Bachelor of ArtsChemistry

Majoring in Chemistry involves the study of the composition, structure, properties, and reactions of matter, especially of atomic and molecular systems. What are the effects of chemicals used in the home and workplaces? How are unknown compounds identified? How can you speed up chemical processes in an organism? You’ll sharpen your analytical, problem-solving, scientific reasoning, critical thinking, communication and laboratory skills as you work towards a Bachelor of Arts degree.

26 NCAA Academic All-America Honors
1893 the year Concordia was founded
16:1 Student/Faculty Ratio
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Chemistry Curriculum Overview

Chemistry coursework at Concordia University gives students a framework of knowledge that allow them to learn and incorporate new facts and concepts as the field evolves. Chemistry students benefit from a low faculty-to-student ratio that allows direct personal attention from faculty who focus primarily on teaching. Students often combine majors and minors in Chemistry, Biology and/or Mathematics to gain breadth and additional depth of knowledge.

Prerequisites (not counted in major credit total)
Course ID Course Name Credit Hours
PHS - 112 General Physics I (Trig Based) 4
PHS - 221 General Physics I (Calc Based) 4
MAT - 110 Intro Probability & Statistics 3
BIO - 120 Biology I: The Unity of Life 4
CHE - 115 General Chemistry I 4

This algebraic-based course deals with the areas of mechanics and mechanical waves. Physics concepts related to mechanics and mechanical waves are developed mathematically, applied to practical situations, and measured and analyzed in the laboratory setting. Students make use of the computer as a tutorial aid, use a great variety of laboratory equipment (including sensors along with the computer) to procure and analyze data, and use selected software to demonstrate physics concepts and model practical situations. The course meets for two lecture periods each week and for 2 - 2 period lab sessions each week.

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This calculus-based course deals with the areas of mechanics, thermodynamics, and wave motion. Physics' concepts related to these topics are presented, applied to practical situations, and measured and analyzed in the laboratory setting. Students make use of the computer as a tutorial aid, use a great variety of laboratory equipment (including sensors along with the computer) to procure and analyze data, and use selected software to demonstrate physics' concepts and model practical situations. The Internet and literature are used to obtain current information. The course is applicable to students majoring in pre-medicine, pre-engineering, biology, chemistry, mathematics, and science education. (Prerequisites: One year of high school physics and Calculus I)

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This course will explore fundamental topics from probability and descriptive and inferential statistics and apply these to a range of areas of study including business, social science, and biology. Topics include probability and counting rules, probability distributions, hypothesis testing, correlation, regression, chi-square, and analysis-of-variance. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in MAT100 or MAT103 or level 3 or higher placement on the Math Placement Exam.)

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Emphasizing inquiry and investigation, this course introduces students to the discoveries, both historical and contemporary, that support the unifying theories of modern biological science. Topics considered include the nature and methods of modern biological science; the basis of life in terms of matter, energy, cells, genetics, and reproduction; and the impact of evolution on the unity of life. The course is comprised of lectures, readings, discussions, written assignments, films, and an inquiry-based laboratory component. (Recommended prerequisites: one year of high school biology and chemistry and four years of high school mathematics)

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Systematic introduction to the conceptual and symbolic aspects of chemistry. Critical and quantitative thought as applied to the topics of measurement, formula and equation writing, stoichiometry, atomic structure and periodicity, bonding and molecular geometry, gases, phases and phase changes. Brief introduction to Organic Chemistry. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory period per week. (Prerequisites: High School chemistry and one year of algebra or consent of instructor)

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Required
Course ID Course Name Credit Hours
MAT - 135 Calculus I 4
CHE - 116 General Chemistry II 4
CHE - 221 Organic Chemistry I 4
CHE - 222 Organic Chemistry II 0
CHE - 326 Analytical Chemistry I 4
CHE - 328 Biochemistry 0
PHS - 222 General Physics II-Calc Based 4
PHS - 113 General Physics II-Trig Based 4
CHE - 341 Physical Chemistry 4
CHE - 456 Chemistry Research 0
CHE - 498 Chemistry Internship 2

This course explores the concepts of limit and continuity, investigates techniques of differentiation and its applications, introduces integration, and provides the framework for the Fundamental Theorem. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in MAT125 or level 5 placement on the Math Placement Exam.)

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Continuation of General Chemistry 1. Solutions and Colligative Properties, Equilibrium, Thermodynamics, Qualitative Analysis, Kinetics, Reduction, Oxidation, Nuclear Chemistry. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory period per week. (Prerequisite: CHE115)

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This course is an introductory study of organic compounds using a functional group approach and stressing basic principles. Topics covered include the covalence of carbon, isomerism, stereoisomerism and the structure, properties, nomenclature and reactions of the common functional groups. The determination of molecular structure is introduced. (Prerequisite: CHE116)

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This course is a continuation of Organic Chemistry I. Topics covered include additional functional group chemistry, reaction mechanisms, heterocyclic compounds, proteins, lipids and synthetic macromolecules. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week. (Prerequisite: CHE221)

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Introduction to the wet and instrumental techniques of analytical chemistry. Emphasis on Gravimetric and Volumetric Analysis, Statistical Evaluation of Data and Quality Assurance. Three lectures (150 minutes) and one four-hour laboratory period per week. (Prerequisite: CHE116)

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Molecular determinants of structure and function of biomolecules. Biological processes at the molecular level. Enzyme catalysis, bioenergetics, and metabolism. Three lectures (150 minutes) and one laboratory period (180 minutes) per week. (Prerequisite: CHE221)

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This calculus-based course deals with the areas of electricity and magnetism, light and optics and modern physics. Physics' concepts related to these topics are presented, applied to practical situations, and measured and analyzed in the laboratory setting. Students make use of the computer as a tutorial aid, use a great variety of laboratory equipment (including sensors along with the computer) to procure and analyze data, and use selected software to demonstrate physics' concepts and model practical situations. The Internet and literature are used to obtain current information. The course is applicable to students majoring in pre-medicine, pre-engineering, biology, chemistry, mathematics, and science education. (Prerequisite: PHS221)

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This algebra/trigonometry-based course deals with the areas of electricity, magnetism, light, optics, and modern physics. Physics' concepts related to these topics are presented, applied to practical situations, and measured and analyzed in the laboratory setting. Students make use of the computer as a tutorial aid, use a great variety of laboratory equipment (including sensors along with the computer) to procure and analyze data, and use selected software to demonstrate physics' concepts and model practical situations. The Internet and literature are used to obtain current information. The course meets for 2 periods each week and for 2 - 2 period lab sessions each week.

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This course is an introduction to fundamental topics in physical chemistry, including quantum theory, electronic structure, computational chemistry, thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. (Prerequisite: CHE116)

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This course offers students an opportunity to do original research in an area of expertise of one of the chemistry faculty members. When applicable, the research will be followed with presentation of a paper at an undergraduate research conferences and submission of a paper for publication. Two to three hours of laboratory and/or library work per credit per week.

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The internship is designed to provide students with a work/educational experience that may help determine future educational and occupational goals.

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Electives
Course ID Course Name Credit Hours
EGR - 200 Introduction to Engineering 4
CHE - 230 Environmental Chemistry 3
CHE - 330 Dietary Biochemistry 4
CHE - 431 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 3
CHE - 450 Special Topics in Chemistry 1
CHE - 497 Chemistry Teaching Assistant 4

Students will develop skills critical for practicing engineers. The course will focus on disciplinary areas of engineering and engineering design, and will give students extensive exposure to visual, written and oral communication forms, and to computer-based design tools. Students will complete substantial design projects, including prototype construction.

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This course considers the chemistry of earth's natural environment: air, water, and soil. Systems will be examined to contrast their natural chemistries with potential environmental pollution effects. Three lectures per week and several field trips are taken to various laboratories. (Prerequisite: CHE116)

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Examination of the digestion and utilization of macromolecules from a biochemical viewpoint. Metabolic pathway activation/regulation via diet. Factors influencing macromolecule content of common foodstuffs. (Prerequisite: CHE328)

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Introduction to ligand field theory, group theory, organometallics, and catalysis. This lecture course will provide students with an introductory look at appropriate molecular theories and related descriptive chemistry. (Prerequisites: CHE115, CHE116, CHE321, CHE326, MAT135, MAT255, PHS221, PHS222, or permission of instructor.)

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The topic for this course will be chosen from a wide range of current research and development in chemistry. Students will read background material, participate in discussions, and complete labs and/or writing assignments as instructed.

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Students enrolled in this course will work with a faculty member to gain teaching experience in chemistry courses. Activities may include: designing laboratory exercises; working with students in laboratory, classroom and tutoring environment; preparing and delivering lectures; developing course materials; grading.

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Bachelor of Arts degrees at Concordia University, St. Paul consists of a major of typically 32 to 44 credits or two minors, general education courses, and elective courses totaling a minimum of 128 credits.

Meet Your Professors

Leanne Bakke, Ph.D. Professor of Biology, Science Department Chair

Dr. Bakke has a background in molecular physiology and currently acts as the head of the science department.

Amanda Brosnahan Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Biology

Dr. Brosnahan’s interests in infectious disease led her to pursue a Ph.D. in the areas of microbiology, immunology and cancer biology.

Benjamin Harrison, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Biology

Dr. Harrison brings a wide range of academic interests which stem from his fascination with DNA, chromosomes, and the cell cycle.

Taylor Mach, Ph.D. Term Professor of Chemistry

Dr. Mach’s varied experience gives him expertise in physical chemistry, physics, and education.

Carolyn Wanamaker, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Dr. Wanamaker’s interests include using organic and polymer chemistry to create novel biodegradable plastics.

Mary Ann Yang Ph.D. Associate Professor of Biology

Dr. Yang has research experience in the both the industrial and academic sectors of biology. Her areas of interest include neurobiology, tissue engineering, and cell biology.

Career Potential

You’ll also have real opportunities beyond the classroom, in activities such as working as a laboratory assistant, participating in the Tetra Delta science club and completing internships. And because we design our chemistry program to be responsive to the exact needs of the marketplace, it will be a relevant major if you’re considering a career as a chemist, pharmacist, chemical engineer, environmental scientist, food scientist, industrial researcher, laboratory technician, patent attorney, medical professional or other professional in a chemistry-related field. Additional education may be required for some careers listed.

  • Chemist
  • Chemical Engineer
  • Chemistry Teacher or Professor
  • Environmental Scientist
  • Food Scientist
  • Healthcare Provider
  • Industrial Researcher
  • Laboratory Technician
  • Patent Attorney
  • Pharmaceutical Engineer
  • Pharmacist
Student Success Stories Lisa Atkinson ’15 - Biology and Chemistry

"Having good relationships with my faculty helped me reach my academic and future goals."

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