Bachelor of Science inPsychology

Majoring in Psychology involves the study of the way humans and animals act, feel, think and learn. How are personality and social development influenced? What is the relationship between mind and body? How are statistical principles used to analyze social science data? You’ll develop lifelong skills in scientific thinking and in understanding human thought, behavior and interaction as you take 79 credit hours towards a Bachelor of Science degree. (The B.S. degree carries a larger course load for the major than the B.A. degree, with additional coursework in mathematics, chemistry or biology.)

40+ Student Clubs and Organizations
26 NCAA Academic All-America Honors
1893 the year Concordia was founded
Apply Now

Psychology Curriculum Overview

Students graduating with a Bachelor of Science degree majoring in Psychology develop lifelong skills in scientific thinking and understanding human thought, behavior, and interaction. The educational learning in combination with the research focused internship experience prepares students to enter a career of choice, medical school, or graduate school.

Required: 24 Credits
Course ID Course Name Credit Hours
PSY - 101 Introduction to Psychology 4
PSY - 380 Research Meth/Stats Appl 4
PSY - 498 Psychology Internship 1
PSY - 490 Seminar on Psychological Topic 4
SOC - 451 Social Psychology 4
PSY - 300 Cognition, Learn & Memory 4
PSY - 310 Physiological Psychology 4
PSY - 320 Sensation and Perception 4
PSY - 330 Introduction to Counseling 4
PSY - 360 Abnormal Psychology 4
PSY - 370 Intro to Personality Theories 4
PSY - 210 Child Psychology and Dev 4
PSY - 220 Adolescent Psychology 4
SOC - 354 Sociology of Law 4
BIO - 120 Biology I: The Unity of Life 4
BIO - 210 Genetics 4
CHE - 115 General Chemistry I 4
MAT - 110 Intro Probability & Statistics 3
MAT - 125 Precalculus 4
MAT - 135 Calculus I 4

This course introduces the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Psychological, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic, psychodynamic and social-cultural perspectives are explored. Topics such as scientific method, statistical reasoning, neuroscience, learning, cognitive processes, development, psychological adjustment, therapy, social psychology, diversity and community are studied.

Download Our Catalog

This course covers a variety of research strategies for studying psychological phenomena. Students will conduct studies using different research methodologies and will gain experience in analyzing data and writing research reports. Descriptive Statistics, measures of central tendency, correlation, multiple regression, inferential statistics, chi-square, t-tests, analysis of variance, hypothesis testing with application to research methodologies will be taught. (Prerequisites: PSY101, MAT110)

Download Our Catalog

This internship provides the student with an in-depth field experience in a work setting that provides services that are psychological in nature. The student learns to apply psychological theories and principles. The student in conjunction with the academic advisor selects an appropriate internship site which meets the needs and vocational interests of the student.

Download Our Catalog

This course offers in-depth analysis of a selected topic in psychology such as intelligence, creativity, brain chemistry, cross-cultural psychology, group counseling and processes, advanced counseling, history and systems of psychology, psychology of religion, psychology of gender, forensic psychology, psychological testing, behavior modification, cognitive psychology and biofeedback in a seminar setting. Content determined by the needs of students and interest of psychology faculty. (Prerequisite: 25 credits of psychology or consent of instructor)

Download Our Catalog

Students examine how the individual's personality, behavior and attitudes are shaped through interaction with others. The course deals with such issues as conformity, persuasion, aggression, altruism, and attraction. Individual behavior is understood in light of symbolic communication and the social construction of the self. (Prerequisite: SOC152 or PSY101)

Download Our Catalog

This course introduces students to important insights and theoretical principles of modern cognitive science. Students study human cognition, perception and attention, memory, knowledge representation, language, reasoning, problem solving, cognitive development, creativity, learning, and individual differences in cognition. (Prerequisite: PSY101)

Download Our Catalog

This course will provide a comprehensive understanding of brain and nervous system physiology. The focus will be on how the nervous system governs behavioral and cognitive processes. Functional and dysfunctional physiology and what this tells us about maladaptive behaviors will also be discussed. (Prerequisite: PSY101)

Download Our Catalog

Sensing and perceiving the world involves an interaction between our bodies and minds. This course explores the neuroscience and psychological principles underlying human perceptual abilities. Students will encounter different theoretical approaches to the study of this question, as well as a variety of methodological techniques. Topics to be covered include the biological basis of vision, the perception of pattern, color, depth, and spatial layout. The senses of hearing, touch, smell, and taste will be similarly addressed. The course will conclude with an exploration of the relationship between perception to knowledge. (Prerequisite: PSY101)

Download Our Catalog

Basic theory, principles, and techniques of counseling and its application to counseling settings are explored. In addition, students develop counseling skills in the following three theoretical areas: person-centered therapy, behavioral contracting, and reality therapy. The student becomes both teacher and subject in experiential laboratory sessions. (Prerequisite: PSY101)

Download Our Catalog

An introduction to the study of abnormal psychology. The course covers a wide range of behaviors that are distressing to a person or society or which are otherwise identified as abnormal. A comprehensive review of the etiologies of psychological disorders, discussion of available treatments and a focus on the effects that mental illness has on the individual, the family system, and society are included. Current controversies in the field are identified. (Prerequisite: PSY101)

Download Our Catalog

This course introduces the student to a variety of personality theories including psychoanalytic, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic and trait and type theories. Issues in personality measurement and assessment techniques are also presented and discussed. (Prerequisite: PSY101)

Download Our Catalog

A broad sketch of human growth and development is provided from the prenatal stages to the adolescent years. Developmental processes are studied from both a biological and social-cultural perspective to understand physical and perceptual development, cognition and language, personality and social development. Child studies of children at the studentsÀ projected levels of teacher certification are required. (Prerequisite: PSY101)

Download Our Catalog

This course examines developmental phenomena of adolescence, its physiological, emotional, cognitive, parent-child, social, vocational and religious dimensions, with opportunity for personal exposure to youth's needs and interacting societal institutions. (Prerequisite: PSY101)

Download Our Catalog

This course examines the formal, public responses to crime. It includes a discussion of the nature of criminal law and its purposes and the classification and grading of various criminal wrongs. Case law examples are used to enable students to understand, critique and apply criminal laws to situations in contemporary society. (Prerequisites: SOC152, SOC256 or consent of instructor)

Download Our Catalog

Emphasizing inquiry and investigation, this course introduces students to the discoveries, both historical and contemporary, that support the unifying theories of modern biological science. Topics considered include the nature and methods of modern biological science; the basis of life in terms of matter, energy, cells, genetics, and reproduction; and the impact of evolution on the unity of life. The course is comprised of lectures, readings, discussions, written assignments, films, and an inquiry-based laboratory component. (Recommended prerequisites: one year of high school biology and chemistry and four years of high school mathematics)

Download Our Catalog

This course is a study of the principles of heredity based upon concepts and principles of the gene. Major topics include Mendelian genetics, sex determination and sex linkage, gene mapping, structure and function of DNA, translation, transcription, recombinant DNA technology, chromosome mutations and aberrations, transposons, extra nuclear genomes and quantitative genetics. Problem solving will be emphasized. Three lecture/discussion sections and one three hour laboratory period per week. (Prerequisite: BIO120)

Download Our Catalog

Systematic introduction to the conceptual and symbolic aspects of chemistry. Critical and quantitative thought as applied to the topics of measurement, formula and equation writing, stoichiometry, atomic structure and periodicity, bonding and molecular geometry, gases, phases and phase changes. Brief introduction to Organic Chemistry. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory period per week. (Prerequisites: High School chemistry and one year of algebra or consent of instructor)

Download Our Catalog

This course will explore fundamental topics from probability and descriptive and inferential statistics and apply these to a range of areas of study including business, social science, and biology. Topics include probability and counting rules, probability distributions, hypothesis testing, correlation, regression, chi-square, and analysis-of-variance. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in MAT100 or MAT103 or level 3 or higher placement on the Math Placement Exam.)

Download Our Catalog

This course emphasizes functions and their applications. It starts with investigating graphs and solutions of the algebraic functions including polynomial, rational, and root functions. The course continues by exploring transcendental functions including exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. The course concludes with a study of conic sections. The course is a good preparation for Calculus and for those students who will encounter functions in their course of study. Students must earn a minimum grade of C- in this course to progress to the next level Math course. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in MAT100 or MAT105 or level 4 or higher placement on the Math Placement Exam )

Download Our Catalog

This course explores the concepts of limit and continuity, investigates techniques of differentiation and its applications, introduces integration, and provides the framework for the Fundamental Theorem. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in MAT125 or level 5 placement on the Math Placement Exam.)

Download Our Catalog

Bachelor of Science degrees at Concordia University, St. Paul consists of a major of typically 45 to 60 credits, general education courses, and elective courses totaling a minimum of 128 credits.

Career Potential

  • Business
  • Community Education
  • Forensic Psychology
  • Human Resources
  • Psychiatry
  • Rehabilitation
  • Research
  • Residential Treatment
  • Social Services
  • Youth Education

Related Programs
Discover Similar Programs at CSP

Next Steps

Visit We'll work around your schedule We have tours available Monday - Friday several times a day throughout the semester and during the summer. Visit Us
Apply Join the Concordia Family When you attend Concordia University, you’re more than just a student. You’re part of the Concordia family. Apply
Enroll Finalize Your Enrollment Tuition Deposit, Financial Aid Application, Housing Application & Payment, Immunization Form Enroll