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Minor inHmong Studies

Minoring in Hmong Studies involves exploring the culture, history and language of Hmong people worldwide. Our Hmong Studies minor is the only one of its kind in the world, providing a unique opportunity for you to augment your knowledge, language skills and cross-cultural expertise in a region and community of strategic and global importance. You’ll gain firsthand experiences in the Hmong-American community as you take 24 credit hours toward a Hmong studies minor in conjunction with a different bachelor’s degree major.

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1893 the year Concordia was founded
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Hmong Studies Curriculum Overview

You’ll gain firsthand experiences in the Hmong-American community as you take 24 credit hours toward a Hmong studies minor in conjunction with a different bachelor’s degree major. You’ll also have real experience to learn beyond the classroom, with tremendous opportunities to conduct research at Concordia’s Center for Hmong Studies and Archives and to interact with Hmong scholars from around the world through ongoing lectures, at special exhibits and during the Biennial International Conference on Hmong Studies hosted by Concordia. Because we design our Hmong studies program to be responsive to the exact needs of the marketplace, it will be a relevant minor as a supplement to a variety of majors that will prepare you to work in fields such as international affairs, international business, the arts, government policy, health science, criminal justice and education.

Required: 10 credits
Course ID Course Name Credit Hours
HMG - 101 Intro to Hmong Studies 2
HMG - 110 Introduction to Hmong History 4
HMG - 201 Hmong Culture and Society 4

Through a combination of lectures, reading and research, students will gain a better understanding of the Hmong community and the area of Hmong studies through the work of Hmong scholars and researchers from around the world.

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This course will examine the rich history of the Hmong people in China, Laos, Thailand, Vietnam and America and the various roles that the Hmong have had on these nations. The class will also look at the various challenges and opportunities that the Hmong faced in these countries.

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Through a combination of lectures and field work experiences, students will gain a better understand of the Hmong community here and throughout the world as they deal with changes relating to globalization and acculturation.

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Electives: 14 Credits
Course ID Course Name Credit Hours
COM - 309 Intercultural Communication 4
FAS - 400 Family Systems 4
HIS - 339 Race & Ethnicity inUS Hist 4
HIS - 393 Modern China, 1911-present 4
HMG - 202 Hmong Literature and Art 4
HMG - 254 People & Culture SE Asia 4
HMG - 255 People and Culture of China 4
HMG - 301 Hmong Cosmology and Belief 4
HMG - 327 Reading and Writing for Hmong 2
HMG - 328 Reading & Wrtng for Hmong-Intm 2
POL - 241 Cont. World Problems:Glbl Pol. 4
SOC - 357 Class and Community 4
SOC - 358 Minority Groups 4

Students explore the principles and processes of communication between cultures. Course topics include intercultural communication models, the impact of different cultural patterns on the communication process, the anthropological concept world view and its impact on intercultural communication, detection of communication problems in intercultural situations, gender and diversity issues in intercultural communication, and constructing valid strategies for communicating interculturally. (Prerequisite: COM103 or COM212)

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This course is an analysis of the family. It investigates the family as a system of relationships which interacts across the family life cycle. It includes a survey of current developments in the study of the family and an analysis of changes in American society and their influence on family life. Also included is a focus on marriage and family therapy from a systems framework.

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This course examines those who came or were brought to the United States through the slave trade, economic, social, and political dislocations in different parts of the world and more personal factors. Various modes of assimilation and diversity will be discussed, as will the stories of many of the different peoples who have served to create the citizenry of the United States.

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This course will study the effects of Western colonialism, the Sino-Japanese War, and World War I on China, and trace the development of the modern Chinese state, including the formation of the People's Republic of China and Taiwan. Emphasis will also be placed on China's relations with other countries around the world, as well as its treatment of ethnic minorities within its own borders.

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In this course, students will explore the various literatures (folk as well as modern) and art forms that have been in use by the Hmong for over 4,000 years. A combination of field experiences/observations, and readings as well class discussion will be used.

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This course explores the people and culture of countries in Southeast Asia including Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos. These Southeast Asia countries known for their ancient culture, increasing modernization and breathtaking beauty, provide a rich setting for interdisciplinary learning. This course is designed to introduce students to the region's history and culture. Students will learn about language, literature, history, religion, economics, politics, education, arts and other aspects of Thai, Vietnamese, Cambodian and Laotian cultures. Students will receive an orientation prior to the trip that will acquaint them with the course and its learning objectives. Classroom instruction and cultural appreciation will be integrated with the cultural tours. Particular attention is given to the Hmong experience in two comparative contexts: Southeast Asia, and the United States. The program will take place in a number of southeast Asian countries: Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam.

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China, known for its ancient culture, increasing modernization and breathtaking beauty, provides a rich setting for interdisciplinary learning. This course is designed to introduce students to the people and culture of China. Students will learn about the Chinese language, literature, history, religion, economics, politics, education, arts and other aspects of Chinese culture. Students will receive an orientation and become acquainted with the course objectives prior to the course. Classroom instruction and cultural appreciation will be integrated with a cultural tour of Beijing, Xi'an , and other major Chinese cities and sites. Visits to the great wall of china, the temple of heaven, the summer palace, Tiananmen Square, the forbidden city, and the Lama Temple. Excursions will be made to local markets, a Chinese cooking class, a river cruise, a site visit to a Chinese school, the Terracotta Warriors, and a Hmong village. Particular attention is given to the Hmong experience in two comparative contexts: China, and the United States.

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This class will explore all the aspects of Hmong beliefs and the different forms of religions that are practiced by the Hmong throughout the world. Students will learn from books/assigned readings, lectures, class interaction and field work/observation.

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Students enrolled in the class will gain general understanding of the origin of the Hmong language and also be able to read and write basic Hmong.

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With regular interactive group activities, students will enhance their Hmong through a series of reading and writing Hmong short stories, poems, proverbs as well as key activities surrounding family and social events.

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Survey and examination of the current issues and problems around the world. Course will also discuss themes and approaches in the study of global politics. Students will specifically examine how the current global system is constructed and how nations interact. Topics include contemporary issues like globalization, trade, immigration, war and peace, arms control, terrorism, climate change, and global poverty.

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This course analyzes the nature and functions of American social class and community life. The primary focus is on patterns of social in equality and resulting systems of stratification, both of which are evaluated in terms of their consequences for the individual and the community. The debate of rights verses responsibilities forms the basis of inquiry into the individual-community relationship. (Prerequisite: SOC152)

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Students study various racial, ethnic, and other social groups in the broad context of American society. Attention is given to the concept of minority status as it relates to prejudices, discrimination and segregation in contemporary life. (Prerequisite: SOC152)

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An academic minor normally consists of 20 to 24 credits taken in courses in one area or related areas of study prescribed by the faculty.

Meet Your Professors

Lee Pao Xiong Director of the Center for Hmong Studies, Instructor of Asian Studies

Lee Pao is widely sought after as a speaker and trainer to speak about Hmong history, culture, and society as well as on leadership and board governance related topics.

Career Potential

  • Arts
  • Criminal Justice
  • Education
  • Government Policy
  • Graduate School
  • Health Science
  • International Affairs
  • International Business
  • Social Services