Minor inSociology

Minoring in Sociology involves the study the roles people play in society, both as individuals and in groups.

26 NCAA Academic All-America Honors
1893 the year Concordia was founded
16:1 Student/Faculty Ratio
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Sociology Curriculum Overview

Minoring in Sociology involves the study the roles people play in society, both as individuals and in groups. How does group interaction change over time? How do ideas of what’s normal and what’s not come into being? How do social class and ethnicity shape people’s lives? You’ll learn to become a critical thinker about the social world as you take 24 credit hours toward a Sociology minor in conjunction with a different bachelor’s degree major.

Prerequisites from General Education
Course ID Course Name Credit Hours
MAT - 110 Intro Probability & Statistics 3

This course will explore fundamental topics from probability and descriptive and inferential statistics and apply these to a range of areas of study including business, social science, and biology. Topics include probability and counting rules, probability distributions, hypothesis testing, correlation, regression, chi-square, and analysis-of-variance. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in MAT100 or MAT103 or level 3 or higher placement on the Math Placement Exam.)

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Required: 12 Credits
Course ID Course Name Credit Hours
SOC - 152 Introduction to Sociology 4
SOC - 453 Social Theory 4
SOC - 454 Soc Research Methods & Stats 4

This course provides an introduction to the systematic study of society and social behavior. Investigation will focus on the values and norms shared by society's members, the groups and institutions that compose social structure, and the forces that are transforming social reality.

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This class provides an overview of classic and contemporary theory including a discussion of the works of Karl Marx, Max Webber, Georg Simmel, Emile Durkheim, George Herbert Mead, Talcott Parsons, Ralf Dahrendorf, Anthony Giddens, and others. Social theory is examined as a continually evolving process that both inspires and enlightens sociological research. **This course serves as the capstone experience for the sociology major. (Prerequisite: SOC152)

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This course explores empirical sociological investigation, covering principles of scientific inquiry, research design (surveys, experimentation, field research, secondary source analysis, evaluation research), data collection, and data analysis (descriptive and inferential statistics). (Prerequisites: SOC152, MAT110)

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Electives: 12 Credits
Course ID Course Name Credit Hours
HMG - 254 People & Culture SE Asia 4
HMG - 255 People and Culture of China 4
SOC - 253 Marriage and Family 4
SOC - 256 Intro to Criminal Justice 4
SOC - 351 Juvenile Justice 4
SOC - 352 Police and Community 4
SOC - 354 Sociology of Law 4
SOC - 357 Class and Community 4
SOC - 358 Minority Groups 4
SOC - 359 Social Welfare:An Institution 4
SOC - 451 Social Psychology 4
SOC - 452 Social Organization 4
SOC - 488 Sociology Independent Study 0

This course explores the people and culture of countries in Southeast Asia including Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos. These Southeast Asia countries known for their ancient culture, increasing modernization and breathtaking beauty, provide a rich setting for interdisciplinary learning. This course is designed to introduce students to the region's history and culture. Students will learn about language, literature, history, religion, economics, politics, education, arts and other aspects of Thai, Vietnamese, Cambodian and Laotian cultures. Students will receive an orientation prior to the trip that will acquaint them with the course and its learning objectives. Classroom instruction and cultural appreciation will be integrated with the cultural tours. Particular attention is given to the Hmong experience in two comparative contexts: Southeast Asia, and the United States. The program will take place in a number of southeast Asian countries: Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam.

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China, known for its ancient culture, increasing modernization and breathtaking beauty, provides a rich setting for interdisciplinary learning. This course is designed to introduce students to the people and culture of China. Students will learn about the Chinese language, literature, history, religion, economics, politics, education, arts and other aspects of Chinese culture. Students will receive an orientation and become acquainted with the course objectives prior to the course. Classroom instruction and cultural appreciation will be integrated with a cultural tour of Beijing, Xi'an , and other major Chinese cities and sites. Visits to the great wall of china, the temple of heaven, the summer palace, Tiananmen Square, the forbidden city, and the Lama Temple. Excursions will be made to local markets, a Chinese cooking class, a river cruise, a site visit to a Chinese school, the Terracotta Warriors, and a Hmong village. Particular attention is given to the Hmong experience in two comparative contexts: China, and the United States.

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This course considers the family as one of the primary social institutions within the larger social system. It explores the family's internal structure and functioning, how it serves the needs of both individuals and society, how it is changing in contemporary American society, and the societal challenges of families in crisis. (Prerequisite: SOC152)

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The course uses a sociological perspective to analyze the meaning of crime for a society, theories of criminal behavior and crime prevention. Emphasis is placed on understanding the law enforcement, judicial and corrections systems. Current issues such as police discretion, gun control, capital punishment and corporate crime are examined. (Prerequisite: SOC152)

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The course examines the nature and extent of juvenile crime in American society. It includes an analysis of the historical and intellectual foundations of the juvenile justice system and the interpretation of Constitutional law as applied to children. Emphasis is placed on the role of the family and community in the prevention and treatment of delinquency. (Prerequisites: SOC152, SOC256)

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Though this course addresses the primary purposes and functions of policing, instructional priorities include scientific police management; the dynamics of community policing; theories underlying crime prevention and control; the ability of law enforcement of effectively address cultural diversity, police ethics; emerging technologies; and the application of Constitutional and Minnesota State law and procedures to current practice. (Prerequisites: SOC152, SOC256)

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This course examines the formal, public responses to crime. It includes a discussion of the nature of criminal law and its purposes and the classification and grading of various criminal wrongs. Case law examples are used to enable students to understand, critique and apply criminal laws to situations in contemporary society. (Prerequisites: SOC152, SOC256 or consent of instructor)

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This course analyzes the nature and functions of American social class and community life. The primary focus is on patterns of social in equality and resulting systems of stratification, both of which are evaluated in terms of their consequences for the individual and the community. The debate of rights verses responsibilities forms the basis of inquiry into the individual-community relationship. (Prerequisite: SOC152)

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Students study various racial, ethnic, and other social groups in the broad context of American society. Attention is given to the concept of minority status as it relates to prejudices, discrimination and segregation in contemporary life. (Prerequisite: SOC152)

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This course examines basic social welfare theory and methods in order to understand the structure and function of public and private welfare in American society. Social welfare is examined as part of the larger American social structure, reflecting cultural values as well as political and economic processes. Attention is given to several areas of social welfare in which specialization has occurred, including work with the elderly, the chemically dependent and battered children and adults. (Prerequisite: SOC152)

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Students examine how the individual's personality, behavior and attitudes are shaped through interaction with others. The course deals with such issues as conformity, persuasion, aggression, altruism, and attraction. Individual behavior is understood in light of symbolic communication and the social construction of the self. (Prerequisite: SOC152 or PSY101)

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This course addresses the fundamental question of how and why social organization is possible. Attention is given to major concepts and theories of social structure, forms of social organization (groups, communities, networks, formal organizations), basic social processes (integration, differentiation, regulation, change), the emergence of social organization from individual decision-making, and the sociology of work and occupations. (Prerequisite: SOC152)

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With the help of an instructor, students design their own learning activities, which may include readings, independent research, projects, and papers. (Prerequisite: SOC152)

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An academic minor normally consists of 20 to 24 credits taken in courses in one area or related areas of study prescribed by the faculty.

Career Potential

  • Adoption
  • Business
  • Community Development
  • Gerontology
  • Probation
  • Research
  • Social Services
  • Youth Development
  • Criminal Justice
  • Law

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