Certification inDirector of Christian Education (DCE)

A Director of Christian Education (DCE) is a synodically certified, called, and commissioned lifespan education leader prepared for team ministry in a congregational setting. During the five-year DCE program, you’ll take 86 credit hours to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree with a Director of Christian Education certification by majoring in Christian ministry, minoring in Lutheran Theology and completing a DCE internship. It will be a relevant certification if you’re seeking to serve in The Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod.

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Director of Christian Education (DCE) Curriculum Overview

DCE certification requires majoring in Christian Ministry. This program is designed to equip students for exemplary service in Christian ministry settings in the areas of education and/or outreach. It presupposes the minor in Lutheran Theology, which represents the theological core of the program and is taken by most church work students.

For Certification in the LCMS as a Director of Christian Education (DCE), add 12 credits of internship and 8 credits of additional coursework (as specified in the course listings). The DCE certification also requires completion of the Lutheran Theology minor.

Prerequisites from General Education
Course ID Course Name Credit Hours
THL - 206 New Testament 3
THL - 431 Lutheran Doctrine I 3
PSY - 101 Introduction to Psychology 4

An introduction to the historical context and literature of the New Testament. Students master the stories and teachings of early Christianity, and grow in their ability to read texts of the Bible in their historical and literary contexts.

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A study of the content and effective application of the Christian understanding of doctrine itself, God, creation, theological anthropology, and the person and work of Christ, with an exploration of the biblical basis, conceptual framework, and the contemporary significance of the historic doctrine of the Lutheran church. Particular attention will be given to the contributions of C.F.W. Walther to the Lutheran understanding of Law and Gospel. Prerequisites: THL201 and (THL206 or THL215)

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This course introduces the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Psychological, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic, psychodynamic and social-cultural perspectives are explored. Topics such as scientific method, statistical reasoning, neuroscience, learning, cognitive processes, development, psychological adjustment, therapy, social psychology, diversity and community are studied.

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Christian Ministry Major: 42 Credits
Course ID Course Name Credit Hours
CHM - 268 Intro. to Christian Ministry 2
CHM - 321 Found for Teaching & Learning 4
THL - 353 Varieties of Beliefs 4
CHM - 325 Strategic Ministry 3
CHM - 330 Cultural Context & Faith Devlp 3
CHM - 490 Theory to Action: Capstone 2
PSY - 215 Child & Ad Dev Psy for K-12 Ed 4
CHM - 440 Speaking the Gospel 4
CHM - 430 Child & Confirmation Ministry 4
CHM - 435 Teaching & Leading Adults 4
CHM - 421 Teaching to Lead and Equip 4
CHM - 425 Youth and Family Ministry 4

Through an exploration of scriptural, theological, historical and social foundations of Christian ministry, students work to develop a personal philosophy of ministry. In addition, students study and utilize essential leadership skills for effective Christian ministry practice and service. As a major project throughout the course, students develop a professional Christian ministry portfolio.

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Students explore the scriptural, theological and historical role of Christian education within the church. This exploration will equip students to teach the faith across the lifespan through an intentional implementation of Christian educational programs and experiences.

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From a Christian perspective, this course explores the varieties of human religious beliefs. Major religions are surveyed in terms of artifacts, behaviors, emotions, beliefs, values, world views, and histories. The course will cover Animism, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism, Islam, and Christianity, with special attention in the latter case devoted to the Christian denominations of North America. Prerequisites: THL100 or THL206 or THL215

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Christian ministry in diverse and fluid cultures calls for strategic and intentional leadership. Students explore and apply current strategic planning theories, methods and tools to help Christian ministry organizations fulfill their missions within ever-changing communities and cultural contexts. Through case study analysis and projects, students apply organizational change theory to congregations and ministry organizations.

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Students study the practice of Christian ministry within different cultural contexts and across the lifespan, paying particular attention to applying principles of biblical interpretation and a Lutheran understanding of Law and Gospel to the design and implementation of ministry experiences. Through applied projects, students develop a commitment to a reflective practice that respects diverse voices and beliefs.

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Students reflect on and formalize their understanding of Christian ministry in the context of their personal identity in Christ, the broader ministry of the Gospel, and their vision of future ministry and personal growth. Students prepare and present a capstone Christian Ministry project.

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This course will provide K through 12 educators an understanding of human growth and development from the prenatal stages through adolescence. Developmental processes are studied from both a biological and social-cultural perspective to understand physical and perceptual development, cognition and language, personality and social development. Child studies, examining various aspects of child and adolescent development, are required. (Prerequisite: PSY101)

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Students explore the practical application of models of personal witness and Christian apologetics through the development of skills in nurturing relationships, recognizing barriers to and opportunities for faith-sharing, dealing with fears, listening actively, and effectively applying Law and Gospel to the needs of the hearer. There is a fieldwork component to this course.

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Current and emerging theories of childrenÕs ministry serve as the foundation for developing engaging childrenÕs ministry practices, experiences and programs. Additionally, students research and plan effective approaches to confirmation programming. There is a fieldwork component to this course.

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Adult learning theory serves as a foundation for the development of adult education programs and experiences. Throughout this course students explore and apply theories of adult learning, spiritual formation, effective teaching methods and adult spiritual direction strategies. Participants utilize a planning process for initiating and leading adult education programs in ministry settings. There is a fieldwork component to this course.

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Effective ministry requires teams of transformational leaders. Educators and other leaders in the church serve and lead in ways that equip and empower others to serve within their local congregations, communities and beyond. Reflective practice helps leaders shape educational experiences that equip learners to serve and volunteer within diverse and rich cultural settings. Through applied projects and research, students design volunteer ministry programs and leadership training experiences. There is a fieldwork component to this course.

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Youth and family ministry is a partnership within congregation, home and community. Grounded in baptismal theology, this ministry is a tending of the faith journey throughout the lifespan. Students develop skills to lead a relational and Christ-centered ministry for and with youth in a congregation. There is a fieldwork component to this course.

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Additional Requirements for DCE Certification: 20 Credits
Course ID Course Name Credit Hours
CHM - 498 Commissioned Ministry Intern I 6
CHM - 499 Commiss. Ministry Internshp II 6

The internship provides DCE and DCO students a full-time supervised involvement in the educational or outreach ministries of a cooperating congregation or cross-cultural organization. Emphasis is placed on active leadership in a variety of professional tasks. Students register for CHM498 in the fall and CHM499 in the spring to complete the 12-month internship.

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The internship provides DCE and DCO students a full-time supervised involvement in the educational or outreach ministries of a cooperating congregation or cross-cultural organization. Emphasis is placed on active leadership in a variety of professional tasks. Students register for CHM498 in the fall and CHM499 in the spring to complete the 12-month internship.

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Completion of Lutheran Theology minor: (24 credits)
Course ID Course Name Credit Hours
THL - 201 Old Testament 3
THL - 206 New Testament 3
THL - 241 Church History 3
THL - 431 Lutheran Doctrine I 3
THL - 432 Lutheran Doctrine II 3
THL - 441 Lutheran Confessional Writings 3
THL - 460 Worship for Lutherans 3
THL - 219 Princ Biblical Interpretation 3

An introduction to the historical context and literature of the Old Testament. Special attention is paid to the concepts of promise, law, covenant, grace, and the presence of God in the narratives of the Pentateuch and the Former Prophets. The course also examines the nature of prophecy and the psalm and wisdom resources in the Prophets and Writings.

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An introduction to the historical context and literature of the New Testament. Students master the stories and teachings of early Christianity, and grow in their ability to read texts of the Bible in their historical and literary contexts.

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A panoramic survey of Christian history and thought from the apostolic age to the present. As such, the course traces the church's institutional history, its theology, its worship life, and the history of its missionary expansion against the larger political, intellectual, and socio-cultural back drop. This course is required for the minor in Confessional Lutheranism. It is not a general education course.

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A study of the content and effective application of the Christian understanding of doctrine itself, God, creation, theological anthropology, and the person and work of Christ, with an exploration of the biblical basis, conceptual framework, and the contemporary significance of the historic doctrine of the Lutheran church. Particular attention will be given to the contributions of C.F.W. Walther to the Lutheran understanding of Law and Gospel. Prerequisites: THL201 and (THL206 or THL215)

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A study of the content and effective application of the Christian understanding of the person and work of the Holy Spirit, sanctification, the means of grace, the Christian church, public ministry, and eschatology with an exploration of the biblical basis, conceptual framework, and the contemporary significance of the historic doctrine of the Lutheran church. Particular attention will be given to the contributions of C.F.W. Walther to the Lutheran understanding of church and ministry. Prerequisite: THL431

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A survey and analysis of the gospel-centered doctrinal content of the Book of Concord in its 16th century historical and theological context. The eleven confessional documents are studied and interpreted as the church's normative exposition of Holy Scripture, to which exposition the evangelical Lutheran church is committed in terms of both theological method and doctrinal substance.

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Exploring early church experience and Reformation teaching, the student uncovers the meaning of worship. Critical evaluation of contemporary practice and recent developments in worship make the student better able to provide leadership in congregational worship life.

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As an introduction to principles and methods of Biblical interpretation as employed by Lutherans with a high view of the Scriptures, students will focus on learning and practicing methodological models for studying and interpreting Biblical literature. Special attention will be given to the study of the historical/cultural context and literary nature of the inspired text. Prerequisites: THL 201 and THL 206.

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Emphasis in Christian Outreach (optional): (12 credits)
Course ID Course Name Credit Hours
THL - 371 Mission of God 4
CHM - 450 Great Commission Congregations 4
CHM - 455 Urban Outreach 4

This course traces the mission of God through the Old and New Testaments. It explores God's intent for his mission people in the past, present and future and discloses that intent in biblical narratives and texts and in Lutheran theology and Lutheran confessions. This course fulfills the intermediate general education requirement for Theology. (Prerequisite: THL100 or THL206 or THL215)

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Students explore a strategic, team-based approach to congregational outreach and discipleship. By means of classroom and field experiences a multi-phase model is explored, developed and applied to a chosen contextual setting. There is a fieldwork component to this course.

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Students develop an understanding and appreciation for the distinct outreach opportunities available in 21st century urban centers. Through classroom experience and interaction with cooperative agencies, a theological perspective is developed that moves students to connect entrepreneurial practices and evangelistic ministry. There is a fieldwork component to this course.

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Emphasis in Family Studies (optional): 12 credits (8 electives)
Course ID Course Name Credit Hours
FAS - 400 Family Systems 4
COM - 403 Family Communication 4
SOC - 253 Marriage and Family 4
SOC - 353 Themes in Adult Dev. & Aging 4
SOC - 451 Social Psychology 4

This course is an analysis of the family. It investigates the family as a system of relationships which interacts across the family life cycle. It includes a survey of current developments in the study of the family and an analysis of changes in American society and their influence on family life. Also included is a focus on marriage and family therapy from a systems framework.

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Students examine communication patterns in functional families and interpersonal relationships. Reading and discussion are combined with experiential activities. Course units include diverse family systems, health communication, communicating with aging family members and those with disabilities, communication patterns, family roles, power, decision-making, conflict, stress and coping, ecology, and improving family communication. (Prerequisites: (COM103 or COM212) and COM205)

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This course considers the family as one of the primary social institutions within the larger social system. It explores the family's internal structure and functioning, how it serves the needs of both individuals and society, how it is changing in contemporary American society, and the societal challenges of families in crisis. (Prerequisite: SOC152)

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This course explores a variety of themes in development throughout the lifespan beginning with youth and ending in the last stages of adulthood including aging, death and dying. Lifespan, sociological, psychological, and family science perspectives will be used to examine a variety of themes. (Prerequisite: SOC152)

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Students examine how the individual's personality, behavior and attitudes are shaped through interaction with others. The course deals with such issues as conformity, persuasion, aggression, altruism, and attraction. Individual behavior is understood in light of symbolic communication and the social construction of the self. (Prerequisite: SOC152 or PSY101)

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Emphasis in Biblical Studies (optional): 12 credits (4 electives)
Course ID Course Name Credit Hours
GRK - 211 Beginning Greek I 4
GRK - 212 Beginning Greek II 4
GRK - 312 Matthew 2
GRK - 314 Mark 2
GRK - 316 Luke 2
GRK - 412 Galatians and Romans 2
GRK - 414 Corinthians 2
GRK - 416 Other Epistles 2
THL - 409 Studies in Biblical Theology 2

Students begin their study of the fundamentals of Greek grammar.

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Students complete their study of the fundamentals of Greek grammar. (Prerequisite: GRK211)

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Through reading of major portions of the Greek text of Matthew, students build their skills in the translation of biblical Greek and analysis of grammatical forms. Particular attention will be given to the indicative verb. Matthew is read in the fall term prior to Year A in the liturgical cycle. (Prerequisite: GRK212 with a grade of C or above.)

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Through reading of the complete Greek text of Mark, students build their skills in the translation of biblical Greek and analysis of grammatical forms. Particular attention will be given to nouns, pronouns, and adjectives. Mark is read in the fall term prior to Year B in the liturgical cycle. (Prerequisite: GRK212 with a grade of C or above.)

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Through reading of major portions of the Greek text of Luke, students build their skills in the translation of biblical Greek and analysis of grammatical forms. Particular attention will be given to the vocabulary of Luke. Luke is read in the fall term prior to Year C in the liturgical cycle. (Prerequisite: GRK212 with a grade of C or above.)

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Through the reading of the complete Greek texts of Galatians and Romans, students build their skills in the translation of biblical Greek and analysis of grammatical forms. Particular attention will be given to participles. (Prerequisite: GRK212 with a grade of C or above.)

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Through reading of major portions of the Greek texts of both letters, students build their skills in the translation of biblical Greek and analysis of syntactic relationships. Particular attention will be given to the syntax of subordinate clauses. (Pre requisite: completion of GRK 212 with a grade of C or above.)

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Through selected reading of the Greek texts of a wide variety of epistolary writings, students build their skills in the translation of biblical Greek and in the analysis of textual variants. Particular attention will be given to texts displaying a broad range of textual variation. (Prerequisite: GRK212 with a grade of C or above.)

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An exploration of sections, books, or major topics of the Old and New Testaments, as determined by the instructor and announced by the division. This course is recommended for the major in theology. It does not fulfill the general education requirement for Theology. (Prerequisite: THL203, Old Testament Narrative; THL206, New Testament)

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Emphasis in Urban Ministry (optional): 12 credits (6 electives)
Course ID Course Name Credit Hours
CHM - 455 Urban Outreach 4
ENG - 320 Writing in the Workplace 2
URB - 201 Mission Shift Institute I 3
URB - 202 Mission Shift Institute II 3
URB - 310 Principles of Urban Ministry 3
URB - 320 History and Contemp Issues 3
URB - 330 Demographics and Research Mthd 3
URB - 340 Urban Service Issues 3
URB - 410 Urban Social Psychology 3
URB - 420 Intercult Com in Urban Setting 3
URB - 430 Urban Econ, Entrep, Comm Devlp 3
URB - 440 Race and Ethnicity in America 3

Students develop an understanding and appreciation for the distinct outreach opportunities available in 21st century urban centers. Through classroom experience and interaction with cooperative agencies, a theological perspective is developed that moves students to connect entrepreneurial practices and evangelistic ministry. There is a fieldwork component to this course.

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Students in this course will examine the conventions of writing in the workplace. The particular topics of the course will vary depending on the semester. Some of the topics covered might include grant writing, copyrighting, writing for the web, public relations writing, or technical writing. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in ENG120)

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This course introduces students to south Minneapolis, exposing them to the issues and topics they will study in greater detail in other U4C courses.

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This course continues the introduction of students to south Minneapolis, exposing them to the issues and topics they will study in greater detail in other U4C courses.

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This course is intended to provide the learner with an introduction to theory and methodology of urban ministry from a Biblical perspective. An overview of the history, theological trends, leadership and future of urban service, with attention to Biblical principles for evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of urban service and designs will be covered to give the students a greater understanding of urban service.

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This class is designed to give students a thorough understanding of the history and development of Minneapolis as well as its current trends and challenges. It gives the student and in-depth understanding of the milieu in which he or she will be studying the rest of the urban classes. The course will be taught using various learning methods including reading, lectures, discussions, research, writing, field trips, media presentations and guest speakers. As in integrative approach, the students will engage in a combination of classroom preparations, field experience and post-experience analysis, creating a critical reference point for the student to deepen his or her Christian worldview, cross-cultural engagement, and understanding of diverse social and cultural contexts.

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This class instructs students in the methods and procedures on how to conduct and read urban demographics. The class will focus on the consumption of demographic material to make competent, strategic decisions. The class will also require students to conduct mini-research projects to further their understanding of compiling demographic decisions.

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This class is designed to give students a good understanding of several interrelated areas of urban service. The students will learn from practitioners and specialists in each of the following areas: chemical dependency (including detox, intervention strategies, treatment methods, community resources, 12-step programs, etc.), teen pregnancy, prostitution and the sex industry, HIV/AIDS, Homeland Security/INS, domestic violence, narcotics distribution and gangs.

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This course will cover various phenomena related to social influence Ð the power of people to affect, persuade, or control the beliefs or behaviors of others. The student will become familiar with fundamental topics in social psychology, such as perception, motivation, attitudes, and attitude change.

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This course emphasizes parallels in learning a language and learning a culture in the urban, cross-cultural context. Course assignments and discussions are designed for application in everyday encounters with individuals from other cultures within the city.

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This course is a study of the process of forming and managing a non-profit organization, with a focus on the unique contributions and characteristics of faith-based organizations. Students will spend eight hours on-sight at a local ministry non-profit, attending board meeting, interviewing the chief executive and observing programs. Through this field study, students will witness the application of the concepts taught in class and will be asked to assess the various aspects of the non-profit they are studying. In addition, students will develop an overall concept/vision for a non-profit organization they would like to start and will develop a strategic plan and case statement for it.

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In this course students will examine the issues surrounding race relations in the United States. This examination will include some of the history of race relations leading up to the most current racial climate. The class will develop a Biblical grid through which to understand the issues. Students will not only study the issues but also learn to think critically about Christian and secular models currently offered to solve racial problems in our nation. The class will also attempt to recast valuable secular models into Biblical categories. The class will suggest alternative modes of thinking about race relations to those concerned individuals and institutions in our culture.

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Emphasis in Theology (optional): 12 credits
Course ID Course Name Credit Hours
THL - 310 Archaeology and the Bible 4
THL - 320 Global Christianity 4
THL - 336 The Problem of Evil 4
THL - 342 Athens and Jerusalem 4
THL - 344 Martin Luther: Saint & Sinner 4
THL - 351 Jesus and Muhammad 4
THL - 352 Is God Green? 4
THL - 356 One Nation under God? 4
THL - 357 Christianity & the Media 4
THL - 409 Studies in Biblical Theology 2

Archaeology has become an indispensable source for the reconstruction of past cultures and therefore is of direct importance for Biblical studies. The course aims at giving students insight into the material culture of societies in the ancient Levant from the Bronze and Iron ages down to the material context of Early Christianity in the Roman and Byzantine periods. Students will be introduced to basic methods of archaeological work and to important archaeological regions, periods and types of material culture relevant to the world of the Bible and Christianity. Students will use archaeological data to reconstruct contexts for biblical texts. This course fulfills the intermediate general education requirement for Theology. (Prerequisite: THL100 or THL206 or THL215)

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The question ÒWhat is Christianity?Ó will be explored from a global perspective. After surveying the state of Christianity, its teachings, and practices, students will wrestle with basic questions of life and Christian vocation in the third millennium. A major component of the course will be study of worship practices of area churches representing diverse cultural and immigrant groups. This course fulfills the intermediate general education requirement for Theology. (Prerequisite THL100 or THL206 or THL215)

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The problem of evil has led human beings to ask difficult questions about God. If God is both all-powerful and completely good (as many religious traditions claim), then why does God allow evil? Or, does evil demonstrate that in fact, there is no God? In this course, students will grapple with classic philosophical, Christian, and other religious approaches to these questions. They also will examine how these different approaches lead to different practical responses to evil in our personal lives and in our public life together. This course fulfills the intermediate general education requirement for Theology. (Prerequisite: THL100 or THL206 or THL215)

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A selective historical survey of the principal areas of inquiry, key figures, major issues, and central themes commonly addressed by western philosophy and Christian theology during the ancient, medieval, modern and contemporary periods. Among the topics that may be considered are the relationship of faith and reason; truth; nature and grace; the classical arguments for the existence of God; evil; the philosophical and theological virtues; and religious language. The course is based on extensive readings from primary sources and is supplemented by lectures and discussions. This course fulfills the intermediate general education requirement for Theology. (Prerequisite: THL100 or THL206 or THL215)

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This course examines the life and theology of the Martin Luther, instigator of the Protestant Reformation in the 16th century. A prolific writer and bold thinker, Luther appears today on many top ten lists of most influential people in the last millennium. By studying Luther in his medieval context and by reviewing the influence of his thought since the 16th century, the course will explore the relevance of his theology for the 21st century. This course fulfills the intermediate general education requirement for Theology. (Prerequisite: THL100 or THL206 or THL215)

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This course explores the lives, contributions, teachings, and significance of Jesus and Muhammad through selected reading of the Christian Scriptures, pagan and Jewish sources, the QurÕan, Ibn Hishan, Al-Waqidi, and some later writers. Students will gain skill and confidence in reading ancient texts and understanding the historical, social, and religious trends that shaped the ancient world. This course fulfills the intermediate general education requirement for Theology. (Prerequisite: THL100 or THL206 or THL215)

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Drawing on the resources of Christianity and other religions, this course examines issues of ecology, sustainability and human health (broadly conceived). Students will explore the significance of Biblical themes of creation and new creation as they consider 21st century ethical choices for the care of the cosmos and the human community. This course fulfills the intermediate general education requirement for Theology.(Prerequisite: THL100 or THL206 or THL215)

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The claim that the United States is a Christian nation will be examined from the Puritan settlers through the rise of the religious right in the late twentieth century, with particular emphasis on the notion of covenant and the influence of Christian leaders in various reform movements (abolitionist, temperance, womenÕs suffrage, civil rights). The question of Òone nation under GodÓ will be tested against the Lutheran doctrine of the two kingdoms. This course fulfills the intermediate general education requirement for Theology.(Prerequisite: THL100 or THL206 or THL215)

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Christianity has an unmistakable interplay with various forms of the media. This course explores subtle and overt Christian themes in movies, music, magazines/newspapers, theater, the World Wide Web, and television. Students locate, watch, and critically analyze numerous media resources and discuss them in correlation to Christian themes in the Bible. This course fulfills the intermediate general education requirement for Theology. (Prerequisite: THL100 or THL206 THL215)

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An exploration of sections, books, or major topics of the Old and New Testaments, as determined by the instructor and announced by the division. This course is recommended for the major in theology. It does not fulfill the general education requirement for Theology. (Prerequisite: THL203, Old Testament Narrative; THL206, New Testament)

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Emphasis in Communication (optional): 12 credits
Course ID Course Name Credit Hours
ENG - 320 Writing in the Workplace 2
COM - 205 Small Group Communication 4
COM - 212 Public Speaking 4
COM - 309 Intercultural Communication 4
COM - 325 Social Media & Public Relation 4

Students in this course will examine the conventions of writing in the workplace. The particular topics of the course will vary depending on the semester. Some of the topics covered might include grant writing, copyrighting, writing for the web, public relations writing, or technical writing. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in ENG120)

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Students study and practice communication in small discussion and task groups. Topics include leadership and facilitation of groups as well as group dynamics. Group activities include problem solving discussions and task completion. Course units include goal setting, cohesion and norms, power, leadership, decision-making and problem solving, conflict and facilitating task and interpersonal relations in face-to-face and virtual groups. (Prerequisite: COM103 or COM212)

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Students prepare and deliver various types of public performances including speeches and oral interpretation. The evaluation and criticism of speeches is studied. Videotape helps students adjust to their performance style and improve presentation delivery. Course units include speech construction, presentation and delivery, audience and text analysis, informative, persuasive and special occasion speeches as well as visual aid construction. (COM212 is one of the two choices for the communication general education requirement for all students. It is also a prerequisite for all communication majors.)

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Students explore the principles and processes of communication between cultures. Course topics include intercultural communication models, the impact of different cultural patterns on the communication process, the anthropological concept world view and its impact on intercultural communication, detection of communication problems in intercultural situations, gender and diversity issues in intercultural communication, and constructing valid strategies for communicating interculturally. (Prerequisite: COM103 or COM212)

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Students develop an understanding of the theory and strategic management of social media especially in the public relations context. By analyzing history, tactics and current trends, students learn how the public relations process and the goal of relationship building with various stakeholders is impacted by various social media applications. Students also become acquainted with social media tactics in various professional settings. (Required prerequisite: COM103 or COM212)(Suggested prerequisite: COM222)

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Certification for Church work is the process by which the faculty
approves candidates for placement in the public ministry of The Lutheran Church Missouri Synod (LCMS); including teacher, Director of Christian Education, Director of Christian Outreach, and Director of Parish Music.

Meet Your Professors

Heath Lewis, DCE Faculty, Theology & Ministry; Director of DCE Program

Heath Lewis will be involved in reinvigorating the historically strong Christian Education programs at Concordia University.

Dr. Mark Schuler Department of Theology and Ministry Chairperson, Professor of Theology

Schuler passes on his passion for Biblical Greek and the New Testament to Concordia students in the classroom.

Dr. Rhoda Schuler Term Faculty in Religion

Dr. Schuler’s research passions are liturgical theology and ritual studies, which she views as more than academic disciplines.

Mark Koschmann Fiechtner Chair in Christian Outreach
Instructor in Theology & Missiology

In addition to his teaching, Koschmann leads the mentoring program of the Hoffmann Institute in urban and cross-cultural outreach.

Career Potential

  • DCE
  • Adult Ministry Director
  • Children's and Family Ministry Director
  • Lifespan Christian Educator
  • Camp Director
  • Outdoor Ministry Director
Student Success Stories Anna Dauffenbach ’15 - Director of Christian Education

"With CSP being in such an urban location, I learned so much about the need of God's love in all places, and how many opportunities there are to share the Gospel."

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