credits: 3
KHS 595 Clinical Exercise Assessment KHS-595
  • Students will learn how to select physical fitness tests, and conduct physiological assessments on members of diverse populations. Students will further study the procedures involved in screening individuals from diverse populations with varying levels of functional work capacity.

  • Credits: 3
KHS 479 Coaching Pedagogy KHS-479
  • This course offers some realistic guidelines and principles that should enable the coach to conduct his/her coaching program successfully. Course content explains the principles of coaching through discussion of the techniques that encompass the philosophical, psychological, and moral issues involved in the administration of athletic programs. (Prerequisite: KHS110)

  • Credits: 2
KHS 200 Community Safety & First Aid KHS-200
  • This course is designed to give students the fundamental skills and procedures necessary to identify ways to prevent injury and/or illness, recognize when an emergency has occurred, follow emergency action steps, and provide basic care for injury and/or sudden illness until professional medical help arrives.

  • Credits: 1
KHS 310 Drug Education KHS-310
  • Pharmacological and etiological foundations, schedules, classifications, theoretical approaches to dependency, addiction and tolerance together with intervention and prevention strategies are studied. This course is designed to provide students with applicable knowledge and role playing experience in the area of drug use and abuse. Students will develop a broad based knowledge of the various types of drugs and how they are being used today medically and on the street. The students will also be asked to participate in discussions designed to raise their awareness of drug use/abuse and assist them in developing the skills and habits necessary to refrain from the negative impacts of use/abuse.

  • Credits: 2
KHS 110 Dynamic Health & Human Movmt KHS-110
  • The aim of this course is to enhance and expand upon the personal and community benefits of a dynamic health and human movement lifestyle. Further, this course is designed to foster and promote healthy attitudes, behaviors, and skills, which develop informed healthful living and enlightened care for self. This course is designed to optimize informed healthful living, balanced service to God and humanity and enlightened care for self, such that Concordia University students are challenged to increase awareness, understanding, and informed critical appreciation for the six basic dimensions of health and wellness which are: Social, Mental, Emotional, Environmental, Spiritual, and Physical.

  • Credits: 3
KHS 330 Elementary Methods Block I KHS-330
  • This course is designed to give students the basic principles of effective instruction at the elementary school level. This course will address curriculum content, philosophy development, objective writing and annual/unit/daily lesson planning teaching skills, methods, class organization, progression of skills, and evaluation as it relates to creating an effective physical education program that promotes lifelong physical activity.

  • Credits: 4
KHS 575 Epidemiological Stat. Analysis KHS-575
  • This course examines the various research methodologies used in exercise science. It provides an overview of quantitative and qualitative research methodologies including research design, data collection and analysis, interviewing, case studies, and action science. The philosophy, ethics, and politics of research are introduced.

  • Credits: 3
KHS 445 Ethics & Decision Making H C KHS-445
  • This is a foundational course in ethics for individuals pursuing vocations of service in health care. Students will have a greater understanding of the ethical principles that are applied to the delivery of health care services and the processes for making sound ethical decisions. Students will develop models of decision making that are consistent with core personal values as well as the ethical standards of their professions. Motivations for ethical healthcare decisions will be evaluated. The roles and responsibilities of healthcare professionals will be explored on the basis of Christian values as well as assumptions drawn from reason and societal norms and expectations.

  • Credits: 4
KHS 545 Ethics & Policy in Sport Mgmt KHS-545
  • This course explores the topics of ethics and policy for administrators in a sport management setting. Students will critically analyze ethical concepts which influence the development of sport policies. The course will further examine the relevance of ethical considerations in policy development and compliance. Students will use contemporary case studies to examine ethical dilemmas relating to policy enforcement.

  • Credits: 3
KHS 570 Ethics & Policy Sport & Exerc KHS-570
  • This course explores the topics of ethics and policy for exercise science professionals in a sport and exercise setting. Students will critically analyze ethical concepts, which influence the development of necessary policies. The course will further examine the relevance of ethical considerations in policy development and compliance. Students will use contemporary case studies to examine ethical dilemmas relating to policy enforcement within the exercise science industry.

  • Credits: 3
KHS 474 Exercise Physiology KHS-474
  • The physiological basis for human performance and the effects of physical activity on the body's functions are examined in theory and application. Representative experiences include lecture, discussion, group exercises, class teaching, and written projects. (Preferred prerequisite: KHS110)

  • Credits: 4
KHS 600 Exercise Physiology KHS-600
  • The physiological responses to exercise performance and the effects of physical activity on the bodyÕs functions are examined in theory and application.

  • Credits: 3
KHS 615 Exercise Prescription KHS-615
  • This course focuses upon the design of individualized exercise programs and prescriptions in health and disease. Knowledge of skills necessary for safe and effective application of these prescriptions for members of diverse populations as well as the prevention and maintenance of chronic disease will be emphasized.

  • Credits: 3
KHS 116 Fitness Experience KHS-116
  • This course offers students the opportunity to experience fitness courses at a local fitness center.

  • Credits: 1
KHS 500 Foundations of Sports Mgmt KHS-500
  • Today the need for sport management professionals is increasing in areas of business, marketing, sales and managing. This course will examine the expanding field of Sport Management. Areas of emphasize include; exploring job specific skills pertaining to sport marketing and sales, facility management, event planning, sport agents and recruiting services, intercollegiate athletics, professional sport, public relations.

  • Credits: 3
KHS 311 Functional Anatomy KHS-311
  • This course employs a regional approach to human anatomy and emphasizes the role of the musculoskeletal system in producing movement. Elements of the nervous, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems are also considered. Kinematic features of common athletic movements are explored.

  • Credits: 4
KHS 107 Golf KHS-107
  • This course develops the fundamental skills, strategies and experiences to enjoy the sport of golf.

  • Credits: 1
KHS 470 Health Education for Teachers KHS-470
  • This course investigates personal and community health issues facing society and especially children. The National Health Education Standards and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Priority Health Risk Behaviors are addressed. (Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program)

  • Credits: 2
KHS 410 Health Methods and Strategies KHS-410
  • Health Methods and Strategies is designed to help learners identify and practice effective methods of facilitating K-12 health education. Observations of teaching of health lessons in elementary, middle school and secondary school settings are included in the requirements. Learners will explore and assess various educational resources from medical, insurance, health agency, business and private organizations that effectively could be used with K-12 learners. This will include development of a professional telecommunications resource database. Learners will learn strategies for effectively using and evaluating telecommunications and interactive multimedia for K-12 health education. (Prerequisites: ED336, ED470)

  • Credits: 3
KHS 400 Health Psychology KHS-400
  • KHS400 Health Psychology is designed to help students learn those skills necessary in forging a bridge between the client-learner's thoughts, feelings and actions by integrating thought and behavior into one synergistic approach to the delivery of health education that can accommodate the whole person. Cognitive techniques, such as lecture discussion, readings, presentations, collection of data, and specific planning combined with the behavioral components of emotion and action will help in bringing about this synergistic process.

  • Credits: 4
KHS 115 Hlth & Human Movement for Prof KHS-115
  • This course conveys the personal and community benefits of a dynamic health and human movement lifestyle by increasing awareness, understanding, and informed critical appreciation for the six basic dimensions of health and wellness: social, mental, emotional, environmental, spiritual, and physical. Through personal assessment and participation in physical activity, students are expected to foster and promote healthy attitudes, behaviors, and skills, which develop informed healthful living and enlightened care for self. This course also acquaints students with the National Health Education Standards and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Priority Health Risk Behaviors. Current personal and community health issues and challenges facing society and today's students will be explored. Upon completion of the course, students will be certified in Adult, Child, & Infant CPR and First Aid. (This course meets the Minnesota State Board of Teaching Drug Education and Health Standards).

  • Credits: 3
KHS 320 Human Life Experience KHS-320
  • This is a survey course designed to enable students to understand the biological, physiological, psychological, social, and cultural aspects of sexuality and human sexual behavior. Students will approach much of the material from a variety of different learning strategies including, research, games, small and large groups discussions, guest speakers, group activities, small assignments/worksheets, etc.

  • Credits: 3
KHS 510 Human Resource Management KHS-510
  • Discusses critical aspects of human resource management as it relates to sport organizations. An overview is given of major functions and concepts regarding the management and administration of human resources in the organization including: recruitment, development, motivation, compensation, benefits administration, employee relations, and human resource information systems

  • Credits: 3
KHS 125 Introduction to Kinesiology KHS-125
  • This course provides an introduction to the sub-disciplines of the field of Kinesiology. At the conclusion of the course, students will have an understanding of the various sub-disciplines of Kinesiology and the current issues present in these sub-disciplines, and be award of available employment and graduate school opportunities.

  • Credits: 1
KHS 105 Introduction to Social Dance KHS-105
  • This course will present popular social dances, basic steps as well as advanced variations. Typical dances presented include; Ballroom waltz, Old time waltz, Fox Trot, Rumba, and Swing. Additional dances will be covered as time permits.

  • Credits: 1
KHS 113 Kickboxing KHS-113
  • This is an introductory activity course developed for those who enjoy kickboxing, boxing, and Brazilian Jiu Jitzu ground wrestling. Using multiple styles of self-defense, this course covers a variety of concepts and practices to help reduce the risk of bodily harm when faced with various levels of confrontation.

  • Credits: 1
KHS 401 Kines Teach/Resrch Assist KHS-401
  • This assistantship is an on-campus experience teaching/research working under a faculty/staff member who has expertise in the area of interest to the student.

  • Credits: 4
KHS 498 Kinesiology Internship KHS-498
  • This internship places students directly in a setting where students learn to apply entry-level competencies. The student and advisor collaborate with the on-site supervisor in selecting an appropriate internship site that meets the need of the student, the needs of the internship site and the program needs. (Prerequisites: senior status and advisor approval)

  • Credits: 1
KHS 391 Law & Sport KHS-391
  • This course is an overview of legal aspects relevant to managers in the sport and recreation environment. Areas of study include tort law, contract law, constitutional law, legislation and administrative law related to the operation and administration of sport, recreation and athletic programs. Risk management strategies and sport management applications of legal issues are also addressed.

  • Credits: 4
KHS 540 Legal Aspects of Sports KHS-540
  • Legal Aspects of Sports is an overview of legal aspects that will be relevant to sport managers in areas of recreation, athletics, facilities, and business. The course will examine risk management strategies along with law related to operation and administration of sport-related programs. Students will explore case studies relating to the legal aspects of sports.

  • Credits: 3
KHS 515 Management and Leadership KHS-515
  • Different theories of leadership and management styles are introduced and what their impact is on organizational structure, productivity, and decision making. Students will examine their individual management and leadership styles as they relate to sport management administration. This course will analyze how leadership is not only different from management but also more effective in today's workplace.

  • Credits: 3
KHS 520 Managerial Finance KHS-520
  • The practical aspects of the strategic and operational roles of accounting and finance are explored, including applications of strategic planning, budgeting, financial performance, and fiscal and ethical responsibility in a sport management setting.

  • Credits: 3
KHS 525 Managing/Plng Sport Facilities KHS-525
  • This course takes a multi-disciplinary approach to the theories and practices of facility design, construction, and operations. The course will examine a wide variety of both indoor and outdoor sports facilities including stadiums, gymnasiums, golf courses, fitness centers, and athletic fields. Students will also examine event management and programming within the context of stadium and arena management.

  • Credits: 3
KHS 620 Master’s Capstone KHS-620
  • The capstone option provides the exercise science professional with the opportunity to synthesize the learning, which has taken place throughout the program. It further focuses upon the practical application of knowledge within the exercise science industry. The capstone will serve as an assessment of student learning within the Master of Science in Exercise Science program.

  • Credits: 3
KHS 625 Master’s Thesis KHS-625
  • The thesis provides the exercise science professional with the opportunity to synthesize the learning, which has taken place throughout the program, and to apply research principles to current exercise science topics. The thesis will serve as an assessment of student learning within the Master of Science in Exercise Science program.

  • Credits: 6
KHS 580 Mech Skilled Neuromusc Behv KHS-580
  • This course examines the integration of thought processes with the human body to produce skilled motor performance. Theoretical perspectives and mechanisms of motor behavior are examined and applied to significant systems involving gross motor learning and control in sport and exercise.

  • Credits: 3
KHS 315 Media and Sport KHS-315
  • This course will cover the most current trends and issues in the world of media as it affects sport. Students will explore and develop a critical knowledge and appreciation for the media as they relate issues to and of sport.

  • Credits: 3
KHS 335 Mid School/Sec Meth Block II KHS-335
  • This course is designed to give students the basic principles of effective instruction at the middle/secondary school level. This course will address curriculum content, philosophy development, objective writing and annual/unit/daily lesson planning, teaching skills, methods, class organization, progression of skills, and evaluation as it relates to creating an effective physical education program that promotes lifelong physical activity. Testing and measurement are covered in greater detail during this course. (Prerequisite KHS330)

  • Credits: 4
KHS 392 Mktg & Fundraising in Sports KHS-392
  • Sport marketing and fundraising presents an overview of the various techniques and strategies used in meeting the and needs of consumers in the sport industry as well as understanding how sport can be used to assist in the marketing of other companies and products. Areas to be addressed are the uniqueness of sport marketing, an overview of the segments of the sport industry, the importance of market research and segmentation in identifying the right sport consumer, the use of date-based marketing in researching the sport consumer the overview of the marketing mix as individual units and the relationship between those units, and the development and endorsement packages.

  • Credits: 4
KHS 436 Motor Dev,Contrl & Motor Learn KHS-436
  • This course examines the growth and development patterns of the child from infant, adolescence, adulthood, and through late adulthood. The purpose of the course is to enhance student insight into the fundamental role that the motor system plays in the human condition. There are four broad topic areas: 1) nature and mechanisms of the expression and control of motor behavior; 2) concepts, principles and measurement of motor learning; 3) factors that influence skill and proficiency in motor performance; and 4) practical approaches to studying and learning motor skills. Content will follow motor control through motor development across the life span with special emphasis on early childhood development and late adulthood.

  • Credits: 4
KHS 605 Nutrition and Metabolism KHS-605
  • This course focuses on the integration of nutrition with molecular and cellular biochemistry of metabolism. Major topics discussed in this course include the metabolic effects of diet composition, the interactions of macronutrients, and dietary modifications and their associated impact upon performance.

  • Credits: 3
KHS 505 Organizational Ldrshp & Dev KHS-505
  • This course is a scholarly consideration of the concepts, principles and analytical tools for effective administration in sport management. Students will examine how leaders develop themselves and others in a dynamic, changing environment. The course will also examine the topics of communication and conflict management as they relate to successful organizational outcomes

  • Credits: 3
KHS 438 Philosophy Values and Ethics KHS-438
  • This class will look at processes and strategies for dealing with ethical dilemmas and situations. Students will work on case studies and look at their own roots in developing their ethical positions. Students will wrap up the program and this class with their own statement of ethical beliefs

  • Credits: 3
KHS 439 Physical Dimensions of Aging KHS-439
  • This course is designed to provide students interested in the gerontology population the knowledge base of physical aging. Physical aging is central to most daily activities and permeates through all aspects of life. Throughout this class, students will study the biomechanical, physiological, and motor effects associated with aging. Students will understand that when society encourages older individuals to stop being active, professions should be encouraging activity, while understanding their physical abilities.

  • Credits: 3
KHS 201 Pilates Certification KHS-201
  • Intensive Mat-Plus (IMP) Certification Course: This course is intended to build on our studentsÕ general fitness and exercise science industry knowledge with classroom instruction and hands-on training specific to STOTT Pilates Mat work.

  • Credits: 6
KHS 114 Pilates KHS-114
  • This course provides students with a basic understanding of the Pilates method, and how to properly perform a wide variety of introductory mat exercises. These exercises will focus on applying the fundamental skills of Pilates, including breathing technique, focus and body alignment. As students' progress through exercises they will gain awareness of the mind-body relationship, and the many benefits Pilates offers.

  • Credits: 1
KHS 393 Planning & Managing Sport Fac KHS-393
  • This course helps students understand how to plan, design, and maintain sport facilities. In addition, event management and programming will be examined within the context of stadium and arena management.

  • Credits: 4
KHS 420 Program Administration KHS-420
  • Organization of health science education and physical education programs in schools, work sites, medical care settings, community, private and public settings is studied together with needs assessment and evaluation strategies. Emphases on management, assessment, planning of health promotion enhance such study. This course is designed to give students a broad based exposure to the many organizational and administrative duties that accompany Physical Education, Sport, and various Health Program Management. We will start by looking to understand the characteristics of an effective leader and the ability to tap into those characteristics with the people one works with.

  • Credits: 2
KHS 316 Psych of Sport Injury & Rehab KHS-316
  • Psychological factors related to sport injury and rehabilitation are examined. Special attention is given to the antecedents to injury, the stress-injury relationship, emotional responses to injury and rehabilitation, and the role psychological skills such as mental imagery, relaxation, goal setting, positive self-talk, and social support has on injury risk and recovery. Ethical issues for professionals and psychological considerations for malingering individuals are also examined.

  • Credits: 4
KHS 590 Psychology of Sport & Exercise KHS-590
  • Psychology of sport and its applications for performance enhancement are examined. Special attention is given to theory and techniques for developing and refining psychological skills to enhance performance in the exercise science industry. Psychological aspects of exercise-related injury will also be explored within this course.

  • Credits: 3
KHS 108 Racquetball KHS-108
  • This course develops the fundamental skills, strategies and experiences to enjoy the sport of racquetball.

  • Credits: 1
KHS 530 Research Design Methods KHS-530
  • This course examines the various research methodologies used in organizational settings. It provides an overview of quantitative and qualitative research methodologies including research design, data collection and analysis, interviewing, case studies, and action science. The philosophy, ethics, and politics of management research are introduced.

  • Credits: 3
KHS 220 Research Methods KHS-220
  • This course is designed to expose students to the principles and concepts necessary for understanding the basic elements of research in kinesiology and allied health. Students will learn about the research process, types of measurement and research, and proper writing style. Emphasis will also be placed on locating and evaluating credible evidence from various sources. Concepts from this course will assist students in applying research methods to topics within their own fields of interest.

  • Credits: 4
KHS 610 Research Methods KHS-610
  • This course examines the various research methodologies used in exercise science. It provides an overview of quantitative and qualitative research methodologies including research design, data collection and analysis, interviewing, case studies, and action science. The philosophy, ethics, and politics of research are introduced.

  • Credits: 3
KHS 490 Senior Professional Seminar KHS-490
  • This capstone course prepares students to chart different paths following graduation with a degree in Kinesiology or physical education: (a) entering the work force in the field of Kinesiology at a bachelor's degree level, (b) enter the work force in the field of teacher education at a bachelor's degree level, or (c) enter a graduate school. In this course student will develop a resume, request letters of recommendation, complete a professional portfolio, and identify job-searching strategies. (Prerequisite: senior status)

  • Credits: 1
KHS 375 Sociology of Sport & Exercise KHS-375
  • This course is designed to provide the student with a working knowledge about a number of topics regarding the sociological aspects of sport and physical activity. This course engages the students on the impact of sport and exercise in our lives and to make them aware of the social processes which either influence the institution of sport or are influenced by the institution of sport. Concepts covered will include: sport and exercise within and among societies and nations, social organizations, economics, education, the family unit, governments, religions, social differentiation (e.g., status, ethnicity, gender, age, careers, ethical), and social problems (e.g., honesty and violence).

  • Credits: 4
KHS 390 Sport Management KHS-390
  • Sport Management theories and practices will be examined using a multi-disciplinary approach. Topic areas to be examined include: organization and management, marketing and promotion, special event management, facility management and design, management forecasting, and career opportunities.

  • Credits: 4
KHS 435 Sport Psychology KHS-435
  • Psychology of sport and its applications for performance enhancement are examined. Special attention is given to theory and techniques for developing and refining psychological skills to enhance performance and personal growth. Content examines personality traits, anxiety, aggression vs. assertion, motivation, and other individual and group variables. (Suggested prerequisite: PSY101)

  • Credits: 4
KHS 550 Sport Sales KHS-550
  • Sales is an essential revenue producing function for any commercial organization. Sport and recreations have a unique marketing relationship of product and inventory with the consumer and marketplace. The course is designed for the student to learn the theoretical concepts and the application of skills and practices associated with the sports sales process. Through readings and lectures, the course will examine the rationale regarding the benefits and disadvantages of various sales and promotional methodologies. This course will then concentrate on promotional and sales strategies, campaigns, and techniques.

  • Credits: 3
KHS 394 Sports Business KHS-394
  • This course will include a comprehensive analysis of issues related to sports business. Topics will include finance, accounting and budgeting as it relates to the world of sports business.

  • Credits: 4
KHS 535 Sports Marketing KHS-535
  • This course will examine the application of marketing principles in the sport industry. Elements of corporate partnerships related to sport marketing will also be explored along with business strategies of sponsorships, branding, promotions, and event marketing.

  • Credits: 3
KHS 103 Strength & Conditioning Act KHS-103
  • This course develops the fundamental skills, strategies and experiences in fitness activities such as weight training and cardiovascular conditioning.

  • Credits: 1
KHS 102 Team Sport Activities KHS-102
  • This course develops the fundamental skills, strategies and experiences in team activities such as soccer, volleyball, and basketball.

  • Credits: 1
KHS 250 Technology, Media & Your Envir KHS-250
  • This course is designed to provide students with knowledge of technological advancements in health, the influence of the media on health, and a look into how our environment affects our health. Students will be asked to conduct research into all three topics, analyzing data, summarizing findings, and developing opinion statements concerning all three areas. Class discussion and participation is essential to student success in this course. (Prerequisite: KHS110)

  • Credits: 2
KHS 109 Volleyball KHS-109
  • This course develops the fundamental skills, strategies and experiences to enjoy the sport of volleyball.

  • Credits: 1
KHS 100 Walking and Running Basics KHS-100
  • This course develops the fundamental skills, strategies and experiences to enjoy the health benefits of walking and running.

  • Credits: 1
KHS 308 Women’s Health:Today & Future KHS-308
  • This course focuses on the diversity of women while reviewing dimensions of their general health. A history of women's health will be studied along with factors that have influenced the health care of women.

  • Credits: 3
KHS 305 Youth Sports KHS-305
  • This course will cover the role of sports on the lives of young people in society. Students will be engaged in learning what was and what currently is youth sports today. Topics also covered include youth development, gender, class inequities, and inter-group relations.

  • Credits: 3

L

LAW 411 Federal Income Tax LAW-411
  • This course studies the application of the law of federal income tax to individuals. Both procedural and substantive tax laws are examined. The policy behind the applicable code provisions is explored. Students extensively research a variety of tax problems.

  • Credits: 4
LAW 401 Legal Environment of Business LAW-401
  • This course examines the administrative and common law regulation of business. Constitutional Law, Title VII and product liability are covered. Students also examine contract law and the Uniform Commercial Code provisions on sales and secured transactions.

  • Credits: 2
LDR 210 Behavior Profiles in Leadershi LDR-210
  • This class discusses the language of personal style - how people do what they do. The DISC report a personality profile is the core piece of this class as participants learn more about their own behaviors and then the how to adapt to others piece. Students will be introduced to the different styles of communication and be able to apply the concepts to their individual situations.

  • Credits: 3
LDR 250 Leadership for Child Care Prof LDR-250
  • Concepts that are presented in this course will provide the leader with tools to develop best leadership practices that support an effective and motivated staff.

  • Credits: 4
LDR 205 Motivational Management LDR-205
  • Students will use personalized PIAV (Personal Interests, Attitudes, & Motivators) reports to learn ÒwhyÓ we make the decisions we make, why conflicts happen, and perhaps most importantly come to realize why diverse people view the world so differently. The overall focus is on understanding which attitudes drive your life, actions, and decisions. Students will also examine how rewards and recognition can be most effectively used when an individualÕs motivators are taken into account. It's recommended, but not required, for students to take Behavioral Profiles in Leadership first.

  • Credits: 3
LDR 280 Servant Leader as Ldrshp Style LDR-280
  • This class discusses the leadership styles formulated by Robert Greenleaf, called Servant Leadership. It discusses an organizational overview of the servant leadership as applied to organizations and the basic values and attributes of servant leadership.

  • Credits: 2
LDR 551 Strategic Leadership LDR-551
  • Effective leaders understand and leverage their leadership strengths to positively influence people and, in turn, an organization's success. This course will focus on learning your personal leadership style, how to positively impact others, and how to continue to grow and develop as a leader to bring out the best in yourself and others. Acknowledging the frequent challenge to Àrun government like business,À students will learn the strategies of successful private sector and government leaders.

  • Credits: 4
LDR 230 Synergistic Leadership LDR-230
  • Leadership begins with understanding the behavior and motivations of others. To do so, one must go beyond the surface advice of popular business books and review the psychology of individual behavior. This course, examines the writings of Abraham Maslow and the way in which successful leaders have utilized his concepts to create a workplace where the individual and the organization can strive for their best performance.

  • Credits: 2
LECE 340 Criminal Investigation LECE-340
  • This is a course on criminal investigation. The student will learn how a criminal thinks. The student will learn how to systematically investigate a crime, and what solves cases. Students will also learn how to develop a psychological profile based on reading the crime scene. The student will earn how to investigate the crimes of homicide, serial murder, robbery, terrorism, sex crimes, and gangs.

  • Credits: 3
LIT 256 Comedy Writing LIT-256
  • Comedy Writing is difficult. Many think that funny people can automatically write funny. This is not true. Just like every other artistic medium, comedy writing is a craft. Students will learn how to apply this craft to various mediums.

  • Credits: 2
LIT 255 Flash Fiction: Rdg,Wrtg,Publ LIT-255
  • Flash Fiction has many names: Sudden Fiction, Flash Fiction, The Short-Short, The Prose Poem and Micro Fiction. While there is no agreed upon definition of what constitutes a work of Flash Fiction, everyone agrees that it's short. Sometimes they are as long as 1000 words, and sometimes they are much smaller. Ernest Hemmingway wrote one that was only 6 words long (For sale: Baby shoes, never worn). In this course, we will read, write and learn how to publish Flash Fiction.

  • Credits: 2
LIT 150 Humor & War in Lit: LIT-150
  • Kurt Vonnegut, who died in April 2007, was a prisoner of war in WWII; he survived the infamous firebombing of Dresden, in which more than 100,000 civilians were killed by Allied troops. Slaughterhouse-Five, a classic in American and anti-war literature, was inspired by that experience. Far from being a strict factual recounting of this event, this novel exhibits great amounts of humor, as well as time travel and little green aliens. We will explore this strange and darkly funny book by examining themes, characters, style, imagery, and its unique structure. Students will read the novel prior to class.

  • Credits: 1
LIT 215 Literary Depictions of France LIT-215
  • This course is designed as an academic component supporting the Continuing Studies study trip to France. Prior and during the trip to France students will gain an understanding of French culture and history through literature and various readings.

  • Credits: 2
LIT 250 Rdngs in Contemporay Fiction LIT-250
  • Students will discuss the themes, style, character, symbolism and images in contemporary novels.

  • Credits: 1
LIT 257 Reading & Wrtg Narrative Poem LIT-257
  • The narrative poem is the oldest form of poetry. This, though, doesnÕt mean itÕs stuffy. Contemporary narrative poetry is hip and edgy. This course will examine contemporary narrative poetry. Students will also learn how to write the narrative poem.

  • Credits: 2
LIT 300 Understanding Plagiarism LIT-300
  • This class will help you to avoid plagiarism in an academic context, while also discussing grey areas of plagiarism, including sampling in hip hop and Avant avant-garde writing and standards in different academic and professional fields. You will have fun writing and plagiarizing while also learning what is expected from your instructors and developing your own personal philosophy about when and whether plagiarism is acceptable.

  • Credits: 2
LSC 256 Amer Movies:Comedy Genre LSC-256
  • This course provides an introduction to a special type of Hollywood romantic screwball comedies in which opposites attract and at least one of the lovers is an unconventional or eccentric person. During two class sessions, students will watch two movies. Discussions and supplemental reading will help students understand how these books and movies are related to their historical periods and to other cinematic genres.

  • Credits: 2
LSC 257 American Movies: Horror Genre LSC-257
  • This course provides an introduction to Hollywood horror films, from Universal Studios productions of the 1930s to the slasher flicks of the 1980s, with special emphasis on the evolution of the vampire genre. During two class sessions, students will watch two movies. Classroom discussion and supplemental reading will help students understand how these movies are related to its historical periods and to other types of film and fiction.

  • Credits: 2
LSC 207 American Movies: Musical Genre LSC-207
  • This course provides an introduction to Hollywood musical genres, from the Universal Studios, MGM and Paramount. During two class sessions, students will watch two movies. Classroom discussion and supplemental reading will help students understand the evolution of the musical and are related to other films and to their historical and cultural contexts.

  • Credits: 2
LSC 255 American Movies:Crime Genre LSC-255
  • This course provides an introduction to Òfilm noirÓ Ñ dark, stylish movies about detectives uncovering corruption or criminals trying to get away with murder. During two class sessions, students will watch two movies. Discussions and supplemental reading will help students understand how these books and movies are related to their historical periods and to other cinematic genres.

  • Credits: 2
LSC 111 Basics of Golf I LSC-111
  • This course is a one-day, hands-on workshop that will introduce beginning golfers to the rules and etiquette of golf. Participants will receive instruction in the fundamentals of chipping and puttingÑkey elements to successful golf. Time will also be set aside for instruction in other golf fundamentals. Students will need to provide their own golf equipment. Instruction will be at a local golf facility.

  • Credits: 1
LSC 112 Basics of Golf II LSC-112
  • This course provides a one-day, hands-on workshop of continued instruction to help students perfect basic skills and better their golf game. Students will need to provide their own golf equipment. Instruction will be at a local golf facility.

  • Credits: 1
LSC 148 Business Etiquette LSC-148
  • Business etiquette can play a large role in career success. This course will cover basics of networking and etiquette that will help you feel more comfortable in social and work situations. Content in this course includes networking guidelines, written communications, oral communications, manners, meals and more. This class also includes a luncheon event on campus where you can practice your new-found skills.

  • Credits: 2
LSC 600 Capstone Completion LSC-600
  • This course will allow you to use your existing capstone drafts, add to and modify as needed, and create 3 shorter papers to be submitted as the final work required for graduation from the School of Human Services, MasterÕs in Education.

  • Credits: 2
LSC 203 Constructing Life Exp Essays LSC-203
  • This course teaches students how to construct Life Experience Essays, essays that demonstrate significant real-life learning at a college-equivalent level and may earn college course credit. This course emphasizes understanding and use of the Kolb Model of Experiential Learning. Students will complete guided practice activities utilizing each of the four stages of the Kolb Model. Students will also learn how to identify significant learning experiences, categorize their life experience within general college course areas, and evaluate their learning for credit. Upon successful completion of this course, students will possess the necessary skills to write and submit Life Experience Essays for credit evaluation. This course teaches a model and a process with significant practice and feedback. This is not a writing course, so it is expected that students will have college-level writing skills and a basic understanding of APA formatting and citation. This course prepares students to write and submit Life Experience Essays, but submitting actual Life Experience Essays for additional credit is NOT part of this course.

  • Credits: 3
LSC 146 Creative Ldership: Comic books LSC-146
  • The course is intended to show the relationship between effective leadership qualities and comparing it to characteristics of leaders in comic books. Part of being an effective leader is how to be creative. The course focuses on how to see peoplesÕ skill

  • Credits: 2
LSC 274 Eff Strategies/Comm Success LSC-274
  • Professionals bringing the most success to their function and to their organization will possess a broad and rich skill set. Nothing is more important to organizations than having professionals who understand how to handle relationship needs. Students will gain insight on how to manage relationships through effective communication tactics. Identify your preferred thinking style and discover effective strategies that enhance relationships, communication effectiveness and team collaboration. This highly interactive course utilizes a powerful tool and theory for diagnosing, planning, and enhancing communication with people in the workplace. Explore effective communication strategies that help strengthen relationships across teams and departments.

  • Credits: 2
LSC 219 Electronic Money Management LSC-219
  • This course is designed to help participants with the practical applications of electronic money management. Topics include e-credit cards, digital signatures, electronic banking and billing, electronic payment, identity theft, counterfeit risks and consumer safety practices.

  • Credits: 2
LSC 268 Exploring World/Global Studies LSC-268
  • This course on global study provides participants the opportunity to explore different countries while experiencing various aspects of the culture, history, architecture, literature and the traditions of the regions visited. Travelers will prepare with a course of study in history, and events and literature prior to departing, in addition to on-going instruction during the tour. Additional assignments will be completed after returning from the trip.

  • Credits: 2
LSC 241 Families in Film LSC-241
  • This course will explore concepts of family and family dynamics in film. By using examples from modern day cinema, family issues including chemical dependency, grief and loss, end of life issues, multicultural families, and blended families will be examined in depth. Learning will be based on family theoretical frameworks including family systems theory, family development theory, feminist theory and social constructionism with a focus on multicultural families. Concepts such as boundaries, rules, triangulation, communication styles, conflict, family secrets, and gender roles will be addressed. The myths and realities of family, as portrayed on the silver screen, will be explored through example and discussion. In addition, the notion of film as a reflection of society will be discussed in terms of the social construction of family and the role of the media in this construction. As a final project, students will have the opportunity to do their own analysis of family dynamics in a film of their choice.

  • Credits: 2
LSC 147 Fund of Public Relations LSC-147
  • Public relations is an effective marketing tactic for any organization. In this course you will learn the basics about public relations and how to design a public relations program. Content in this course includes identifying audiences, creating key messages, developing a media contact list, writing press releases, using wire services and more.

  • Credits: 2
LSC 142 Hist Rock & Roll: 1970 – Pres LSC-142
  • This course takes up the history of Rock toward the end of what most historians consider its Golden Age. From the emergence of ÀprogressiveÀ Rock in the early `70s, we will trace the course of Rock and related styles to the present day, considering ÀarenaÀ Rock, punk, new wave, heavy metal, rap, grunge, and a range of ÀalternativeÀ styles.

  • Credits: 2
LSC 141 History of Rock & Roll to 1970 LSC-141
  • This course takes up the history of Rock from the beginning and will examine its history from its clear pre-origins in the 19th Century, through the first great maturation of Rock music around 1970; the era in which this music transformed from an artifact of youth culture into an art form, and beyond.

  • Credits: 2
LSC 265 Innovation:A Methodical Review LSC-265
  • Futurism is the methodical study of the future. The participants of this course examine differing views of the future, both optimistic and pessimistic, and learn how to systematically study the trends and patterns leading to the future.

  • Credits: 2
LSC 131 Introduction to Ceramics LSC-131
  • Students will be introduced to basic hand building techniques in forming clay objects. As well, students will learn to Design a tile, hand-carve a plaster tile press-mold, and produce multiple tiles from their mold. Students will be introduced to basic underglazing and glazing and will produce finished ceramic work, including tiles. 12 hours (minimum) will be required outside of class to complete assigned projects. Weekday afternoon/evening clay studio access for required individual projects. $20 studio fee (includes firings, materials). All tools/equipment supplied by Concordia Ceramics.

  • Credits: 2
LSC 134 Land of Luther & Bach-Germany LSC-134
  • The trip will include Wittenberg, Leipzig, Erfurt, Eisenach, Dresden and Prague and a study of life and times of Martin Luther.

  • Credits: 2
LSC 273 Lev/Max Strength in Wrkplace LSC-273
  • The nations highly-diversified workforce is requiring leaders to fully leverage all relevant talents in each individual within the organization. Students will identify strengths and learn how to maximize unique qualities and abilities in the workplace. Discover the drive and dedication to engage the diverse qualities and abilities of others which helps to create the optimal work environment. This highly interactive course will provide effective tools and theory on how to leverage one's own contributions and strengths in the workplace as well as those of others.

  • Credits: 2
LSC 117 Nutrition and Wellness: LSC-117
  • Learn natural ways to help cope with stressors. What foods and nutritionals will help calm the brain and increase memory retention. We will discuss the typical ÔAmerican Diet', expose hidden dangers and provide healthier alternatives.

  • Credits: 2
LSC 118 Nutritional Wellness: Stress LSC-118
  • Learn natural ways to help cope with stressors. What foods and nutritionals will help calm the brain and increase memory retention. We will discuss the typical `American Diet', expose hidden dangers and provide healthier alternatives.

  • Credits: 2
LSC 267 Peer Group Facilitation Traing LSC-267
  • In this course students learn the skills, techniques, and attitudes that will enable them to facilitate, and/or support information groups, teams, or work groups. Students also learn effective techniques for delivering information, facilitating problem solving, and decision-making.

  • Credits: 2
LSC 158 Politics and Social Justice: LSC-158
  • Documentary films are powerful social tools which often reflect both the current state of affairs in a country as well as struggles for change in the future. In this course, we will look at the history of documentary and how this medium addresses various social justice issues, both from the past as well as the present, and how documentaries capture political tides of resistance and change.

  • Credits: 2
LSC 244 Preschool Fitness LSC-244
  • Beneficial exercise for young children covers so much more than gross motor skills. This course will detail the need for physical education at the preschool level. Learn how teaching healthy lifestyle habits through physical activity in children ages 3-5 can impact all aspects of development. Current health issues facing children will be discussed along with mental, behavioral, cognitive and social ramifications of inactivity. Current dietary habits will also be covered along with promoting better food choices in children this young. Students will discover why introducing exercise and healthy eating at this age sets the stage for future health and well-being.

  • Credits: 4
LSC 277 Reflection and Synthesis LSC-277
  • This course is designed for students to reflect upon what they have learned while completing their Associate of Arts degree. Students will examine how their personal strengths, personal limitations, academic goals, and career goals will integrate as they leave the program and begin new endeavors- academic or otherwise. (this course replaces Portfolio and Synthesis)

  • Credits: 2
LSC 280 The Business of Art LSC-280
  • Commercial or fine arts, if art is your career you need this course. Through readings, discussion, and chats with guest speakers this course will cover: legal and tax considerations, galleries and dealers, contract and commissions, business plans and everyday finances. Recommended for Graphic Arts majors.

  • Credits: 2
LSC 127 The Hiring Process LSC-127
  • This course will focus on identifying the key elements/attributes that employers are seeking during their interview process. During this highly interactive program, you will have the opportunity to learn how to better prepare yourself for interviews; how to distinguish yourself from the competition; what to include in your resume; and how to most effectively follow-up after the interview. Emphasis will be placed on defining your ÒidealÓ job criteria, researching potential companies that meet these criteria.

  • Credits: 2
LSC 159 The Inner Review LSC-159
  • In this reflective course students will evaluate their strengths as a learner; define priorities and goals when choosing a career; and gain a greater understanding of memory.

  • Credits: 2
LSC 129 Travel to Mexico LSC-129
  • This course is a global travel learning experience.

  • Credits: 2
LSC 116 Women’s Awareness Skills LSC-116
  • This is an entry level course that is appropriate for any woman that wishes to learn how to be aware and understand how to better protect herself in everyday life. The course goal is to prepare women to avoid/deal with a wide range of attacks that could happen to anyone. Concepts learned will include: awareness education, mindset development, and techniques for physical defense.

  • Credits: 2
LTN 111 Beginning Latin I LTN-111
  • Students begin their study of Latin vocabulary, grammar and syntax in order to read and comprehend Latin prose and poetry with appropriate assistance.

  • Credits: 4

M

MAN 435 Applied Ethics MAN-435
  • Students examine the issues of accountability in government and business regarding human rights and ethics through readings, classroom discussion and debates. Exploring both ethical theory and personal values, students develop a system for making ethical decisions on their personal, public and work lives.

  • Credits: 4
MAN 120 Basics of Business MAN-120
  • Students learn to make decisions in a dynamic business environment. Fundamental course concepts include developing a business plan, managing people and operations, and the basics of marketing, finance, and communications.

  • Credits: 2
MAN 201 Business Analytics MAN-201
  • In this course students will learn to use various tools to analyze data and make predictions. These tools include probability analysis, hypothesis testing, regression analysis, linear programming and tools for financial analysis. (Prerequisite: MAT110 - can be taken concurrently)

  • Credits: 2
MAN 401 Business Strategy and Ethics MAN-401
  • This course introduces the critical business skills of planning and managing strategic activities. Case studies are emphasized. Students learn an executive-level perspective on strategy formulation and implementation. Students also explore the divergent viewpoints one might hold in analyzing the ethical issues likely to confront business practitioners. This course is the capstone course in the Business Program. Therefore, students should take this course only during one of the last two semesters of their program. (Prerequisites: MAN301)

  • Credits: 4
MAN 101 Introduction to Business MAN-101
  • This is a survey course intended to give students an overview of accounting, economics, finance, management and marketing.

  • Credits: 4
MAN 450 Managing Finance & Bus. Strat. MAN-450
  • Students will apply business analytical tools in finance and accounting to real world business scenarios. Students will use popular business software, such as QuickBooks, to gain experience in implementing and managing small business finances. Through case studies and other techniques students will learn how to integrate their knowledge of business disciplines in developing business strategy which will include principles of stewardship and sustainability issues.

  • Credits: 4
MAN 350 Managing in a Global Economy MAN-350
  • This cross functional course will build on management principles and apply them to global opportunities using market measurement, competitive analysis, managing distribution, product positioning, ethics and decision-making, forecasting, budgeting, performance evaluation and maintaining control.

  • Credits: 4
MAN 410 Managing Talent, Change & Neg. MAN-410
  • The role of the human resource management function in organizations will be studied in this cross functional course. The changing nature of work and demographic shifts will be of particular emphasis. The course also will focus on increasing the understanding of the negotiating process and on increasing the skill level for negotiating by focusing on preparation, interest identification, strategies and tactics, listening skills, collaborative negotiations, competitive negotiations, and options outside of negotiation. Emphasis will be given to win/win collaborative negotiations and preserving relationships using principled dispute resolution strategies. (Prerequisite: MAN301)

  • Credits: 4
MAN 460 Managing Teams, Comm & Proj MAN-460
  • This course focuses on team building and team leadership utilizing communication, conflict management, and decision making skills. Project management techniques that will enhance success in leading and completing projects are also covered. Students will apply project management knowledge, tools and techniques to an actual team project. Topics include creating a project charter and plan, working as a project team, executing the project and closing out the project. This courses is for seniors only. (Prerequisite: MAN301)

  • Credits: 4
MAN 370 Non-profit Ldrshp and Mgmt MAN-370
  • Students critically examine theories and practices of non-profit leadership and management, such as building, developing, and working with governing boards, employees, volunteers, and community resource people. Students learn to maximize resources in the effective management of volunteers and program delivery while exploring decision making and ethical questions within non-profit organizations.

  • Credits: 4
MAN 302 Operations & Quality Mgmt MAN-302
  • This course will discuss the theoretical and practical foundations for operations management. The course will focus on the production process (including service), quality, and supply chain management. the production process includes the management of equipment and machinery, facilities, materials management, inventory control, scheduling, and lean operations. Quality includes quality control and quality management including six sigma. Supply chain management includes purchasing, vendor relations, and logistics. The concepts of project management are also reviewed.

  • Credits: 2
MAN 301 Organizational Behavior MAN-301
  • This course will examine the basic principles of management including planning, organizing, integrating, leading, decision-making, and evaluating performance. Using theories contributed from the behavioral sciences students will examine the behavior of individuals, groups and organizations. Students will learn to analyze problems and develop strategies to deal with organizational growth and change.

  • Credits: 4
MAR 313 Advertising and Promotions MAR-313
  • This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of integrated marketing communications through advertising, promotions, personal selling, public relations and internet marketing. Ethical issues related to these topics will be examined and trends in consumer and business-to-business buyer behaviors will be explored. (Prerequisite: MAR301)

  • Credits: 4
MAR 312 Consumer Behavior MAR-312
  • This course addresses the theoretical background for understanding consumer behavior. This course will examine the interaction between the environment, consumer's affect and cognition and a consumer's ultimate behavior. Various theories and perspectives on consumer motivation, attitude formation, information processing, and decision-making will be discussed throughout this course.

  • Credits: 4
MAR 311 Entrepreneurship MAR-311
  • This course will explore small business management and entrepreneurship.

  • Credits: 4
MAR 471 Global Marketing MAR-471
  • This course examines the complexities of international marketing. The scope and nature of international and global marketing operations are introduced. The influence of culture on global marketing is explored. The traditional elements of marketing, including price, product, promotion, distribution, and service are examined in the context of international markets. Students are asked to analyze what it takes to introduce a product into a foreign market. (Prerequisite: MAR301)

  • Credits: 2
MAR 413 Marketing Research MAR-413
  • This course will teach some of the fundamental tools needed to analyze the behavior and attitudes of all types of consumers. Students will acquire an overview of scientific methods and the research process. Skills learned will include learning how to identify problems, formulate problem definitions, define research objectives, choose and develop the research design, analyze data, and write up and present a report. Students will be taught several research techniques including survey, observation, focus groups, in-depth interviews, projective techniques, experimentation, and secondary data analysis. This course is for seniors only.(Prerequisites: MAR301)

  • Credits: 4
MAR 414 Marketing Strategy MAR-414
  • This is the senior marketing capstone course. In the class we will discuss how marketing strategy, tactics, theory and practice are integrated. Students will learn to apply strategic thinking through case analysis and through class facilitation and frequent participation. (Prerequisite: MAR301)

  • Credits: 4
MAR 301 Principles of Marketing MAR-301
  • This course provides an introduction to the study of marketing in business and other organizations. Topics that will be addressed in this course include the marketing environment, marketing ethics, information gathering, product development, pricing strategies, distribution strategies, the promotional mix, decision making, nonprofit marketing, social marketing and international marketing. (Prerequisite: junior standing)

  • Credits: 4
MAR 470 Social Media Marketing MAR-470
  • In this course, students will explore the latest tools and trends in social media applied to marketing, advertising, and communication. Using case studies from large corporations, small businesses, and non-profits, students will examine current examples and future opportunities of how marketing professionals use social networks, user-generated content, and blogs for shaping marketing activities.

  • Credits: 2
MAT 450 Abstract Algebra MAT-450
  • This course is a rigorous introduction to abstract algebra. Topics include mappings, groups, equivalence relations, isomorphisms, rings, and fields. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in MAT220)

  • Credits: 4
MAT 330 Advanced Prob & Stats MAT-330
  • This course is a Calculus-based look at Probability and Statistics. Assuming students have been exposed to the basics through an introductory course, this course will build upon that experience. Topics include an in depth investigations of probability, discrete and continuous random variables, parameter estimation, hypothesis testing, inference using the normal and binomial distributions, goodness of fit, regression and correlation, and ANOVA. The course will include a statistical software component. (Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in MAT145 and MAT110)

  • Credits: 4
MAT 103 Beginning Algebra MAT-103
  • This course is not a general education course and should only be taken by students planning to take a course with MAT103 listed as a prerequisite. Topics include calculator skills, combinatorics, linear equations and systems of linear equations, story problems, function notation, exponentials and logarithms. Students must earn a minimum grade of C- in this course to progress to the next level Math course. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in MAT095 or level 2 placement on the Math Placement Exam.)

  • Credits: 2
MAT 135 Calculus I MAT-135
  • This course explores the concepts of limit and continuity, investigates techniques of differentiation and its applications, introduces integration, and provides the framework for the Fundamental Theorem. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in MAT125 or level 5 placement on the Math Placement Exam.)

  • Credits: 4
MAT 145 Calculus II MAT-145
  • This course is a continuation of MAT135. Topics covered include techniques of integration, an introduction to differential equations, sequences and series and applications of these concepts. Other topics include parametric equations, polar equations, and conic sections. Students will be introduced to a computer algebra system. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in MAT135 or equivalent)

  • Credits: 5
MAT 255 Calculus III MAT-255
  • This course is a continuation of MAT145. Topics covered include analytic geometry in three-dimensional space, vector calculus, partial differentiation, multiple integration, the Fundamental Theorems, and related applications. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in MAT145)

  • Credits: 4
MAT 101 Contemporary Mathematics MAT-101
  • This course was designed to give the liberal arts student an experience in contemporary mathematics with emphasis on its connection to society. The concepts include financial mathematics, statistics, apportionment, voting, graphs and networks. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in MAT095 or level 2 or higher placement on the Math Placement Exam.)

  • Credits: 3
MAT 375 Diff Equations and Linear Algb MAT-375
  • This course is an overview of the concepts of differential equations and linear algebra necessary to solve applied problems. Topics include: Differential equations: separable, first-order linear, higher-order linear, linear systems with constant coefficients. Linear algebra: basis, dimension, matrices, eigenvalues/eigenvectors, and vector spaces. (Prerequisite: Minimum of C- in MAT145)

  • Credits: 4
MAT 220 Discrete Mathematics MAT-220
  • This course serves as an introduction to formal proofs and is prerequisite for several upper level math courses. Additional topics covered include logic, set theory, function and relations. (Prerequisite: C- or better in MAT135 or CSC175)

  • Credits: 3
MAT 200 Found of Elem Math MAT-200
  • This course gives students the mathematical foundation necessary to teach K-6 mathematics and to prepare for the Minnesota Teaching Licensure Basic Skills Exam. Topics include basic algebra, set theory, probability, statistics, geometry, and problem-solving techniques. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in MAT100 or MAT105 or level 4 placement on the Math Placement Exam.)

  • Credits: 3
MAT 460 Foundations of Analysis MAT-460
  • This course is a formal treatment of functions of a real variable. It covers the topology of the real line, sequences and series, and classic results in continuity, differentiation, and integration. (Prerequisite: Minimum of C- in MAT145 and MAT220)

  • Credits: 4
MAT 305 Foundations of Geometry MAT-305
  • This course provides a systematic survey of Euclidean, hyperbolic, transformation, and fractal geometries. Through the use of technology, the students are better enabled to construct, analyze, and prove conjectures. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in MAT220)

  • Credits: 3
MAT 488 Independent Study MAT-488
  • There are a plethora of topics in mathematics an advanced student could explore such as Difference Equations, Combinatorics, Graph Theory, Chaos Theory, Optimization, Operations Research, or Cryptography to name a few. The opened ended course number allows for more than one such experience. The student will work with a faculty mentor to choose an appropriate course, number of credits, and assessment scheme.

  • Credits: 0
MAT 105 Intermediate Algebra MAT-105
  • This course is not a general education course and should only be taken by students planning to take a course with MAT105 listed as a prerequisite. Topics include properties of exponents, polynomials, factoring, radicals, rational equations, and graphing functions. Students must earn a minimum grade of C- in this course to progress to the next level Math course. (Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C- in MAT103 or level 3 placement on the Math Placement Exam)

  • Credits: 2
MAT 110 Intro Probability & Statistics MAT-110
  • This course will explore fundamental topics from probability and descriptive and inferential statistics and apply these to a range of areas of study including business, social science, and biology. Topics include probability and counting rules, probability distributions, hypothesis testing, correlation, regression, chi-square, and analysis-of-variance. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in MAT100 or MAT103 or level 3 or higher placement on the Math Placement Exam.)

  • Credits: 3
MAT 498 Mathematics Internship MAT-498
  • An exemplary real-world experience which allows for a deeper understanding of the mathematics used in a student's field of interest.

  • Credits: 1
MAT 478 Mathematics Seminar MAT-478
  • Students in this seminar will explore a variety of exciting mathematics problems. The course will be offered every spring but the topic will vary depending on the interests of the faculty member and the students. Students will sharpen their mathematical abilities by exploring an assortment of problem-solving strategies and clearly presenting generalized solutions. The opened-ended course number allows for more than one such experience. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in MAT220 or consent of instructor)

  • Credits: 3
MAT 95 Mathematics Workshop MAT-095
  • This course is not a general education course and should only be taken by students planning to take a course with MAT095 listed as a prerequisite. The goal of this course is to strengthen basic math skills in preparation for future math courses. The course begins by reviewing operations with whole numbers, fractions, and signed numbers. The course builds to simplifying algebraic expressions, solving linear equations, and solving problems with percentages. Students must earn a minimum grade of C- in this course to progress to the next level Math course. (Course does not count for grad requirement of 128 credits.)

  • Credits: 2
MAT 125 Precalculus MAT-125
  • This course emphasizes functions and their applications. It starts with investigating graphs and solutions of the algebraic functions including polynomial, rational, and root functions. The course continues by exploring transcendental functions including exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. The course concludes with a study of conic sections. The course is a good preparation for Calculus and for those students who will encounter functions in their course of study. Students must earn a minimum grade of C- in this course to progress to the next level Math course. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in MAT100 or MAT105 or level 4 or higher placement on the Math Placement Exam )

  • Credits: 4
MAT 111 Principles Contemporary Math MAT-111
  • This course is designed to give the liberal arts student an experience in contemporary mathematics, with emphasis on its connection to society. The concepts include management science, statistics, coding, social choice and decision-making, and geometric shapes and symmetries.

  • Credits: 3
MAT 230 Probability and Statistics MAT-230
  • This is an introductory probability and statistics course designed primarily for math and science students with a Calculus background. Topics covered include descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression, and analysis of variance. (Prerequisite: MAT135)

  • Credits: 4
MBA 565 Analytics for Bus Intelligence MBA-565
  • This course deals with the process of acquiring, analyzing and interpreting primary and secondary marketing data needed for profitable marketing decisions. It considers recent developments in the use of internal and external data needed for marketing decisions. This course is intended to explore data mining techniques with the goals: 1) To provide the key methods of classification, prediction, reduction, and exploration that are at the heart of data mining; 2) To provide business decision-making context for these methods; 3) Using real business cases, to illustrate the application and interpretation of these methods.

  • Credits: 3
MBA 515 Applied Business Ethics MBA-515
  • This course will review and analyze popular models of ethical decision making. Readings, case studies, and special presenters will provide opportunities to investigate current ethical issues facing leaders and managers in business and organizational settings as well as critically apply various ethical theories and decision-making frameworks. Literature relative to Christian vocation, applied ethics, and value-centered leadership will be explored. Student papers and presentations will demonstrate the integration of a personal and vocational ethic.

  • Credits: 3
MBA 580 Bridging IT Bus Gap Glbl Set MBA-580
  • Compare technical to non-technical staff in studying ways to build collaborative effectiveness in managing functions and projects. Minimize the barriers to successful intercultural communication by investigating various tools for teamwork in local and global settings. Utilize project case studies and collaborative software tools to practice communicating virtually across diverse settings and maximize teamwork to deliver on business strategy.

  • Credits: 3
MBA 595 Bus Info Syst Sec, Risk, Qlty MBA-595
  • Analyze how information systems are designed to interact with people and carry out business strategy. Design plans to analyze and secure enterprise-wide data and applications in a growing mobile environment. Assess risk and manage quality in working to meet auditing and compliance standards. Topics include business continuity and disaster recovery, virtualization, and the effects of compliance on infrastructure development. Create first drafts of middle and final phases for the student's Management Application Portfolio (MAP).

  • Credits: 3
MBA 561 Customer Analysis MBA-561
  • This course explores the behavior of consumers and the factors that influence their behavior. Analysis of customer decision-making and how marketing strategy can be used to influence those decisions is examined through various theories, models and techniques that attempt to explain the behavior of the consumer. The framework is a buyer behavior model, in which concepts from psychology, sociology, and economics are applied to individual and organizational purchase decisions. The course will also explore consumer insights and shopper marketing to build revenue and grow the business. Marketing strategies of leading firms in consumer products, technology, and services (including internet services) are analyzed using a variety of formats including lecture-discussions, case studies designed to illustrate the salient issues as well as readings and texts.

  • Credits: 3
MBA 505 Global Economics MBA-505
  • The course will apply economic theory to develop a framework to analyze and predict trade, exchange rate, environmental, health, labor and other policies. Strategies will encompass the interaction of American and global economic institutions and policy making entities such as the United States Trade Representative, Congress, Federal Reserve, WTO, and the European Union.

  • Credits: 3
MBA 540 Health Care Bioethics MBA-540
  • Many hospitals have ethical boards to help with difficult decision making. This speaks to the increasing complexity of ethical issues which health care professionals face. This course will look at end-of-life issues, resource allocation issues, decision-making issues, access-to-care issues and other major ethical issues facing health care professionals. This course will explore briefly a Christian understanding of the grounds for ethical decision making.

  • Credits: 3
MBA 555 Health Care Informatics MBA-555
  • A call has come from the highest reaches of government for the computerization of all medical records. Information systems and the interlocking of these systems will be a major concern for health care providers in the years to come. Students will learn how to collect, massage, manipulate data in order to make it useful. There is plenty of useless data and information available; the real professional can mine that data and information into golden nuggets of knowledge.

  • Credits: 3
MBA 560 Health Care Strategic Leadrshp MBA-560
  • The distribution system for health care is complex and changing rapidly. The strategy process represents an essential opportunity for health care leaders to establish, implement and guide the organizations direction in these turbulent waters of changing distribution systems. MAP is a process in which students summarize, synthesize, and demonstrate knowledge, skills, and competencies as organizational managers and leaders. Students will draw from their MBA course work, career experiences, and synthesizing activities to build a portfolio.

  • Credits: 3
MBA 590 Info Syst Analysis & Comm MBA-590
  • Create a systemic understanding of business requirements by interviewing key stakeholders and diagramming to communicate process workflow. Utilize contemporary case studies to compare software and infrastructure development methodologies such as the Systems Development Lifecycle to Agile Methods. Apply learned skills to key decision-making tasks such as in-house development, outsourcing, software testing, and cloud computing. Create a first draft of the initial phases for the student's own Management Application Portfolio (MAP).

  • Credits: 3
MBA 520 Integrated Marketing Comm MBA-520
  • This course will develop marketing strategy and executing diverse communication tactics critical to all enterprises. Consistency in both processes and messages is important. Students will analyze business scenarios and determine strategic objectives, target markets and messages, as well as demonstrate to use and how to apply multiple marketing tactics.

  • Credits: 3
MBA 535 Legal Environment for Managers MBA-535
  • This course integrates the treatment of law and management. It helps managers and leaders spot legal issues before they become legal problems and emphasizes developing the legal astuteness to craft solutions that attain core organizational objectives without incurring undue legal risk. Traditional legal concepts are discussed as well as current topics in developing areas of the law. An emphasis on ethical concerns stimulates understanding of how managers must incorporate considerations of ethics and social responsibility into their managerial actions

  • Credits: 3
MBA 705 Managerial Appl Portfolio MBA-705
  • The MAP is a process in which students summarize, synthesize and demonstrate knowledge, skills, and competencies as organizational managers and leaders. Students will draw from their MBA course work, career experiences and synthesizing activities to build a customized professional portfolio.

  • Credits: 1
MBA 530 Managerial Finance and Acctg MBA-530
  • This course will examine the framework and systems of current accounting and finance principles including preparation of financial statements, accounting cycles and balance sheet classifications. Students will apply these principles along with ethical responsibility and critical thinking skills to management practices of business decision making and strategic planning.

  • Credits: 3
MBA 510 Managerial Res Meth & Design MBA-510
  • This course examines the various research methodologies used in organizational settings. It provides an overview of quantitative and qualitative methodologies including research design, data collection and analysis, interviewing, case studies, and action science. The philosophy, ethics, and politics of management research are introduced. Students will critique published research, write a literature review, and design research studies.

  • Credits: 3
MBA 570 Marketing Decision Models MBA-570
  • This course focuses on the benefits of using analytic and modeling-based approaches to marketing decision-making. It offers an applied approach to develop studentÕs ability to work on marketing data, and weigh alternate business decision options based on benefits and costs as well as construct models to aid managerial decisions determining business strategy. This course deals with the process of acquiring, analyzing and interpreting primary and secondary marketing data needed for profitable marketing decisions. Coursework is developed in strategic marketing, new product development, branding, marketing segmentation, sales and trade promotion analysis, pricing, and design of marketing mix, sales force allocation, direct, and internet marketing.

  • Credits: 3
MBA 575 Marketing Strategy Monetized MBA-575
  • This course focuses on the role of business strategy to create profitable customers by delivering superior value. Strategy becomes monetized during the implementation process which is critical to executing on successful consumer capitalism. This course will develop metrics and systems to utilize in the marketing activities to measure customer value and business return on investment. An outcome of this course is the ability to communicate the value of marketing strategies to executive management regarding ROI. In this course, a hybrid format of lecture-discussions and applied work issues will be incorporated to illustrate the marketing strategy outcomes.

  • Credits: 3
MBA 616 MBA Int’l Topics in OM MBA-616
  • This course will provide an overview of contemporary topics related to organization effectiveness as viewed from an international perspective. Students taking this course will participate in one of the international trips for graduate students sponsored by the College of Business and Organizational Leadership and led by one of the faculty. Based on information gathered from international corporate visits, students will be required to synthesize observation, theory, and research as they investigate a variety of organizational topics: talent management, organization learning, and strategy formation and implementation in an international business setting. Students will gain perspectives in identifying and investigating various aspects contributing to global competitive advantage.

  • Credits: 2
MBA 605 Operations & Technology Mgmt MBA-605
  • This course will examine value-chain functions such as product-process design, quality management, supply chain management and workforce management in order to understand the resource-based view of strategic advantage for the organization. Students will examine strategic management of operations utilizing to support the value-chain functions of operations management.

  • Credits: 3
MBA 500 Org Leadership and Dev MBA-500
  • This course introduces leadership in dynamic, changing organizations where customers change, technologies shift, and work processes evolve. In this course students will examine how leaders develop themselves and others and create alignment as an organization changes to meet the needs of the future

  • Credits: 3
MBA 585 Project and Lifecycle Mgmt MBA-585
  • Introduce the entire project lifecycle by practicing collaborative development of various project monitoring and reporting tools in a case-study setting: 1) project scope/charter, 2) work breakdown structure, 3) cost-benefit analysis, 4) communication plan, 5) project schedule, 6) risk register, and 7) quality management plan. Transfer learning objectives to the student's own Management Application Portfolio (MAP) by practicing knowledge retention and by applying concepts from the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK).

  • Credits: 3
MBA 545 Quality Practices MBA-545
  • In order to compete in this new economy, health care entities, particularly hospitals, need to employ quality practices. This course will examine current theory and practices for health care institutions: Six sigma, Lean and other processes and procedures. Students will understand how the quality system interweaves with customer service and happiness.

  • Credits: 3
MBA 700 Strat Ldrshp & Managerial App MBA-700
  • This course introduces students to the principal practices and theorists of contemporary strategic thinking. Students will focus on strategic analysis of their industry and the strategic practices of the organizations in that industry. The MAP is a process in which students summarize, synthesize and demonstrate knowledge, skills, and competencies as organizational managers and leaders. Students will draw from their MBA coursework, career experiences and synthesizing activities to build a portfolio.

  • Credits: 4
MBA 525 Strategic HR Management MBA-525
  • This course looks at human resources management from an operating manager's perspective and focuses on the key role strategic human resource management plays in the development and execution of organizational strategy. Emphasis will be placed on the cultural, behavioral, and the legal issues faced by companies as they attempt to compete in an increasingly expanding global economy. Students will work collaboratively to analyze and compare the complexities and challenges of doing business abroad as well as in the United States and discuss approaches, plans, and programs to address those issues strategically.

  • Credits: 3
MBA 620 Strategic Leadership MBA-620
  • This course introduces students to the principal practices and the theorists of contemporary strategic thinking. Students will understand how leaders have strategically created and affected organizational outcomes. After examining the elements of a strategic planning process, students apply those principles and focus on strategic analysis of their industry and the strategic practices of the organizations in that industry.

  • Credits: 3
MBA 610 Tools for Managerial Decision MBA-610
  • This course will focus on how managers think clearly and make effective decisions. Students will examine and apply several models of decision-making. Innovative, critical, emotional and futuristic thinking will be explored. The students will develop their own tools to become effective decision-makers.

  • Credits: 3
MBA 630 Topics in Global Management MBA-630
  • This course focuses on the opportunities and threats of the complex environment of international business, with an emphasis on the unique problems involved in managing international operations. Main topics include the relevance of the foreign economic, political, legal, and cultural environment, international market analysis, international human resource management, and import/export transactions.

  • Credits: 3
MIS 301 Technology & Project Mgmt. MIS-301
  • This course will focus on two major themes: managing technology in a business environment and tools, concepts and techniques in project management.

  • Credits: 4
MKC 360 Electronic Marketing MKC-360
  • Amazon.com? Anything.com? Electronic commerce has become a common part of society, and virtually anything can be bought or sold on the internet. This course examines how to strategically market items electronically.

  • Credits: 3
MKC 370 Global Marketing MKC-370
  • In the global economy, employees compete with other employees all over the world. Because of this expanded economy it is necessary to understand other parts of the world and how business is implemented. Students create marketing plans to market products to other countries.

  • Credits: 3
MKC 310 Innovative Marketing MKC-310
  • Innovation is essential; that's the rule of business for the new millennium. Students will learn about product development, entrepreneurship, and different types of innovation.

  • Credits: 3
MKC 200 Marketing Business to Business MKC-200
  • This course will analyze how to market and sell products or services to organizations in a Àbusiness to businessÀ (B2B) marketplace. Discussion will consist of various marketing and sales approaches to achieving sales to businesses, and an in-depth interpretation of the value based proposition. This course will also give you an opportunity to analyze ÀifÀ a product/service should be launch, produced, or developed, for a specific marketplace, or if the idea/product/service should be abandoned.

  • Credits: 2
MKC 330 Marketing Research MKC-330
  • This course gives students the tools for researching the consumer using qualitative and quantitative methods. Students will have the opportunity to create a marketing research plan for a product.

  • Credits: 3
MKC 380 Marketing Strategy MKC-380
  • This capstone course relates concepts learned in previous marketing certificate courses in an effort to synthesize the information and create a strategic marketing plan.

  • Credits: 3
MKC 340 Promotional Strategy MKC-340
  • Promotions consist of advertising, sales promotion, sales, public relations, and direct marketing. These avenues for transmitting oneÕs message effectively will be examined for usefulness, cost/benefit analysis, and social value. Students will have the opportunity to create their own promotional plans.

  • Credits: 3
MKC 350 Relationship Marketing MKC-350
  • An understanding of consumer behavioral patterns is central to the discipline of marketing. In this course, we look at individuals and organizations as consumers.

  • Credits: 3
MKM 341 Applied Accounting & Finance MKM-341
  • In this course, financial information is made easier to comprehend. Financial reporting, contribution margins and project financing will be presented.

  • Credits: 3
MKM 431 Applied Accounting & Finance MKM-431
  • In this course financial information is made easier to comprehend. It provides the foundation for basic principles and concepts that will make non-finance managers better equipped for service to the organization. Students will address financial assessment, budgeting and spending, global and ethical implications of financial decision-making, and financial prioritization for the present and the future. This course will provide the framework for the financials of market planning strategy including sales, new product development, return on investment, price and profit while offering the student an understanding of corporate reports and internal control.

  • Credits: 4
MKM 411 Applied Business Ethics MKM-411
  • This course is designed to investigate the broad spectrum of personal, business and society ethical issues that managers/leaders encounter. As corporate America struggles to find its social and ethical identity in a business environment that grows increasingly complex, managers are confronted with exceedingly difficult challenges. These challenges include balancing their economic, legal, ethical, and social responsibilities to the variety of stakeholder groups in which they interact. This course provides the structure for students to explore their personal ethics and develop the framework for addressing tough ethical decisions in business and in marketing. Students will apply ethical frameworks to business problems.

  • Credits: 4
MKM 415 Biblical Christianity MKM-415
  • The question, What is religious thought? will be explored in the light of American culture. Students wrestle with basic questions of life, such as What is the meaning of life? World religions are discussed from the perspective of a Christian belief system. This course satisfies a general education requirement.

  • Credits: 4
MKM 325 Business and Personal Ethics MKM-325
  • Students explore their personal ethics and develop frameworks for addressing tough ethical decisions in business and in marketing.

  • Credits: 3
MKM 440 Business Plan MKM-440
  • Students will create their own business plan for a product of their choice. The goal of this course is to enable the student to become proficient in developing his or her own business plans.

  • Credits: 3
MKM 480 Business Plan MKM-480
  • This course spans the Marketing Management and Innovation program at Concordia University. It is presented as an independent study where students create their own business plan for a selected company, product, entity, or department approved by their faculty advisor. The goal of this course is to enable the student to become proficient in developing his or her own business plans.

  • Credits: 4
MKM 346 Electronic Marketing MKM-346
  • Amazon.com? Anything.com? Electronic commerce is with us more today than ever before. Cars, travel, clothing, and food are being sold through the Internet. This course examines how to market goods and services electronically.

  • Credits: 3
MKM 425 Global Marketing MKM-425
  • It is said that contemporary employees compete with other employees worldwide. The economy is global and it is necessary to understand other parts of the world and how business is implemented. Students will create marketing plans to market products to other countries.

  • Credits: 3
MKM 402 Impl Soc. Media Plans & Proces MKM-402
  • This course will explore the process of implementing a social media marketing and communications strategy utilizing a range of social media applications and platforms (including mobile). This process will include developing engagement approaches and creating content and social objects to populate channels for that engagement. Students will learn the fundamentals of building and optimizing a powerful presence in the most widely used social channels (Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, blogs, etc.) gaining real-world experience in this process by working with a client of their choice (this must also be the same client they developed a social media strategy in the prior course).

  • Credits: 4
MKM 340 Industry Analysis MKM-340
  • Numbers can be intimidating. In this course, financial information is made less daunting and easy to comprehend. Financial reporting, contribution margins, and project financing will be presented.

  • Credits: 2
MKM 410 Industry Analysis MKM-410
  • Students will fully investigate the dynamics of an industry of their choice. Students will analyze the structure, competition, success/failure factors, distributive systems, and other industry factors. Marketing professionals perform similar industry analysis as part of their jobs.

  • Credits: 2
MKM 311 Innovation & Complex Systems MKM-311
  • This course introduces innovation as an essential for the new rule of business. Students will learn the framework and techniques to systematize innovation allowing them to take advantage of emerging opportunities. They will use the knowledge to understand how innovation affects the way we deploy resources to fulfill customer desires, viewing themselves as agents of innovation within organizations. Within this course of study the student will also examine the underlying dynamics, culture and change within an organizational context.

  • Credits: 4
MKM 310 Innovation MKM-310
  • Innovation is essential; that's the rule of business for the new millennium. Students will learn about product development, entrepreneurship, and different types of innovation.

  • Credits: 3
MKM 430 Innovative Marketing MKM-430
  • The five Ps of marketing: place, price, product, promotion, and people, are the center of this module. The building blocks of the five Ps, understanding, and researching the customer, are also covered.

  • Credits: 3
MKM 330 Integrated Marketing Comm MKM-330
  • This course will focus on developing marketing strategy and executing diverse communication tactics that are critical for business success. The student develops specific targeted communications and campaigns to meet their strategic communication objectives and target markets while integrating elements to gain an appreciation for the promotion mix (personal selling, direct mail, advertising, public relations, electronic and personal selling, etc.) tactics. Students will create their own promotional plans as avenues for transmitting marketing messages effectively and present those to the cohort based on their overall value related to usefulness, cost/benefit analysis and social value.

  • Credits: 4
MKM 350 Interactive & Mobile Mktg MKM-350
  • This course will explore the explosion of Internet marketing options to engage consumers. It is designed as an introduction to the rapidly evolving world of Interactive marketing focusing on the tools of Internet marketing. Students will explore integrating electronic methods into the marketing function. The course includes discussion of the importance of website return on investment and brand building, community development and digital marketing models. Social media strategy and mobile marketing are also built into the course. By analyzing a company's marketing situation the student will complete an Internet marketing plan that aligns to the business objectives.

  • Credits: 4
MKM 360 International Marketing MKM-360
  • Today the economy is global and it is necessary to understand other world stakeholders and how business is ethically implemented worldwide. This course focuses on contemporary issues marketing across national borders, marketing within foreign countries and collaborating within global markets. Areas of focus include identifying marketing-based international business opportunities within the context of cultural, social, economic and governmental factors that may influence buyer behavior and ultimately determine market strategy. Students will create international marketing plans to market products to other countries.

  • Credits: 4
MKM 498 Internship MKM-498
  • The Marketing Internship provides the opportunity to gain knowledge through the experiential activities of organizational life. Joint cooperation with business, government, and non-profit institutions in structuring and monitoring work experience aimed at supplementing the marketing learning process. Opportunities are developed in consultation with the faculty advisor and department chair and require approval of both.

  • Credits: 1
MKM 321 Marketing Innovation MKM-321
  • This course is the foundation of the marketing program. It reviews the concepts and application-oriented framework for marketing decision-making in a dynamic environment. Students explore current and emerging trends within a shifting marketplace and economic landscape. The five P's of marketing - place, price, product, promotion and people - are the center of this module. The course emphasizes environmental scanning, target customers and achieving organizational objectives through the intentional and skillful blending of marketing strategies. Students will create their own marketing plans within this module.

  • Credits: 4
MKM 335 Marketing Research MKM-335
  • This course gives students the tools for researching consumers and markets. Students learn to develop surveys, observation, experiments, and other tools for learning about customer characteristics and requirements. They learn about analytical techniques, data sources, research planning and costs. It requires an understanding of the components of the marketing research process, how to utilize it effectively to obtain relevant information, and how to integrate such information into the marketing decision-making process. Students will complete a marketing research plan for their final assignment.

  • Credits: 3
MKM 342 Marketing Research MKM-342
  • This course gives students the tools for researching consumers and markets. Students learn to develop surveys, observation, experiments, and other tools for learning about customer characteristics and requirements. They learn about analytical techniques, data sources, research planning and costs. It requires an understanding of the components of the marketing research process, how to utilize it effectively to obtain relevant information, and how to integrate such information into the marketing decision-making process. As part of this course students will fully investigate the dynamics of an industry of their choice. Students will analyze the structure, competition, success/failure factors, distribution systems and other industry factors. This analysis will be used in their final business plan

  • Credits: 4
MKM 435 Marketing Strategy MKM-435
  • This capstone course combines everything that has been taught in previous courses. Students analyze graduate-level case studies. Group work is essential.

  • Credits: 3
MKM 441 Marketing Strategy MKM-441
  • This course combines the overall coursework students have learned throughout their program of study. Students analyze graduate-level case studies for developing and implementing strategies that are distinctive and sustainable. The students will explore market entry and strategy alternatives as well as the integration of marketing strategy within operations, finance, supply chain and corporate culture within a global economy. Collaboration and group work is essential as students determine markets to compete based on their organizationÕs ability to create a competitive value proposition for the consumer.

  • Credits: 4
MKM 403 Monitor & Meas. Soc. Media Com MKM-403
  • This course will explore the process of managing and measuring a social media strategy using a range of (paid and free) social search and measurement tools. This process will include learning more about the role of a Community Manager and understanding the practical applications of launching a social media initiative and integrating social media into an existing company infrastructure. Students will learn the fundamentals of social media monitoring and strategies for online reputation management and will be exposed to a range of social media case studies. They will also have an opportunity to present their own measurements when they report on the successes and struggles working with the client they selected for SMC 401 and 402 courses.

  • Credits: 4
MKM 315 Personal Resources:Assess/Appl MKM-315
  • Students investigate their own past, strengths, and weaknesses in order to understand how to best create and develop personal strategic plans for their future.

  • Credits: 3
MKM 345 Promotional Strategies MKM-345
  • Promotion consists of advertising, sales promotion, sales, public relations, direct marketing, and more. These avenues for transmitting marketing messages across effectively are examined for usefulness, cost/benefit analysis, and social value. Students will create their promotional plans.

  • Credits: 3
MKM 331 Relationship Marketing MKM-331
  • This course gives students the tools for researching consumers and markets. Qualitative and quantitative methods are explored. Students will create a marketing research plan for a product.

  • Credits: 3
MKM 401 Strategic Apprch Social Media MKM-401
  • This course will teach the fundamentals of using social media and explore how it is changing business communications through integration into marketing, PR, customer service and sales functions. Students will explore the process of developing a social media marketing and communications strategy for a business or organization and creating a strategic plan to chart a course for implementing that strategy. The strategic process will be supported by research and measurement projects using social search tools, in addition to assessing client goals, expectations and resources. Students will receive an introduction to the most widely used social tools in preparation of their research. As part of this course, students will choose a client to work with developing a real world social strategy throughout the series of three courses (Strategy, Implementation and Measurement).

  • Credits: 4
MKM 320 Systems Management MKM-320
  • Organizations are unique in and of themselves. Students will examine underlying dynamics, culture, and change within an organizational context.

  • Credits: 3
MLM 510 Applied Moral & Ethical Ldrshp MLM-510
  • This course connects morality, ethics, and values with leadership and influence. Students explore and respond to challenging organizational dilemmas while balancing personal integrity and organization goals from the perspective of Christianity and vocational ethics, incorporating these elements into the personal and professional decision-making process.

  • Credits: 4
MLM 589 Contextual Global Experience MLM-589
  • This international travel experience includes preparatory readings, comparative analysis, and reflection on a distinct leadership, management, or social influence topic that bridges learning to application in the organizational setting. (May be substituted for MLM 542.

  • Credits: 4
MLM 525 Financial Mgmt for Leaders MLM-525
  • This course explores the practical aspects of the strategic and operational roles of financial management, accounting, analysis, and an introduction to finance-based decision-making related to working capital and long-term financing and investment. Students will learn the impact of a leader and/or managerÕs influence on budgeting, financial performance, and fiscal and ethical responsibility.

  • Credits: 4
MLM 555 Ldrshp & Mgmt Res, Synthesis.. MLM-555
  • This course offers students the opportunity to leverage their learning from the entire program. They will reflect their learning related to leadership, management, and social influence on topics relevant to their professional organizational setting. Students will also complete significant final steps in their research and present a formal report on their action research project.

  • Credits: 4
MLM 500 Ldrshp, Mgmt, Influen & Change MLM-500
  • This course provides an overview of leadership, management, influence, social power dynamics, and change theories and practices, emphasizing application to the challenges and opportunities facing for-profit corporations, nonprofits, and government agencies. Introduces the philosophies and methodological approaches underlying the Master of Arts in Leadership and Management as well as the writing and online research skills students will use in this program.

  • Credits: 4
MLM 545 Legal Issues Today’s Leaders MLM-545
  • This course explores how the legal environment can influence a leaderÕs decisions, guiding their actions and helping them avoid legal pitfalls in todayÕs complex organizations. This understanding will help leaders identify greater opportunities to influence change and innovation. Students will also learn to understand and influence the spirit behind various policies, regulations, laws, and guidelines that take leadership beyond simple compliance with governmental regulations.

  • Credits: 4
MLM 552 Organizational Culture Mgmt MLM-552
  • This course explores how leaders manage the soft, relationship skills of organizational life to leverage their experience and practical research as they successfully influence innovative, disciplined, and well-led organizations. Topics explore strategies to a) assess an organizationÕs culture and climate; b) develop a continuous flow talent management mindset incorporating Training & Development methods throughout the organization; c) motivate and positively influence team member effectiveness and obtain applicable concepts and tools for acquiring, developing, improving, influencing, and (re)allocating talent; d) explore the concepts and theories related to change management and improvement; and e) develop skills to influence, plan, and implement changes for improving organizational life in both corporate and nonprofit settings.

  • Credits: 4
MLM 532 Project & Quality Management MLM-532
  • This course covers the practical aspects of completing tasks while working with, leading, and influencing teams in a project environment for high quality results. Students will learn how to effectively manage projects using software tools that focus on the various related leadership issues, such as monitoring needs compared with current action, team dynamics, planning, execution, problem-solving, closure, and assessment. Discussion may include appropriate quality measures including Reengineering, Six Sigma, Lean Manufacturing, Office Kaizen, and Process Improvement.

  • Credits: 4
MLM 542 Strategic Ldrshp & Process Imp MLM-542
  • This course examines the leader and managerÕs role in influencing the development and implementation of vision, mission, values, and coherent strategic plans. Students will use classical and creative strategies to develop short- and long-term goals that improve operational effectiveness and strategically position an organization for the future. Students will also diagnose their own strategic capabilities and develop a plan for increasing their strengths in this area. Emphasis will be placed on ways to manage the implementation phase through best-practice processes.

  • Credits: 4
MLM 520 Strategic Organiz Research MLM-520
  • This course provides students with the ability to gather, analyze, and synthesize complex credible information about a topic of interest using quantitative and qualitative action research methodologies. Students choose a topic that relates to leadership, management, and/or social power dynamics and properly leverage their influence as they complete an action research project using a strategy to improve an organizational situation. While the emphasis of this course is on applied methods of research, an overview of the theory and some of the political and ethical implications of research will also be covered.

  • Credits: 4
MMC 220 Academic Management MMC-220
  • You've got (or ALMOST got) the degree, NOW WHAT? Learn innovative ways to leverage your new degree and skills to advance in your current job or change directions completely. This course is designed for students in both master's and degree-completion programs who are asking, what can I do with a major in organizational management?

  • Credits: 1
MMC 218 Career and Life Planning MMC-218
  • Not sure what you want to be when you grow up or what to do with your new degree? Take a look at who you are to move forward on your career path. This class covers self-assessment such as core values, strengths, dreams, purpose statements, and much more.

  • Credits: 2
MMC 219 Informational Interviewing MMC-219
  • An informational interview is an informal conversation with someone working in an area of interest to you who will give you information and advice. It is an effective research tool in addition to other methods of researching an occupation. Come learn how to effectively use this strategy in your job search plan.

  • Credits: 1
MMC 201 Principles of Customer Service MMC-201
  • Customer service is neither luck nor accident. Creating excellence in customer service is methodical and organized. In this course students learn how to craft customer service strategies that create loyal customers. Students examine customer service audits, moments of truth, gap analysis, and service recovery agents.

  • Credits: 2
MMC 210 Strategies/Job Search Success MMC-210
  • When jobs are few and competition is fierce, you have to truly shine - in person and on paper - to get an employer's attention. Learn how to shine by mastering fundamental principles of a successful job hunt: creating a solid resume; writing compelling cover letters and other correspondence; interviewing effectively, developing an effective job search plan focusing on your goals and more!

  • Credits: 2
MUS 357 7-12 General Music Tchng Mthds MUS-357
  • This course will deal with the planning and implementation of instruction in the non-performance-based music class from kindergarten to the senior high at the secondary school levels. Students will examine curriculum, textbooks and teaching materials available for these classes. The National Standards for Arts Education receive special attention in relation to planning a spiral curriculum. A strong emphasis is placed on unit and lesson planning. The course is required for all Music Teaching Majors. Offered every even fall. Prerequisites: MUS120 or 121, MUS 202.

  • Credits: 2
MUS 369 Art of Accompanying MUS-369
  • This course is designed as a practice and provides students with the skills necessary to become artistic and capable accompanists. Areas explored include vocal, instrumental, and choral accompanying. (Offered odd falls. Prerequisite: MUS840 or other previous private piano study. Studio course.)

  • Credits: 1
MUS 101 Basic Musicianship MUS-101
  • Basic Musicianship is designed for the student with little background in music. This course will present concepts needed for an understanding of the basic fundamentals of music theory. Students will also have an introduction to ear training and the keyboard. (Offered every spring. No prerequisite. This course can serve as a prerequisite for MUS201 and ED446. Studio course.)

  • Credits: 2
MUS 814 Bassoon MUS-814
  • 1 credit each, repeatable. Meets 1/2 hour per week. May not be taken pass/no pass. These courses may be repeated with credit. Individual lessons on the standard orchestral and band instruments and voice stress proper tone production, phrasing and style. Special techniques unique to the instrument are studied. Material covered includes standard works for the instrument. All lessons include studio classes scheduled throughout the term as a lab time. (Offered every semester. Prerequisites: approval and placement by instructor. Private lesson fee.)

  • Credits: 1
MUS 914 Bassoon MUS-914
  • 2 credits each, repeatable. Meets 1 hour per week. May not be taken pass/no pass. Each of the above 800 level individual lessons may be taken as weekly one-hour lessons with the instructor's approval. Honors lessons may be taken in conjunction with recital preparation. All lessons include studio classes scheduled throughout the term as a lab time. (Offered every semester. Prerequisites: music reading ability, previous study at the 800 level and/or approval and placement by instructor. Private lesson fee.)

  • Credits: 2
MUS 261 Beginning Conducting MUS-261
  • The goal of this introductory course is to begin to develop a clear and expressive conducting technique. Students will conduct in class frequently, videotaping their work and receiving immediate feedback and suggestions for improvement. Students will learn to conduct regular beat patterns, preparatory gestures, cues, cutoffs, deadbeats, fermatas, asymmetrical patterns, and subdivided gestures. Students will learn to make thoughtful decisions in varying their conducting pattern to show changes in dynamics, tempo, and articulation. Activities to strengthen the inner ear while conducting will also be included. Requirement: for Church Music and Music Education majors. (Offered every odd fall. Prerequisites: music reading ability, MUS201 and/or consent of instructor. Studio course.)

  • Credits: 2
MUS 115 Beginning Guitar I MUS-115
  • This course is designed for those with no knowledge of the instrument. Areas covered include tuning the guitar, strumming techniques, chords-two keys, and transposing. Open to all students. (Offered every fall and spring. No prerequisite. Players with previous guitar experience may be exempt by examination and move on to private guitar if desired or needed for program. Studio course.)

  • Credits: 1
MUS 116 Beginning Guitar II MUS-116
  • This course is a continuation of Beginning Guitar I with additional chords in several more keys. This course is recommended for students desiring to study private guitar. (Offered every spring. Prerequisite: MUS115 Beginning Guitar I or consent of instructor. Studio course.)

  • Credits: 1
MUS 778 Brass Ensemble MUS-778
  • Ensembles are open to all levels of brass students. Brass ensemble is designed to develop each individuals small ensemble playing. Performances include on and off campus concerts, worship services, fall and spring concerts

  • Credits: 1
MUS 362 Brass Techniques & Pedagogy MUS-362
  • This course acquaints students with the techniques and challenges of playing and teaching brass instruments. (Offered odd falls. Prerequisite: music reading ability. Studio course.)

  • Credits: 1
MUS 802 Cello MUS-802
  • 1 credit each, repeatable. Meets 1/2 hour per week. May not be taken pass/no pass. These courses may be repeated with credit. Individual lessons on the standard orchestral and band instruments and voice stress proper tone production, phrasing and style. Special techniques unique to the instrument are studied. Material covered includes standard works for the instrument. All lessons include studio classes scheduled throughout the term as a lab time. (Offered every semester. Prerequisites: approval and placement by instructor. Private lesson fee.)

  • Credits: 1
MUS 902 Cello MUS-902
  • 2 credits each, repeatable. Meets 1 hour per week. May not be taken pass/no pass. Each of the above 800 level individual lessons may be taken as weekly one-hour lessons with the instructor's approval. Honors lessons may be taken in conjunction with recital preparation. All lessons include studio classes scheduled throughout the term as a lab time. (Offered every semester. Prerequisites: music reading ability, previous study at the 800 level and/or approval and placement by instructor. Private lesson fee.)

  • Credits: 2
MUS 730 Chamber/String Ensemble MUS-730
  • Chamber Ensemble performs works drawn from worldwide genres. Performances include chapel services, fall and spring concerts, and Commencement. Occasional off-campus performances are also scheduled. (Offered every fall and spring. Prerequisite: prior instrumental experience and seat audition placement.)

  • Credits: 1
MUS 782 Chapel Band MUS-782
  • Open to singers and instrumentalists by audition. The ensemble performs a variety of praise, prayer and ethnic worship music for chapel in contemporary music idioms. Planning and leading a full chapel service is a feature of the group's activities. (Prerequisite: audition by instructor.)

  • Credits: 1
MUS 445 Choral Arranging MUS-445
  • This course is designed for the musician wishing to make effective settings for choral groups. (Offered odd springs. Prerequisites: MUS301, current or previous enrollment in MUS302.)

  • Credits: 1
MUS 456 Choral Conducting & Methods MUS-456
  • This advanced conducting course will apply and develop the skills gained in MUS261, focusing on leading choirs. Topics will include literature selection/programming for various school and church choirs, choral score study, audition procedures, seating formations, rehearsal planning and execution, working to develop vocal quality and musicianship in rehearsals and administration of church and school choral programs. A major component of the course will be the preparation and conducting of a public choral ensemble performance. Requirement for Vocal Music Education majors and Church Music majors-choral track. (Offered even springs. Prerequisite: MUS261. Studio course.)

  • Credits: 2
MUS 425 Choral Literature MUS-425
  • A study of the choral literature from the Renaissance through the present (including global choral music) forms the material for this course. Choral composers and representative compositions from each era are studied. The historical perspective on choral music is discussed and a filing card reference library developed. (Offered odd falls. Prerequisites: MUS120 or 121, MUS202 or consent of instructor.)

  • Credits: 2
MUS 525 Choral Literature MUS-525
  • A study of the choral literature from the Renaissance through the 20th century (including global choral music) forms the material for this course. Choral composers and representative compositions from each era are studied. The historical perspective on choral music is discussed and a filing card reference library developed. The final project is a graduate level review of web-based choral literature resources. (Prerequisite: completion of an undergraduate music history sequence and/or consent of instructor.)

  • Credits: 2
MUS 714 Christus Chorus MUS-714
  • This group presents major choral works in a series of concerts, including the Fine Arts Christmas and Concert. Weekend tours/retreats and an extended annual spring tour are part of the schedule. Trips abroad are planned occasionally. Auditions are held at the beginning and end of each academic year. Full-year membership is required. (Offered every fall and spring. Prerequisite: choral audition for placement by instructor.)

  • Credits: 1
MUS 440 Church Organist MUS-440
  • This course examines the role of the organist in Lutheran worship and seeks to prepare organists to provide effective leadership of hymns and liturgy. (Offered on demand). Prerequisite: 4 semesters of MUS850 - Private Organ Study or consent of instructor. Studio course.)

  • Credits: 2
MUS 774 Clarinet Ensemble MUS-774
  • Ensembles are open to all levels of clarinet students. Clarinet ensemble is designed to develop each individuals small ensemble playing. Performances include on and off campus concerts, worship services, fall and spring concerts

  • Credits: 1
MUS 812 Clarinet MUS-812
  • 1 credit each, repeatable. Meets 1/2 hour per week. May not be taken pass/no pass. These courses may be repeated with credit. Individual lessons on the standard orchestral and band instruments and voice stress proper tone production, phrasing and style. Special techniques unique to the instrument are studied. Material covered includes standard works for the instrument. All lessons include studio classes scheduled throughout the term as a lab time. (Offered every semester. Prerequisites: approval and placement by instructor. Private lesson fee.)

  • Credits: 1
MUS 912 Clarinet MUS-912
  • 2 credits each, repeatable. Meets 1 hour per week. May not be taken pass/no pass. Each of the above 800 level individual lessons may be taken as weekly one-hour lessons with the instructor's approval. Honors lessons may be taken in conjunction with recital preparation. All lessons include studio classes scheduled throughout the term as a lab time. (Offered every semester. Prerequisites: music reading ability, previous study at the 800 level and/or approval and placement by instructor. Private lesson fee.)

  • Credits: 2
MUS 111 Class Piano I MUS-111
  • This is the first of two courses in a beginning piano instruction sequence. Through group class instruction students are given a practical knowledge of the keyboard and an understanding of the tonal-rhythmic structure of music. Keyboard skills requisite for handling classroom music situations or for personal enjoyment of music are developed. (Offered every fall and spring. No prerequisite. Players with previous keyboard experience may be exempt by examination. Can serve as a prerequisite to MUS201 and ED446. Studio course.)

  • Credits: 2
MUS 112 Class Piano II MUS-112
  • This is the second of two courses in a beginning piano instruction sequence. Through group class instruction students are given a practical knowledge of the keyboard and an understanding of the tonal-rhythmic structure of music. Keyboard skills requisite for handling classroom music situations or for personal enjoyment of music are developed. (Offered every fall and spring. No prerequisite. Players with previous keyboard experience may be exempt by examination. Can serve as a prerequisite to MUS201 and ED446. Studio course.)

  • Credits: 2
MUS 161 Class Voice MUS-161
  • Students will examine and personally develop the foundations of a healthy, efficient technique of singing. Activities to achieve this goal include vocal exercises practiced in and out of the classroom, solo singing for one's classmates, lectures and demonstrations by the instructor on vocal technique and the vocal mechanism, and related reading assignments. (Offered every semester. No prerequisite. Studio course.)

  • Credits: 1
MUS 890 Composition Lessons MUS-890
  • 1 credit each, repeatable. Meets 1/2 hour per week. May not be taken pass/no pass. These courses may be repeated with credit. Individual lessons on the standard orchestral and band instruments and voice stress proper tone production, phrasing and style. Special techniques unique to the instrument are studied. Material covered includes standard works for the instrument. All lessons include studio classes scheduled throughout the term as a lab time. This course is open to students who have had MUS201. (Offered every semester. Prerequisites: MUS201; approval and placement by instructor. Private lesson fee.)

  • Credits: 1
MUS 492 Composition Recital MUS-492
  • The student is challenged to compose a major piece or group of pieces. Students are challenged to begin to develop a personal language, one that gives evidence of skill, imagination and originality and that communicates effectively to an audience. This project is the capstone experience for the Music Major in the Music Theory/Composition track. As part of this capstone, students will submit a written essay describing how the experience implemented and was supported by the Framework for Learning. (Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS990) Honors lesson fee applies.

  • Credits: 2
MUS 720 Concert Band MUS-720
  • Concert Band performs works drawn from worldwide genres. Performances include chapel services, fall and spring concerts, and Commencement. Occasional off-campus performances are also scheduled. (Offered every fall and spring. Prerequisite: prior instrumental experience and seat audition placement.)

  • Credits: 1
MUS 880 Conducting Lessons MUS-880
  • 1 credit each, repeatable. Meets 1/2 hour per week. May not be taken pass/no pass. These courses may be repeated with credit. Individual lessons on the standard orchestral and band instruments and voice stress proper tone production, phrasing and style. Special techniques unique to the instrument are studied. Material covered includes standard works for the instrument. All lessons include studio classes scheduled throughout the term as a lab time. (Offered every semester. Prerequisites: approval and placement by instructor. Private lesson fee.)

  • Credits: 1
MUS 431 Congregational Song MUS-431
  • Students examine the theology and history of congregational song, including psalms, liturgical chants, canticles, Latin and Greek hymnody, the Lutheran chorale, the English hymn, and contemporary sacred songs. (Offered odd springs. Prerequisite: MUS120 or 121.)

  • Credits: 4
MUS 739 CSP Ringers MUS-739
  • This course is open to any student with limited or no handbell experience. It teaches basic handbell techniques. Members of this class will perform 1-2 times/semester in chapel.

  • Credits: 1
MUS 267 Diction for Singers MUS-267
  • This course is designed for the student who is interested in enhancing his or her vocal training by expanding one's knowledge of Italian and German diction and song repertoire. Emphasis is placed on the understanding and production of pronunciation. Voice students and music majors, particularly those in the choral and church music tracks, will want to register for this course. (Offered odd falls. Prerequisite: 2 semesters of MUS860 - Private Voice or consent of instructor. Studio course.)

  • Credits: 1
MUS 365 Elect Instrmt Tech & Pedagogy MUS-365
  • This course introduces students to a range of computer-based music technologies. Extensive work is done with the music notation/MIDI program, Finale. Students will also explore using pre-set patches, sequencing, and creating new synthesized sounds. CD ROM programs for music history, music education, music theory, and ear-training will also be explored. Students will be expected to log lab hours in the music technology studio. This course is an elective in all music majors, minors, and emphases. (Offered every spring. Prerequisites: