Minor inWriting Communication

Employers state almost unanimously that they want employees who can communicate well, both orally and in writing. The Writing Communications minor is designed for students who want to improve both aspects of communication.

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Writing Communication Curriculum Overview

Employers state almost unanimously that they want employees who can communicate well, both orally and in writing. The Writing Communications minor is designed for students who want to improve both aspects of communication.

Prerequisites from General Education:
Course ID Course Name Credit Hours
COM - 103 Interpersonal Communication 4
COM - 212 Public Speaking 4
ENG - 120 College Writing 4

Students examine their methods of interpersonal communication in various contexts including dyadic, small group, and mediated communication. Individual activities and group work include both oral and written components. Class discussions and small group activities provide opportunities to practice and refine interpersonal communication skills. Objective exams and quizzes focus on cognitive learning of the principles and concepts in the various communication contexts. (COM103 is one of the two choices for the communication general education requirement for all students. It is also a prerequisite for all communication majors.)

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Students prepare and deliver various types of public performances including speeches and oral interpretation. The evaluation and criticism of speeches is studied. Videotape helps students adjust to their performance style and improve presentation delivery. Course units include speech construction, presentation and delivery, audience and text analysis, informative, persuasive and special occasion speeches as well as visual aid construction. (COM212 is one of the two choices for the communication general education requirement for all students. It is also a prerequisite for all communication majors.)

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The content of a writing course is writing. For students to become proficient writers in all disciplines, they need to learn how to read and analyze a variety of texts and then practice reading and analyzing texts from various disciplines. Through research and writing, students learn what others are saying and how to integrate those ideas into their own writing. Constant practice will guide students into developing their own voice and style. They will make conscious choices related to audience and academic conventions.

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Electives: 24 Credits
Course ID Course Name Credit Hours
COM - 205 Small Group Communication 4
COM - 212 Public Speaking 4
COM - 222 Mass Communication 4
COM - 309 Intercultural Communication 4
COM - 363 Interview for the Professional 2
COM - 364 The Job Interview 2
COM - 478 Organizational Communication 4
ENG - 220 Applied Grammar 2
ENG - 221 Journalism 4
ENG - 222 Journalism Practicum 1
ENG - 227 Column Writing 2
ENG - 228 Review Writing 2
ENG - 320 Writing in the Workplace 2
ENG - 324 Teaching Writing 1:1 2
ENG - 325 Creative Writing 4
ENG - 326 Topics in Writing 2
ENG - 420 Persuasive Wrtng on Cont. Issu 4

Students study and practice communication in small discussion and task groups. Topics include leadership and facilitation of groups as well as group dynamics. Group activities include problem solving discussions and task completion. Course units include goal setting, cohesion and norms, power, leadership, decision-making and problem solving, conflict and facilitating task and interpersonal relations in face-to-face and virtual groups. (Prerequisite: COM103 or COM212)

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Students prepare and deliver various types of public performances including speeches and oral interpretation. The evaluation and criticism of speeches is studied. Videotape helps students adjust to their performance style and improve presentation delivery. Course units include speech construction, presentation and delivery, audience and text analysis, informative, persuasive and special occasion speeches as well as visual aid construction. (COM212 is one of the two choices for the communication general education requirement for all students. It is also a prerequisite for all communication majors.)

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Students study and learn to critically appraise various media by exploring the weaknesses and strengths of each. The content of the course includes history of the traditional mass media as well as an exploration of contemporary social media, advertising, public relations, media law and regulation, media ethics, and social responsibility. Video projects develop basic skills of digital image gathering, editing, and distribution. (Prerequisite: COM103 or COM212)

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Students explore the principles and processes of communication between cultures. Course topics include intercultural communication models, the impact of different cultural patterns on the communication process, the anthropological concept world view and its impact on intercultural communication, detection of communication problems in intercultural situations, gender and diversity issues in intercultural communication, and constructing valid strategies for communicating interculturally. (Prerequisite: COM103 or COM212)

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Students study and practice conducting interviews in professional activities such as: diagnostic interviews (as related to sexual harassment), discipline and termination interviews, performance appraisals, and focus groups. The interviewing skills used to develop those activities include preparing and developing a guide, questioning, probing, listening, recording, and concluding the interview. (Prerequisite: COM 103 or COM 212)

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Students study and practice interviewing skills as interviewee and interviewer in the job selection process. Interviewee skills will focus on rŽsumŽ writing and building, informational interviewing, interview preparation, verbal and nonverbal responses to questions, and assessing one's fit in an organizational culture. Interviewer skills will focus on creating a job interview guide, legal and illegal questions, nonverbal variables, and professionalism. (Prerequisite: COM 103 or COM 212)

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Students examine theories of communication systems, processes and assumptions in organization structures. Topics include roles, relationships and responsibilities of individuals within organizations as well as skills in and applications of organizational communication, including communication audits. Interviewing skills in the various demands of organizations will be examined and practiced. Values and ethical communication behaviors are explored through a variety of activities including case studies and self-assessments. Exploration of crisis communication strategies and their effectiveness in organizational image restoration are examined. (Prerequisites: COM103, COM212 and COM205)

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To communicate clearly, students must correctly apply the rules that govern the English language. Through reading, discussion, and constant practice, students in this course will examine and use these rules to further develop their writing skills.

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This course is an introduction to periodical journalism. It focuses on the contemporary practices, issues, and ethics of the profession. Students will practice extensive in-the field reporting and journalistic writing. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in ENG120)

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Journalism II provides an opportunity for hands-on experience in all aspects of producing a newspaper: writing, editing, layout, photography, business management, etc. This course is strongly suggested for those who wish to contribute to The Sword (the Concordia student newspaper) on a regular basis. It is required for the Editor-in-Chief, Technical Editor(s), and Page Editors. Beginning writers and photographers are encouraged to sign up. This workshop style class meets one hour a week, usually in the evenings.

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This course will introduce students to the role of columns as vehicles that affect both public opinion and the identities of periodicals. Study of a range of contemporary artifacts will provide a basis for understanding the balance of opinion and reporting in column writing. Students will both analyze and write columns.

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This course will introduce students to the various roles of the review in our culture. Study of contemporary artifacts will provide a basis for understanding the balance of presentation, critique, and edification in reviewing. Students will both analyze and write reviews.

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Students in this course will examine the conventions of writing in the workplace. The particular topics of the course will vary depending on the semester. Some of the topics covered might include grant writing, copyrighting, writing for the web, public relations writing, or technical writing. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in ENG120)

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Often, the best way to learn something is to teach it to someone else. Students in this course will do just that: improve their own writing, editing, and tutoring skills while helping others express their ideas in writing, develop their own writing voice, and edit their own work. Students will apply what they learn from readings, discussions, and writing assignments by tutoring in the Writing Center each week. (Prerequisite: ENG120)

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This course will examine the basic elements of short fiction and poetry and will require students to experiment with both genres. The class is run as a workshop: the main focus will be on the discussion of each other's work. It is also, to a certain extent, a literature course, since what one reads strongly influences what one writes. Assigned readings are intended to give students a fuller understanding of technique as well as a range of artistic possibilities. (Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ENG120 and ENG155)

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This course, the topic of which may vary from year to year, is designed to provide intermediate writers with the opportunity to experiment with different styles and genres.

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Students in this course analyze essays by established writers of expository prose, read articles in current magazines and journals and meet with local writers invited into the classroom. Students also write their own creative non-fiction and keep journals. Both in workshops and in individual conferences, the course asks students to consider their own writing as a process that requires their attention to revising and editing. (Prerequisites: ENG120, ENG155)

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Requirements

An academic minor normally consists of 20 to 24 credits taken in courses in one area or related areas of study prescribed by the faculty.

Career Potential

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